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Drone strike for the WikiLeaks founder?

Did my colleague, Marc Thiessen, just call for a drone strike in Iceland? Thiessen is obviously incensed by WikiLeaks's dissemination of tens of thousands of pages of government documents relating to the Afghan war. And he wants WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange, to pay. Here's how Thiessen put it:

Assange is a non-U.S. person operating outside the territory of the United States. This means the government has a wide range of options for dealing with him. It can employ not only law enforcement, but also intelligence and military assets, to bring Assange to justice and put his criminal syndicate out of business.

"Military assests"? Does Thiessen think we're going to send in Special Ops to pluck Assange from Iceland, Belgium or Sweden, where he's known to hang out? Or is he thinking that a drone strike might be more effective or efficient?

Thiessen asserts that the United States does not need "permission to apprehend Assange or his co-conspirators anywhere in the world" and that the U.S. should act alone if allies won't cooperate. I'm not sure this is legally accurate, but let's assume it is. Is Thiessen suggesting it would be a good idea to disregard an ally's sovereignty, perhaps do irreparable damage to our relationship with it and the international community just to get our hands on Assange?

Thiessen's concerns about leaks may be justified, but at least some of his proposed plans of action are more than a little scary and, as it concerns the Wiki founder, more than a little wacky.

By Eva Rodriguez  | August 2, 2010; 12:26 PM ET
Categories:  Rodriguez  | Tags:  Eva Rodriguez  
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Next: No, I'm not suggesting drone strikes on WikiLeaks

Comments

"blood on his hands" indeed.

Posted by: millionea81 | August 2, 2010 1:37 PM | Report abuse

Drone strike, no. Recognize that this fool has provided aid and assistance to enemies of the United States, indeed. If anyone is harmed by these leaks he should definitely be prosecuted.

Posted by: bbface21 | August 2, 2010 1:56 PM | Report abuse

Prosecuted? If you are not a US citizen or resident, you are perfectly free to oppose US policies, trade with our enemies. We don't have to like it, and we can refuse you a visa if you want to come here, but you are breaking no US law. Nor are you an "unlawful combatant" (whatever that is).

This is not a road we want to start down. What we do to others, others are at liberty to do to us. To say nothing of the fact that we forfeit what remains of our moral high ground.

Let's say the editor of the Guardian begins a highly damaging, but uncomfortable series of articles which turn what is left of world support for our occupations of Iraq and Afghanistan against us, and the "alliance" starts crumbling. Does that mean we can take out the Guardian's building and the editor with drone strikes? Hey I got an idea, what about Roman Polanski? If we can't extradite him, let's send something long and phallus shaped his way that will really explode! Also that guy who scored the goal which beat us in the World Cup, never mind, Ghana's barely a country anyway, and what are they gonna do about it?

God save us all from Thiessen.

Posted by: Nemo24601 | August 2, 2010 2:33 PM | Report abuse

If Assange has broken the law, then what about the editors of the New York Times and the Washington Post, who for cats sake *published* the material? Why not send some drones after them? Thiessen is wonderfully inconsistent.

Posted by: fzdybel | August 2, 2010 2:35 PM | Report abuse

Assenge has allied himself with the Taliban, Al-Qa'ida, IJU, IMU, the Muslim Brotherhood and their many incarnations against the West, against education and civilization. He obviously favors killing Western and Government of Afghanistan troops in Afghanistan, murdering Benazir Bhutto, putting car bombs into markets, hi-jacking airplanes and crashing them into buildings, pirating ships in the Red Sea. He obviously believes in the Burkha and burning down girls' schools and killing their teachers.

That's why he turned himself into the Taliban's great propaganda purveyer. In other words he is an enemy combatant. He has no immunity and no sanctuary.

Oh,...he doesn't really believe that? He was just "playing" at being an Islamic fanatic revolutionary in between sittings at the locat Red card-carrier cafe?...You mean he was just an anti-American, ego maniac who wanted to "be" somebody so he published stuff that is going to get our allies and us killed?

Oh in that case, spank him in public.

Posted by: wjc1va | August 2, 2010 3:27 PM | Report abuse

according to Thiessen's own blog, he also wants the US to pressure Iceland to repeal freedom-of-the-press protections. that is funny on many levels.

Posted by: millionea81 | August 2, 2010 3:42 PM | Report abuse

Well, torture-boy wants more blood. And he has his cheering section. You know, the 'Good Germans' like 'wjc1va'.

Posted by: AMviennaVA | August 2, 2010 4:22 PM | Report abuse

It's nice to see someone at the Washington Post actually calling Thiessen out. His constant over the top cheer leading for aggressive military imperialism and support for torture is sickening. His presence on the editorial page is a stain on this paper.

Posted by: Chip_M | August 2, 2010 6:08 PM | Report abuse

Thank you, Ms. Rodriguez! I was appalled by Thiessen's statements.

Posted by: bragova | August 2, 2010 6:40 PM | Report abuse

The best way to handle Julian Assange would be to assassinate him. Who cares what our "allies" feel if American lives have been put at risk by this clown. It is what a country should do to protect its own citizens and military operations overseas.

Nothing was said about a "drone attack" making this ridiculous article grandstanding at best. But who really is suprised when a liberal loon defends someone like Assange.

The military traitor needs to be tried for treason and executed as well.

Posted by: VAGuy01 | August 2, 2010 7:07 PM | Report abuse

Touche'.

Posted by: Itzajob | August 2, 2010 8:08 PM | Report abuse

Thiessen is a fascist if you really read this twice; why on Earth does the formerly reputable Washington Post publish this hack? Thiessen, you are a disgrace to your Nation. Go away now, please, and twitch the rest of your days on a rock someplace in another hemisphere; leave us alone.

Like Beck, Hannity, Limbaugh, he's just a media loudmouth, with no academic credentials to possibly understand what he declares is International Law, who seeks to incite violence against Mr. Assange. I hold the Washington Post accountable for any harm that comes to him by way of the lawless U.S. Military Industrial Complex or its sympathizers in Red State America whom Thiessen seeks to incite by way of the Post.

--Attorney

Posted by: ChooseYourLaw | August 2, 2010 8:51 PM | Report abuse

Good call Ms Eva Rodriguez.

You do realize the Marc Thiessen is still defending Dick Cheney's torture regime, calling waterboarding "enhanced interrogation" and claiming the president can crush a kid's testicles in the name of national security... In fact, there is no limit to a President's power to fight terrorists .... well as long as its a Republican president.

Posted by: NeilSagan | August 2, 2010 9:04 PM | Report abuse

"The best way to handle Julian Assange would be to assassinate him."

Yes, how dare Assange expose all that bungling. We must make the world safe for bunglers. Our survival depends on it.

Fulminate all you like. The game is done, and you lost. Osama bin Laden destroyed what was left of this country. What's left is just a hollow shell. America against the world, and never mind the rule of law, or what the neighbors think. It was a long slide down from the city on the hill, but it seemed hardly to take a moment.

Posted by: fzdybel | August 2, 2010 9:37 PM | Report abuse

The fact that the Washington Post employs torture-supporting neo-fascists like Marc Thiessen proves that the Post is not "liberal."

That is the Post's theory, right?

Well, the one thing the Right and the Left can celebrate together is the coming implosion, bankruptcy, and death of the mainstream media.

Posted by: cyborg_bob | August 2, 2010 10:21 PM | Report abuse

bbface21 you sound just like the southpark "dey tuk our jerrrrrbs" rednecks.

Posted by: nbooradley | August 3, 2010 6:48 AM | Report abuse

I know that it's useless to point out that such extrajudicial murder would be immoral. Our precious neocons, who fancy themselves to be a great warrior race (Klingons perhaps), believe that the U.S. government is above such petty considerations. Rules of civilized behavior are for those other, inferior countries.

But they should at least consider the practical side: kill this man, or arrest him and throw him in Gitmo, and you make a martyr of him. How do you think that will help our "security"?

Posted by: EnjoyEverySandwich | August 3, 2010 8:10 AM | Report abuse

Thiessen, like Sarah Palin and Newt Gingrich, are not lawyers and do not understand the law. There is the Constitution, federal statutes, a treaties, all of which would FORBID the US from doing what Thiessen wants the government to do. He would have the US turn into a rogue state. Luckily, we had an election in 2008 that meant Thiessen, Palin, Gingrich and their ilk remain far from the decision-making throne for a few more years. Idiots . . . .

Posted by: B-Rob | August 3, 2010 9:02 AM | Report abuse

What's "more than a little wacky" is giving Thiessen a credible forum to spit his drivel.
Really folks, readers welcome well reasoned and sound counter-arguments to our biases.
Helps us think. Sometimes even changes our minds.
The Post does not need to stoop to the FOX-not-facts mentality to stay relevant.

Posted by: sirstevedom | August 3, 2010 5:21 PM | Report abuse

What's "more than a little wacky" is giving Thiessen a credible forum to spit his drivel.
Really folks, readers welcome well reasoned and sound counter-arguments to our biases.
Helps us think. Sometimes even changes our minds.
The Post does not need to stoop to the FOX-not-facts mentality to stay relevant.

Posted by: sirstevedom | August 3, 2010 5:24 PM | Report abuse

Having been silenced by multiple entities for whistleblowing about systemic abuse, fraud and crime, I welcome the war logs leaks by Wikileaks. The USA specializes in aggressive incompetence and incompetent aggression. Remember, we conducted a "Shock & Awe" campaign in the wrong country! Information about the behavior of powerful and violent organizations is essential. I do not support the leaking of benign information that serves to bind people together such as the rituals of various organizations with no history of abusive behavior.

Posted by: murmur55 | August 4, 2010 2:13 PM | Report abuse

Rodriguez poses the question thus:

"Is Thiessen suggesting it would be a good idea to disregard an ally's sovereignty, perhaps do irreparable damage to our relationship with it and the international community just to get our hands on Assange?"

She has it backward. What is the appropriate response to a country who enables others to do irreparable damage to American security by aiding and abetting treason?

The liberal bias is built into her question.

Posted by: RKB320 | August 5, 2010 3:18 PM | Report abuse

This is a whole can of worms not to be opened. Once you start down this road, retaliation is inevitable. Let's say someone does like "the Dog" bounty hunter and gets caught in another country trying to "extremely render" someone like this Julian person. Can you imagine how hard it would be to get justice through legal channels the next time when they no longer allow our officers in and judges are ticked off?

Posted by: jw_nospam_ | August 6, 2010 8:25 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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