Dan Deacon: I Turn My Camera On

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Dan Deacon must have been as sick of his one-man show as I was. There's only so much you can get out of a live performance that consists of one dude pressing a few buttons and singing through a Woody Woodpecker vocal filter. So the man at the center of Baltimore's thriving/fading (depending on your perspective) underground art-school scene brought more than a dozen of his friends on tour with him for this go-round and it sure made things more interesting.

Deacon still played the camp counselor role -- not pictured (Kyle had to go home and cry about the Celtics) are the "audience participation" moments when he led the exceedingly young audience members in a dance contest, gauntlet/London Bridge that stretched from the floor level to the balcony and other assorted Bar Mitzvah games. It's beyond ridiculous and wholly absurd, but hey, at least the kids are getting out from behind their blogs and getting some exercise, right?

And at least this time he had some of the campers on stage with him, making some actual music -- lots of drummers and keyboard players and it sure looked like there was a guy in a shark outfit playing clarinet at one point. Gold star goes to drummer Denny Bowen from Baltimore's finest, Double Dagger, who pounded the living hell out of his kit, which made those pulsing electronic beats seriously pounding. Upgrade.

Deacon's music is straight-up Nintendo rock, but give the man credit -- he knows how to make all those hyperactive blips and bleeps sound good. And it doesn't even matter that every song ends in the same old-school rave climax. No matter how many times he repeated the trick, the kids leaped toward the rafters just the same. Kyle Gustafson's pictures follow.

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(Pictures of openers Future Islands after the jump.)

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By David Malitz |  May 18, 2009; 4:23 PM ET Live Last Night , Pictures
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