Patty Loveless: Live last night

patty loveless

Live Last Night

By Juli Thanki

"I want you to feel like you're in my living room," Patty Loveless said to a worshipful Birchmere crowd Sunday night. The giant '30s console radio and table lamps onstage certainly added to the effect as the honey-voiced Loveless delivered two hours of country and bluegrass music, or, as she put it, "sharing music about real people and real life situations."

(A pair of standing ovations and covers of George Jones and Emmylou Harris, after the jump.)

The set list was organized in roughly chronological order, beginning with her cover of Lucinda Williams' "The Night's Too Long" (a Loveless single in 1990), progressing to timeless country songs by Ray Price and George Jones from her covers album "Sleepless Nights," and ending with a block of bluegrass music, her most recent endeavor, with a few deep cuts -- and a rowdy singalong of her biggest hit "Blame It On Your Heart" -- thrown in for good measure.

Though Loveless was in good spirits, teasing her band members and joking with audience members, two somber moments punctuated the evening. Loveless, a coalminer's daughter (her father died of black lung), brought the crowd to their feet with her stunning bluegrass version of "You'll Never Leave Harlan Alive," dedicated to her late parents, who had "the best seat in the house." She also dedicated "Too Many Memories" to the late Stephen Bruton, fighting tears as she ended the song with a sincere "Thank you, Stephen."

An encore that included Emmylou Harris' gospel song "Diamond in My Crown" brought the Birchmere crowd to its feet once more. The last one to exit the stage, Patty Loveless turned out the lights.

By David Malitz |  November 2, 2009; 1:56 PM ET Live Last Night
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Comments

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I had not been to a show for many years prior to this one. The preformance was perfect, but in many ways to much so. I'm guessing the band had a click in there in-ear monitors. The time was too good, country & mountain music, played sans-drums should breath more in terms of tempo. The mountain tunes had more of that, but the commercial country just didn't have a drummer. The mix overall reminded me or radio these days, everything was the same "perfect" volume. In other words, the dynamic range was minimal. Easy to play back on cheap speakers, but not necessary at the Birchmere. Room sounded great.

Posted by: pbassjbass | November 3, 2009 11:47 PM

It's possible a click track was happening certainly, but a great band, which there are a lot of coming out of Nashville, could be what was happening. Bluegrass bands do it all the time without a drummer. How about just appreciating it for what it was.

Posted by: tojo45 | November 4, 2009 10:36 AM

It's possible a click track was happening certainly, but a great band, which there are a lot of coming out of Nashville, could be what was happening. Bluegrass bands do it all the time without a drummer. How about just appreciating it for what it was.

Posted by: tojo45 | November 4, 2009 10:37 AM

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