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Kramer Helps Seinfeld DVD Marketing. Not.

Frank Ahrens

Today, Sony -- which owns the digital distribution rights to "Seinfeld" -- launched a MySpace page to promote the show's Season 7 DVDs, on sale now. In addition to the usual bells and whistles, the page lets you paste some memorable "Seinfeld" video onto your MySpace page.

One more example of Old Media using the viral qualities of New Media to pimp a product.

I'm sure Sony hopes that no one posts the unfortunate video of Michael "Kramer" Richards racist comedy-club slurs or his painful Letterman apology, which also are circulating virally on the Web.

Today In The Post:

* Now that we're comfortable with the DVD, it's time to throw it out. But wait, there's more confusion ahead: No, it would be waaay to easy to simply replace the DVD with something better, like the DVD2. Now, we have to chose between two kinds of super-DVDs: HD-DVD and Blu-ray. Thanks a lot, guys. Kim Hart reports.

Elsewhere:

* How do you get your phone service--through your cable operator? You get video from your phone company? Things may be swell for you, but the companies vying for your business are slugging it out in the trenches.

* Consider this a Black-Friday-free zone.

We're not going to talk about the most over-hyped shopping day of the holiday season. (Statistically, it's not today, anyway.) We're not going to go into deep analysis of online shopping starting on Monday, which goes by a made-up name that Shall Not Be Spoken.

Okay, one item about Black Friday: Here's a great YouTube video from a local news report of a guy crying on camera because the store was sold out of what he wanted. I get the feeling this guy is having a little joke on the cameraman.

By Frank Ahrens  |  November 24, 2006; 11:10 AM ET  | Category:  Frank Ahrens
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Comments

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No we don't need to choose between HD-DVD or Blue-Ray. They could have come to an agreement, but they haven't.

There are still many of us that were casualties of the old Beta-VHS war that will sit on the sidelines until two things happen:1. The prices become reasonable. The pricepoint for such a device is between $200-$300. I'm not gambling with an $800 device. 2. A format is declared a winner.

Posted by: Kim | November 24, 2006 5:54 PM

The most disturbing thing about the Michael Richards tirade, is that Richards denied that he was a racist. It's human nature to believe that we are never at fault. That said, by definition a racist believes that his race is superior to others. Er, when you debase someone for "interrupting the white man," that could technically be considered racist. It would have been sufficient to smile and make some sort of sardonic comment towards the hecklers. That would have turned the audience against them. If that doesn't work, you can always have them removed. The incident reminds me of Al Cappone, who claimed that he was only helping his neighborhood; and Richard Nixon, who claimed "I am not a crook" when it appeared that he had orchestrated a heist at DNC headquarters. Michael Richards clearly needs some anger management and counselling. He's got to get his heart and mind right, then prove that he's not the bigot that he seemed to be in the infamous video clip. I was shocked and perturbed, but then again--who really knew Michael Richards as anyone except Kramer? In regards to the 7th season out on DVD, consumers will have to determine if they can distinguish Richards from Kramer.

Posted by: Dr. Don Key | November 24, 2006 7:09 PM

well, the end.

Posted by: Bill Forrest | November 24, 2006 9:38 PM

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