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A Final Thought From McCarran International Airport

Rob Pegoraro

LAS VEGAS - One promising HDTV technology on display at last year's CES has vanished from sight this year. Neither Canon nor Toshiba were showing off any of the screens based on SED (surface-conduction electron-emitter display) technology that they had displayed last year. A January ago, this system had been praised for combining the deep blacks and fast response times of plasma and the brightness of LCD. Where'd it go? The best guess: The tumble in flat-panel prices will make the first, inevitably expensive round of SED screens look pricey in comparison, so somebody needs to hack away at those costs


Another TV-tech contender - one so far confined to the tiny screens of cell phones and other portable devices - may be getting closer to commercial reality. Sony demonstrated some beautiful prototype OLED (organic light-emitting diode) screens, in 11- and 27-inch sizes. Their depth of color was unmistakable - Sony touted a million-to-one contrast ratio - but the amazing thing here was the extreme thinness of these sets. I took a ruler to the side of one of the 11-inch models: it was 1/8th of an inch thick. You could tape this screen to the inside of a cabinet door.

By Rob Pegoraro  |  January 11, 2007; 5:00 PM ET  | Category:  CES 2007 , Rob Pegoraro
Previous: A WTWP Recap of Tech Week | Next: Your Very Own CES Podcast


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OLED is the future display generation!
All about OLED-technology and OLED products at http://www.oled-display.net

Posted by: erik | January 12, 2007 12:38 AM

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