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Watching Tiny Screen Without Going Crosseyed

Portable devices keep getting smaller, yet people want to get more entertainment right to the two-inch screen on their iPod or cellphone. A company called MyVu is selling futuristic-looking glasses that let you watch a movie or play a video game on what seems like a bigger screen.


Here's how it works: You plug in the MyVu glasses, which look a bit like 3-D glasses or something you'd see in a StarTrek episode. Then the movie you want to watch is displayed in front of you, as if you're looking at a full screen. In-ear earphones are attached so you can listen to what you're watching.


A demonstrator tries out the MyVu

Rebecca MacQuarrie, the company's marketing manager, told me she's trying to market to younger generations that download constantly and have their devices with them 24-7. You can also hook up a video game--Guitar Hero, perhaps--and rock out by yourself. Business travelers are also a target market--so people can watch a movie on the plane without starting at a tiny screen for hours.

By Kim Hart  |  January 7, 2008; 2:40 PM ET  | Category:  CES 2008 , Kim Hart
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This was introduced last year. Pretty cool as you can also see beyond the image to allow you to walk, chew bubblegum, and watch and listen to your video podcasts.

Posted by: itseugene | January 7, 2008 5:46 PM

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