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Speaker Pelosi backs FCC plan to assert broadband oversight: report

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in an interview with bloggers Tuesday that she supports the Federal Communications Commission's plan to redefine broadband as a telecommunications service, according to the blog Fire Dog Lake, The Seminal.

"Reclassification, net neutrality, universal access for every American, these are priorities for us. And we see it not in isolation but as part of a new propserity, as a job creator, to make America healthier, smarter and an international leader," Pelosi said, according to left-leaning site.

Her comments come after a barrage of bipartisan opposition to FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski's plan to reclassify broadband -- a move that will begin to take shape at the agency's next meeting June 17. Pelosi said a bill to stop the FCC's push for net neutrality rules and the expansion of broadband Internet connections wouldn't happen on her watch.

By Cecilia Kang  |  June 2, 2010; 8:00 AM ET
 
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Comments

Net neutrality is super important. Allowing broadband providers to be anything but neutral in transmitting bits is crazy.

Imagine the Telephone company not allowing you to call certain numbers? Imagine if a subsidiary of Disney ran your ISP and wouldn't let you watch movies made from another studio, or degraded the experience? Imagine if Fox News owned your ISP and blocked what they decided were "socialist" supporting websites??

Let the World Wide Web alone! This isn't China!

Posted by: thebobbob | June 2, 2010 1:09 PM | Report abuse

Way to go Madam Speaker. We need some protection from corporate corruption and greed. We also need broadband for all. Some of us have waited more than a decade for greedy phone company to provide service in all areas.

Posted by: jimbobkalina | June 3, 2010 3:30 AM | Report abuse

nancy pelosi - keep your hands off of the private sector. get this fascist intrusion out of our lives. i can't wait until you're defeated in november. you will either be out of a job or in the minority in the house and no longer speaker.

PINK SLIPS FOR PINKOS!

Posted by: NewLibertarian | June 4, 2010 2:55 AM | Report abuse

Speaker Pelosi should recognize that perhaps given all of the legal uncertainty and industry opposition to the FCC’s expansion of its own authority via the third way, it might be time for Congress to intervene at this point. There is no way the FCC will be able to make Universal Service reform, spectrum allocation and universal broadband adoption all priorities with the reclassification issue hanging over its head

Posted by: JenebaSpeaks | June 4, 2010 1:12 PM | Report abuse

Broadband is essential to our growth as a nation. As Congress and the FCC consider the means to move broadband access and adoption forward and maintain an open Internet, they need to ensure that everyone has the opportunity to participate and innovate.

Posted by: k377 | June 4, 2010 2:29 PM | Report abuse

As the June 17th FCC meeting draws nearer, political influencers supporting net neutrality, and the media that give them platforms, are becoming alarmingly more general in tone and cadence. This pattern is likewise reflected by Speaker Pelosi’s referencing net neutrality and “universal access for all Americans” in the same sentence. I would love to hear Speaker Pelosi respond to the factually supported idea that net neutrality will actually create just the opposite of universal access to broadband services for all Americans. I’d also like to her her thoughts on what net neutrality will mean for underserved and non-served communities who will likely have to bear the brunt of the costs associated with providing “universal access for all Americans.”

Posted by: DLWhite | June 4, 2010 3:06 PM | Report abuse

I guess House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Democrat of California, needs to check the house hopper before she claims that movement against the concept of net neutrality will not be sustained “on her watch.”

During her watch as house speaker, and for at least a decade prior to that, the Congress has made it clear that a “hands off” policy towards the Internet is appropriate and necessary for its growth. It is probably for this reason that HR 3458, the Internet Freedom Preservation Act of 2009, has been sitting in the House energy and commerce committee since the summer of 2009.

HR 3458, sponsored by Ed Markey, Democrat of Massachusetts, would introduce the very net neutrality principles that Mrs. Pelosi allegedly supports. The question is, why support them now and not less than a year ago? What has changed?

If Mrs. Pelosi was serious about universal access to broadband, especially for minority, rural, unserved, and underserved areas, she would have thrown her support behind the more reasonable measures in Florida Democrat Representative Kendrick Meek’s HR 691, which would have provided a credit against income tax for businesses furnishing broadband services to rural and underserved areas.

Before worrying about what will not be sustained on her watch, maybe Mrs. Pelosi should worry about sustaining a consistent position.

Posted by: altondrew | June 4, 2010 4:42 PM | Report abuse

Ms. Pelosi seems to forget the legal history of this issue. In 1996, Congress established the separation of "telecommunication services" and "information services." The Supreme Court has upheld this decision, as well as identified what findings must be met to change such policy. These conditions have not been met; therefore the FCC does not have the authority to make these changes.

Posted by: evelyn10 | June 6, 2010 1:34 PM | Report abuse

Ms. Pelosi seems to forget the legal history of this issue. In 1996, Congress established the separation of "telecommunication services" and "information services." The Supreme Court has upheld this decision, as well as identified what findings must be met to change such policy. These conditions have not been met; therefore the FCC does not have the authority to make these changes.

Posted by: evelyn10 | June 6, 2010 1:35 PM | Report abuse

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