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High-tech jobs up slightly, showing glimmers of recovery

The high-tech industry added 30,200 jobs in the first half of 2010, showing glimmers of recovery after job losses over the last year, according to data analyzed by trade group TechAmerica.

The group said the number of total high-tech industry jobs reached 5.78 million jobs in June 2010, up 0.5 percent from January. But total jobs were still down from 18 months ago, when the nation’s economic recession rippled into the high tech sector. In January 2009, high-tech manufacturing, communications and software services and engineering jobs were employing nearly 6 million people.

“Though the tech industry was among the last to feel the effects of the economic downturn of 2008–2009, it was not immune to job loss and is only slowly showing signs of climbing out of it,” said Josh James, vice president of research for the TechAmerica Foundation. “Continued recovery is by no means certain.”

TechAmerica’s report was based on Labor Statistics data.

Drilling down:

  • Tech manufacturing employment was up 0.7 percent, or 9,100 jobs, to 1.24 million.
  • Software services added 14,200 jobs and tech services added 29,700 jobs.
  • Communications services jobs were down 22,800 jobs.

By Cecelia Kang  |  September 14, 2010; 12:34 PM ET
 
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Comments

With this small increase I think it is important to suspend the H1-B and L-1 visas, many of the 99ers are highly trained IT workers. I know many here in Silicon Valley and it's time stop filling openings with workers from other countries. It is in our national interest to develop the american people with the best skills possible, including "would you like fries with that". Enter level jobs are important to our newest generation. I worked in the lunch room at school, which we need more and better. Then delivered papers, now adults do these jobs that allowed me to become a solid member of the american working class. We all know that a job makes a big difference in a poor persons life. I assure you that the small sums that are paid to the unemployed are well worth the investment, perhaps we need a job seekers allowance for those truly looking for work. Many that have suffered from the bankers mistakes never get a dime, but loss of a family business! Making indentured servants out of our newest generation with student loans they many never be able to repay is not the way. I would suggest that every company that wants to bring a worker from another country sponsor one American child in the same field with employment when they graduate. Further more all work visa should pass though the state EDD so that they can identify an america worker for the job before the visa is granted. We live in very difficult times and do not need another civil war my friends. My family lost far to much in the last one and it is something I fear most. You can go ahead and plant your head firmly in the sand, but I assure other parts of your body are exposed. Think twice before you say "Let them eat cake", perhaps you have no idea as Marie who truly believed cake was available to all the French people. Never forget that america comes in three parts, English, French and Spanish. All must be respected including Lakotas, Navajo, and all the other nations in our country. They have fought for America in many wars. I know a Lakota named two bears, he was sniper in Vietnam, keep many from dying. Perhaps it would be good to train the Lakota, Navajo tribes IT work, I know they can do it along with the rest of America's workers. Perhaps George Carlin is right we are not even in this game, forget it.

Posted by: thurberdog | September 15, 2010 1:00 AM | Report abuse

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