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Net neutrality off plate at FCC meeting, but musicians bring out the waffles

stipe.jpg

The Federal Communications Commission is meeting right now, and net neutrality isn't on the agenda.

But don't tell that to R.E.M, Bonny Raitt, Moby or the public interest group Free Press.

Musicians are asking fans on Twitter, Facebook and fan sites to tell FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski to proceed with an order on how Internet service providers treat content on their networks. Those musicians, with Free Press, MoveOn.org Political Action and Future of Music Coalition, launched the campaign as the agency takes comments until early November on a net neutrality rule.

And to get the attention of communications regulators, Free Press volunteers and staff passed out waffles in front of the agency Thursday ahead its monthly meeting. The message to Genachowski was not to "waffle" on his net neutrality promises. They want a rule that would require broadband service providers -- including mobile service firms -- to treat all content equally on their networks. They also don't want carve-outs that would allow for paid priority for some channels and services on networks.

latest-waffle-activists.jpg


top photo: Michael Stipe, R.E.M.
credit: IMG

bottom photo: Free Press waffle campaign
credit: Free Press

By Cecilia Kang  | September 23, 2010; 12:32 PM ET
Categories:  FCC, Facebook, Net Neutrality  
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Next: FCC approves 'white spaces' for unlicensed mobile broadband

Comments

Leave it to Cecilia Kang, Google's reporter at the Post, to conveniently fail to mention that these are Google's "astroturf" lobbyists, or that they are lobbying for onerous regulation of the Internet that would harm the public but help Google.

Posted by: LBrettGlass | September 23, 2010 12:55 PM | Report abuse

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