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White House to announce $5 million science, math, tech education initiative

The White House Thursday afternoon will announce a $5 million nonprofit initiative led by high-tech CEOs aimed at bringing more math and science education programs to high-need schools.

Change the Equation, founded by former astronaut Sally Ride, Intel Chairman Craig Barrett, Xerox CEO Ursula Burns, Time Warner Cable CEO Glenn Britt and Eastman Kodak CEO Antonio Perez, will support science summer camps for girls, professional development for math teachers and programs to encourage more children to enter take AP math and science courses. The program is supported by 100 business executives, with funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

The initiative is part of a larger effort by the administration and tech industry to improve Science, Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) education in the United States so that the nation remains globally competitive in those sectors. The administration's $4 billion Race to the Top education reform competition also includes STEM education programs.

The president’s Council of Advisers in Science and Technology also will announce programs aimed at recruiting and training 100,000 new STEM teachers and creating 1,000 new STEM-focused schools over the next decade.

By Cecilia Kang  |  September 16, 2010; 9:50 AM ET
 
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Comments

Another waste of our tax dollars in a sham by the Federal government pertaining to education. As shown in an article by Robert Weissberg, dated September 8, 2010, " Our "commitment" to academic excellence is a cruel joke -- we love stupidity and hate smart kids." Both parties do not like gifted kids. Currently the U.S. is living off imported brain power. That will change as other countries are wising up and offering more incentives for their brightest to stay home. Sometime around the 2030 time frame, the U.S. is going to be sooooo screwed economically because of our wasteful "education" spending that has little to do with real education, and more to do with political correctness.

Posted by: moonwatcher2001 | September 16, 2010 2:55 PM | Report abuse

$5 million? 1/8 of 1% of the $4 billion Race to the Top allocation? And the rest of world laughs at our 'commitment'....

Posted by: dwelden | September 16, 2010 3:06 PM | Report abuse

Also, STEM is a joke. I read another article that used real data instead of good sounding platitudes, that showed we graduate about the right number of science and engineering grads already. The problem is trying to convince kids to go into these fields when they rightly see that those fields are not valued as much as the easy money made gambling on Wall Street. Why study the hard sciences and engineering when you can go into the financial field and make more money doing less work and be home by 5 PM every night?

Posted by: moonwatcher2001 | September 16, 2010 3:06 PM | Report abuse

Who decided, and when, that AP courses are the end-all and be-all to a rigorous high school education? What about all of the excellent programs that exist that are not AP (i.e. IB courses, special studies, dual-enrollment college courses, etc.) What are we telling our students who are not enrolled in AP classes?

Focusing on high school AP courses leaves a large portion of talented and interested students out of the "equation" resulting in a rigorous and personally rewarding education. Students should be able to perceive the reward of learning, not be aiming for a grade, or taking a class because it will elevate their GPA.

Posted by: kgculbertson | September 16, 2010 5:54 PM | Report abuse

A good idea. However, this money may be water inside a porous basket if the teachers to be use for achiving this good aim did not have experience in fields of science specialization in industry before becoming teachers.

Posted by: mczonkwa1 | September 18, 2010 11:37 AM | Report abuse

A good idea. However, this money may be water inside a porous basket if the teachers to be use for achiving this good aim did not have experience in fields of science specialization in industry before becoming teachers.

Posted by: mczonkwa1 | September 18, 2010 11:38 AM | Report abuse

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