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Posted at 10:12 AM ET, 11/22/2010

Viacom to Google TV: no MTV for you

By Cecilia Kang

Viacom said Monday that it has blocked full-length episodes of shows it runs on the Internet to users of Google TV, becoming the fifth television programmer to withhold content on the search engine's new Internet television platform.

Viacom, which owns MTV, Comedy Central and BET, said Internet users can still access its shows on its Web sites through desktop computers. But users of Google TV, a platform that combines regular TV with a Web browser, aren't able to find those Internet shows through the company's new service.

Viacom said it is evaluating how to turn Google's TV platform into a business opportunity. It wouldn't elaborate on the decision.

“We’re blocking access to our full episode content from Google TV’s Web browser," the company said in a statement. "We continue to evaluate Google TV to identify opportunities where it may make sense to optimize our Web content for the platform.”

Viacom joins ABC, NBC, CBS and Fox, who have all blocked Internet versions of their shows to Google TV users. None of the programmers have explained how they are doing so, but analysts and experts believe the companies have been able to identify properties in the Chrome browser used for Google TV to block their programs from being shown to those users.

Google said it believes network operators will eventually see new business models and opportunities emerge from Internet television distributors like itself. Google said it has been in talks with networks to allow Google TV users to access the Web-based shows.

Related stories:
Networks block Web based shows on Google TV

Internet TV battles come to head at FCC

By Cecilia Kang  | November 22, 2010; 10:12 AM ET
Categories:  FCC, International, Online Video  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Q&A with OpenDNS: We're being blocked, FCC should act on net neutrality
Next: Sen. Franken urges Justice to investigate Comcast antitrust violation

Comments

Wow. Every time is read the Post, I learn about another network blocking Google TV. Who is left to block?? So far, TV networks Fox, CBS, NBC, ABC, Comedy Central and MTV have all blocked their programming from Google TV, as has Hulu. At this point, they should suspend sales of this NON-product. Why would anyone want to pay $300 for a "TV" box that is blocked from so much programming?? You can get more channel from services like TVDevo.com or others. They're much easier to use, straightforward and carry a lot of TV shows both live and on-demand.

Posted by: meganbrod | November 22, 2010 2:14 PM | Report abuse

None of this is surprising. Google wants everyone on the Internet to be able to get everything for free... except for its advertising. It thus promotes not only piracy of intellectual property but products like Google TV, which encourage "cord cutting" and thus cut off the revenue streams that are needed to produce TV programs. It also gave huge contributions to the Obama campaign and transition, hoping to buy regulations that would prevent ISPs from managing their networks so as to rein in piggish users. (Word has it that the FCC may in fact try to impose these regulations just before Christmas.)

Of course, Cecilia Kang, Google's reporter at the Post, mentions none of this because she is promoting the interests of Google.

Posted by: LBrettGlass | November 22, 2010 3:15 PM | Report abuse

Nuke them limeys at Viacom! It's the only response.

Posted by: JONWINDY | November 22, 2010 4:28 PM | Report abuse

How sorrowful for the networks. Google Tv
is a non-threat. How about the people? I have never spoke to anyone who didnt want to watch what they want, let alone pay some ridulous price for it. Watch Hulu-a lot of the posturing right now is about what Hulu is goint to do, after lowering their prices--Take a look at the new Netflix annoucement? New pricing look familiar???

Posted by: squeezon | November 22, 2010 11:03 PM | Report abuse

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