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Posted at 8:36 AM ET, 02/ 2/2011

The Circuit: Egypt back online, Google vs. Microsoft, Intel's expensive chip error

By Hayley Tsukayama

LEADING THE DAY: Egyptian Web sites are back online Wednesday morning after being unplugged since Jan. 27. Renesys, an Internet monitoring company, posted that all major Egyptian ISPs appear to be back online at 11:30 a.m. Cairo time, about 4:30 a.m. Eastern time.

There are mixed reports on whether social networking sites such as Twitter are back online; a majority of reports seem to indicate that Twitter is still not working for mobile.

Google vs. Microsoft: Two tech giants are in a knock-down, drag-out fight over Google's accusation that Microsoft's Bing search engine is copying its algorithm from the Mountain View, Calif., company. Google has apparently been watching Bing's results for months and setting up test searches to build evidence that Bing is copying them. The back and forth started yesterday,
and escalated as Google posted its take on the situation, and Microsoft denied the claims to ZDNet.

Search Engine Land's Danny Sullivan, the first to post on the subject, suggested Google's timing was motivated by rising user concern and publicity over the quality of its search, and to steal the thunder from a big Bing press event on Feb. 1.

Intel's chip problem gets more expensive: Intel's original estimate of $700 million to fix its Sandy Bridge chipset flub is a distant memory, as new figures top $1 billion. According to Engadget, companies such as Dell, MSI and Alienware have all had to pull back computers with the faulty chipset and might have to delay upcoming releases until Intel's fix is complete.

Specialist's cautions about Manning ignored: A mental health specialist warned that Pfc. Bradley Manning -- the Army private accused of leaking information to Wikileaks -- should not have be deployed to Iraq, a recommendation that did not persuade Manning's immediate commanders. The Washington Post reported that an Army investigation has found that not only was Manning in a troubled mental state, but his commanders did not properly secure sensitive and classified documents.

TSA explores less intrusive body scanners: In response to privacy concerns, the TSA is looking into less intrusive body scanners, including those that highlight possible problems on a generic outline of a human body. The TSA began testing the new scanners on Tuesday at Las Vegas McCarran International Airport and will expand the program to Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International and D.C.'s Reagan National Airport "in the coming days." The Washington Post reported that the TSA will still use its controversial frisking methods if there is a concern over a scan.

By Hayley Tsukayama  | February 2, 2011; 8:36 AM ET
Categories:  Google, International, Microsoft, Social media, Twitter  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: The Circuit: Google helps Egyptians tweet, tech CEOs head to the White House, Android takes lead in smartphones
Next: Apple iPhone games for children rack up shocking bills

Comments

Intel's chip problem gets more expensive: Intel's original estimate of $700 billion to fix its Sandy Bridge chipset flub is a distant memory, as new figures top $1 billion. According to Engadget, companies such as Dell, MSI and Alienware have all had to pull back computers with the faulty chipset and might have to delay upcoming releases until Intel's fix is complete.

Don't you mean $700 million not $700 billion?

Posted by: stshafer | February 2, 2011 9:13 AM | Report abuse

"Should not have be deployed" ??

Time for a grammar checker?

Posted by: panamacanuck | February 2, 2011 10:23 AM | Report abuse

Intel's chip problem gets more expensive: Intel's original estimate of $700 billion to fix its Sandy Bridge chipset flub is a distant memory, as new figures top $1 billion. According to Engadget, companies such as Dell, MSI and Alienware have all had to pull back computers with the faulty chipset and might have to delay upcoming releases until Intel's fix is complete.

Don't you mean $700 million not $700 billion?

Posted by: stshafer | February 2, 2011 9:13 AM
=========================================
The actual quote is:

"Intel's original estimate of $700 million to fix its Sandy Bridge chipset flub is a distant memory, as new figures top $1 billion."

I recommend either more time reading the article or new glasses.

Posted by: krankyman | February 2, 2011 11:02 AM | Report abuse

The earlier a chip error is caught, the less expensive the remediation effort. Looks like Intel is handling this one rather well. Shouldn't take too long to re-spin the chip and get it out to OEMs.

Posted by: schafer-family | February 2, 2011 11:36 AM | Report abuse

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