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Posted at 8:28 AM ET, 02/14/2011

The Circuit: Mobile World Congress, Zynga worth $7 billion, court rules cellphone is a computer

By Hayley Tsukayama

LEADING THE DAY: The Mobile World Congress is in full swing in Barcelona, offering companies the chance to show off new products and technologies. Verizon Wireless, for example is showing off its Voice Over LTE technology, affirming the company's move toward switching to an IP-based infrastructure. Other big announcements expected today include an address from Microsoft's Steve Ballmer on the Windows Phone 7.

Zynga valued at over $7 billion: The game company Zynga, known mostly for its Facebook games such as Farmville, Cityville and Mafia Wars, is reportedly in discussions to raise $250 million in funding, at a valuation of $7 billion to $9 billion. According to the Wall Street Journal, potential investors believe the company will go public within the next two years. Several Web-based startups such as Facebook and Twitter are expected to go public in the next few years -- some, such as LinkedIn and Pandora have already filed recent paperwork to go public.

Eighth Circuit rules cellphone a computer: The 8th Circuit has ruled that a Motorola RAZR is, by law, considered a computer, according to New Orleans City Business. Engadget points out that the ruling highlights the fact that Congress, perhaps, should reevaluate its definition of a computer. Right now the definition of a computer as "an electronic, magnetic, optical, electrochemical, or other high speed data processing device performing logical, arithmetic, or storage functions," could apply to sophisticated kitchen appliances.

Groupon back in hot water: Groupon faced the ire of some customers after offering a Valentine's Day deal with FTD for $20 off a $40 purchase. Some said the flower prices were inflated and that the coupon saved them nothing. As the Associated Press reported, the companies denied that the prices had been raised but is offering refunds to any dissatisfied customers. It's been a bad few weeks for the group discount site, which recently pulled its latest advertising campaign because of customer complaints.

Google tells Ghonim to come back anytime: After Wael Ghonim said that he would return to work at Google if the company would have him back, a message affirming the company's support for him appeared on Google's Twitter feed.

The Google executive emerged as a leading figure in the 18-day riots that ended the decades-long reign of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.

We're incredibly proud of you, @Ghonim, & of course will welcome you back when you're ready - cf. http://goo.gl/2BDGpless than a minute ago via web

By Hayley Tsukayama  | February 14, 2011; 8:28 AM ET
Categories:  Facebook, Google, International, Microsoft, Verizon  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Broadcasters' top evangelist, a hurdle in Obama national wireless plan
Next: Senate Judiciary names Franken head of new privacy, tech subcommittee

Comments

The Motorola RAZR? Dude, what is this 2004?

Posted by: ozpunk | February 18, 2011 2:50 PM | Report abuse

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