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Posted at 2:05 PM ET, 03/ 1/2011

Christopher Dodd to lead the Motion Picture Association of America

By Hayley Tsukayama

Former senator Christopher Dodd has been named the head of the Motion Picture Association of America.

According to a press release from the MPAA, Dodd will assume his position on March 17.

"I am truly excited about representing the interests of one of the most creative and productive industries in America, not only in Washington but around the world,” said Dodd in a statement. “The major motion picture studios consistently produce and distribute the most sought after and enjoyable entertainment on earth. Protecting this great American export will be my highest priority.”

Dodd represented Connecticut for 30 years in the Senate and six in the House. He announced his retirement from the Senate last year, as he trailed in the polls for re-election.

The MPAA has been looking for a new head since former chairman Dan Glickman stepped down in 2009. Others said to have been considered for the job include former New Mexico governor Bill Richardson and former Nebraska senator Bob Kerrey.

The organization has been struggling in recent years with budget cuts and shifts in power. Most major movie studios are now parts of larger corporate conglomerates. Meanwhile, independent filmmakers have also been a growing voice in the industry. Overall, that's a difficult place for the MPAA.

Todd Flournoy, a former MPAA government affairs executive and current entertainment lobbyist, told The Washington Post on Thursday, "The more savvy candidates realize that it's a fairly complicated dance. They're beholden to a much more complicated set of pulls and pushes."

Members of the MPAA seem confident that Dodd can navigate the new industry. In the press release, Barry Meyer, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Warner Bros. said, “Chris Dodd not only has the political instincts and experience, but he’s the right person to lead the film industry through its toughest challenges regarding content protection and piracy on a domestic and global scale.”

By Hayley Tsukayama  | March 1, 2011; 2:05 PM ET
 
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Comments

As America is now controlled by the lawless from politics and Wall Street and nwo the rats are jumping ship to the Media/Entertainment industry, I guess asking how these creeps stay out of jail is rhetorical. Joining the lobbying ranks is a reversal for Mr. Dodd, who last year told The Connecticut Mirror that he was not interested in influence peddling. (“No lobbying, no lobbying,” he was quoted as saying.) Asked last July on “Imus in the Morning” whether he would hit the road for other Senatorial candidates, Mr. Dodd said: “No. I don’t think anybody wants me campaigning for them.”

Posted by: dukeameye3 | March 1, 2011 3:05 PM | Report abuse

How does this happen?? WHy is not anyone of these creeps in jail??!!

Joining the lobbying ranks is a reversal for Mr. Dodd, who last year told The Connecticut Mirror that he was not interested in influence peddling. (“No lobbying, no lobbying,” he was quoted as saying.) Asked last July on “Imus in the Morning” whether he would hit the road for other Senatorial candidates, Mr. Dodd said: “No. I don’t think anybody wants me campaigning for them.”

Posted by: dukeameye3 | March 1, 2011 3:06 PM | Report abuse

Dodd is used to spinning the truth.
This will be a great job since he is a story teller used to dealing in fiction while trying to use it as the truth.

Posted by: MichaelLittleBig | March 1, 2011 4:00 PM | Report abuse

The perfect place for him. A liberal constituency peddling influence for money.

Posted by: VaBroker | March 1, 2011 4:32 PM | Report abuse

We can only hope he does to Hollywood and the movie industry what he did to this country financially.

Posted by: Desertdiva1 | March 1, 2011 5:15 PM | Report abuse

I hope Dodd moves to La La land. We had enough of him in CT

Posted by: mct1 | March 1, 2011 5:32 PM | Report abuse

Thank goodness he is no longer overseeing the country's finances.

Now if he can only find a position for Barney Frank and give the country a few years to recover...

Posted by: RandyM1 | March 1, 2011 5:45 PM | Report abuse

Will he get a 'sweetheart" deal on a mortgage....er, movie tickets? Maybe he can start making drunken 'waitress sandwiches' again, although he will have to find a replacement for good 'ol Ted Kennedy (who is tied up indefinitely in a very warm place).

Posted by: DaMan2 | March 1, 2011 5:57 PM | Report abuse

Just another productive element of the US that Dodd can run into the ground.

PS Sounds like he hasn't heard of video games.

Posted by: gbooksdc | March 1, 2011 7:21 PM | Report abuse

I knew the bankers would take care of their protector and minion Chris Dodd. It is interesting to that there really is a connection between Wall Street, large banks and the movie industry.

Posted by: npsilver | March 1, 2011 10:03 PM | Report abuse

Personally, I liked another story that included "New Hollywood lobbyist Dodd targets
'looting'" Now that's something he has experience with.

Posted by: tnvret | March 2, 2011 12:31 AM | Report abuse

You know, I thought I saw him walking down K Street yesterday saying "I'm a rich'in".

Posted by: UncleLeo | March 2, 2011 5:41 AM | Report abuse

Hopey and changey! YAY

Posted by: ArlingtonHokie | March 2, 2011 6:59 AM | Report abuse

Unbelievable how crooked politicians thrive and survive. I guess they have lots of chips to cash when they need to.

Posted by: thehamptons1 | March 2, 2011 8:55 AM | Report abuse

I can't think of a more appropriate "sorry" individual to lead such a "sorry" organization.

Birds of a feather...........

Posted by: dswift11 | March 2, 2011 10:56 AM | Report abuse

Realistically Dodd should be on trial for his crimes against the American people. The legislation that carries his name has caused massive damage to our financial and housing markets. So what does Hollywood do? They hire him. Not a good move if you want to be tainted with his legacy. I hope he does to them what he has done to the American economy.

Posted by: Desertdiva1 | March 2, 2011 11:26 AM | Report abuse

Last year Chris Dodd insisted he would not become a lobbyist after leaving the Senate.

Chris, if you are reading this, I now regret casting my vote for you, I want it back. I'm glad you're gone.

Posted by: Trakker | March 2, 2011 5:39 PM | Report abuse

Why not appoint him to run the Mars space shuttle? Would keep him out of circulation.

Eliminating legal accountability reinforces corruption as norm.

Disastrous if the pervasive powerlessness Americans feel.

Posted by: snocapmom | March 2, 2011 5:59 PM | Report abuse

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