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Centreville, Falls Church Name Football Coaches

While football coach at Fairfax, Chris Haddock was eager for the short-handed Rebels to exit the Concorde District to return to the less grueling Liberty.

Haddock’s Concorde-free honeymoon lasted one season. On Wednesday, he was named coach at Centreville, where he once again will tangle with many of the top teams in the Virginia AAA Northern Region while trying to restore a once-winning program.

Falls Church also named a new football coach Wednesday, hiring Stafford assistant Said Aziz. Haddock and Aziz were the sixth and seventh new region coaches named since the end of the 2009 season, and Fairfax will make an eighth.

Haddock, a 1988 Chantilly graduate and former 10-year assistant there, including on the 1996 Division 6 state championship team, has lived in the Centreville area about all his life. Despite the Wildcats’ 4-16 dip the past two seasons, including the first losing seasons in the 20 years the team has played a Northern Region schedule, he believes Centreville can return to prominence in a district that includes Westfield, Oakton, Chantilly and Robinson.

“It’s certainly in my opinion one of the elite programs in the area,” said Haddock, who plans to meet with his new team Thursday. “I’ve spent a good bit of my career [coaching] against [Centreville] and consider them to be a talented group and great school and great community. I think they have all the ingredients for great success.”

From 1991 through 2005, Centreville went 127-42 with 11 playoff appearances and a Division 6 state title in 2000. The Wildcats went 10-21 in three years under Gerry Pannoni, who was hired the same year that Haddock took over at Fairfax. Nine of the 21 losses were by seven points or fewer, and Centreville played as many as 15 sophomores last season.

Fairfax was coming off back-to-back 1-9 seasons when Haddock took over in 2007. His first two teams went 2-8 and 4-6 and then went 6-5 last season after the return to the Liberty. That marked the Rebels’ first winning record or playoff berth since 1999. The five losses were to teams that finished with a combined 53-14 record.

At Falls Church, Aziz takes over for Anthony Parker, who left to become head coach at Edison.

Aziz, a 1998 Lee graduate, assisted at James Wood and Lee and followed former Lee coach Chad Lewis to Stafford for a four-year stint there. In one of those small-world coaching moves, Aziz leaves Lewis to take over Falls Church, whose coach left to replace Chad’s father, Vaughn Lewis, at Edison.

Aziz grew up in this country but is hoping that his Afghan background appeals to potential Falls Church players.

“I’m a very culturally diverse person, and Falls Church is a very culturally diverse school,” Aziz said. “I want to be a role model to athletes and students there on and off the field.”

Parker went 29-51 at Falls Church, including 6-4 in 2005, the Jaguars’ second winning season in 25 years. Last year’s team went 5-5.

Falls Church is one of four region teams that has not reached the playoffs since the first half of the 1990s or earlier. Stuart, T.C. Williams and Wakefield are the others.

The coaching changes since the end of last season: Jefferson (Ken Kincaid), Edison (Parker), Mount Vernon (Barry Wells), South Lakes (Andy Hill), Annandale (Mike Scott), Centreville (Haddock) and Falls Church (Aziz).

By Preston Williams  |  March 3, 2010; 1:45 PM ET
Categories:  AAA Concorde District , AAA National District , Centreville , Falls Church , Football , Northern Region  
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Comments

Haddock is an interesting choice. Terrible Head Coach at Fairfax but might do better at Centreville. Only time will tell.

Posted by: cjohnson2 | March 8, 2010 10:12 AM | Report abuse

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