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Archive: March 2006

Report from Final Four--Battle of the Bands

Outside the RCA Dome a little while ago, I ran into several members of the George Mason University pep band, who got to fly in and stay at a very nice hotel, courtesy of the NCAA (and therefore of CBS.) In exchange, they're doing all sorts of CBS appearances, from the early morning news program to the 7 p.m. local news in Washington, as well as appearing in a battle of the bands concert for the folks who are hanging out in downtown Indianapolis. You'll be proud to hear that the Mason band members I met are both diplomatic and...

By Marc Fisher | March 31, 2006; 6:18 PM ET | Comments (0)

Whose Passing Would Summon These Words?

Never before in my life has it been so hard for me to accept the death of any man as it has been for me to accept the death of Theodore Roosevelt. A pall seems to settle upon the very sky. The world is bleaker and colder for his absence from it. We shall not look upon his like again. -- John Burroughs The great American naturalist John Burroughs was so moved by the death of Teddy Roosevelt that he wrote those words. The quotation appears in the new book that tells the riveting story of TR's post-presidency exploration of...

By Marc Fisher | March 31, 2006; 7:02 AM ET | Comments (84)

Our Exuberant Mayor, Tony the Blogger

He doesn't post often, and his blog is far more diary than true blog, but D.C. Mayor Tony Williams, always something of a political mystery, is turning into an unusually open and fascinating dabbler in the art of the cyberconfessional. The mayor, flush with the confidence of a lame duck, has even opened his comment boards, which is unusually gutsy for a sitting, high-level official. Williams posts citizen emails, complaints and kudos alike. And most surprisingly and most satisfyingly, he's using the blog to vent. At the peak of the latest chapter in the baseball stadium soap opera, the mayor...

By Marc Fisher | March 30, 2006; 7:27 AM ET | Comments (8)

You Be the Assignment Editor

So I'm headed out to Indy later in the week to write about Mason mania, the Final Four phenomenon, and any other bits, alliterative or not, that I can find. Anything you all would like to read about that hasn't already been said a zillion times? Questions you'd like answered about George Mason, the NCAA, the meaning of the Final Four? You command, I report. Or something like that. All suggestions welcome....

By Marc Fisher | March 29, 2006; 12:28 PM ET | Comments (18)

I've Heard of Slow Baking But This is Ridiculous

Last time we checked in with Ken Rubotzky, one of those rare and devoted souls who dares to take on the District of Columbia bureaucracy, he was mired in the tangles of the Government That Says No. All Ken wanted to do was open a bakery in the dramatically underserved neighborhood of Petworth. But the D.C. government wouldn't stand for such insolence. For four years, Ken has fought the city, with his only goal being to bake cakes and serve them without hiding behind the thick bulletproof plexiglass walls that too often separate merchants from customers in the inner city....

By Marc Fisher | March 29, 2006; 7:18 AM ET | Comments (0)

Baseball? I Thought We'd Finished That Task

Sunday's rally to beat down the TV blackout of the Washington Nationals was a model of bipartisan, regional harmony, a rare sign of what politicians can do when they find themselves reasonably united with the public on an issue of widespread, if not exactly earthshattering, concern. Gathered at RFK Stadium were Repos and Dems from Virginia and Maryland--Virginia congressmen Tom Davis (R) and Jim Moran (D), Maryland state legislators Anthony Brown and Peter Franchot, and Virginia delegate Brian Moran--all seeking to pressure Comcast cable and Peter Angelos' Mid-Atlantic Sports Network into reaching a deal to televise the games of the...

By Marc Fisher | March 28, 2006; 12:49 PM ET | Comments (13)

Excuse Me, Sen. Allen, Before You Can Run for President, You Have to Deal with This Pesky Little Thing--An Election

It's so much fun to dream about an all-Virginia presidential race in '08--toothy Mark Warner slaying Hillary in the primaries and going on to meet the avuncular, Reaganesque George Allen in the New Dominion Sweepstakes. And the two gents are having a whale of a time in New Hampshire and Iowa, where Warner is trying out his appeal as the centrist who can break beyond the coastal, secular Democratic base and Allen is exploring ways to assure the conservative base of his fealty while also moderating his message for the larger national electorate. According to a New York Times piece...

By Marc Fisher | March 28, 2006; 7:01 AM ET | Comments (12)

Thanks, John, and How Tiny Washington Feels from Afar

Here's a raw and heartfelt thank you to the daily diarist of the national capital region, John Kelly, for so ably stepping in and making Raw Fisher the spot for his first try at this odd art. It's his Washington, and we're lucky to be able to peek inside every day in the Post to read John Kelly's take on what it's like to live here. He's of course welcome back here on the big blog anytime. Meanwhile, your crochety host has returned from a glorious week in cold, wet, snowy Arizona. Do not for a moment believe a word...

By Marc Fisher | March 27, 2006; 6:40 AM ET | Comments (23)

Mason. Indy. Whudathunkit?

As if the George Mason Patriots' improbable run weren't thrilling enough, the team today delivered two heartstopping endings, holding on in both regulation and overtime to put down a Connecticut squad that was the favorite to go all the way. And then: The crowd at the Abe Pollin Center, louder than anything you've ever heard at a Wizards game, was all too polite. There weren't even enough actual Mason students and alumni to swarm the floor. But out in Fairfax, thousands of mid-career professionals and semi-permanent students and continuing ed addicts and part-time faculty are suddenly confronted with the fact...

By Marc Fisher | March 26, 2006; 5:14 PM ET | Comments (22)

George Mason--Wasn't He President or Something?

This is it--it may not be fair and in fact it may be downright anti-intellectual, but this weekend is George Mason University's big shot to show the world and especially Virginia that it is a serious institution of higher learning, worthy of every bit as much state support as the legendary University of Virginia receives and every bit as much respect as the nation's top state universities. Mason President Alan Merten has been his school's great evangelist and salesman for years, and he's had all manner of evidence to make his case: Nobel laureates, an extraordinary faculty lured here from...

By Marc Fisher | March 25, 2006; 6:56 PM ET | Comments (19)

Plagiarists I Have Known

John Kelly here, with one last dispatch in place of the vacationing Marc Fisher. The news that conservative blogger Ben Domenech has resigned from his short-lived "Red America" blog on washingtonpost.com amid allegations of plagiarism, has me remembering an incident from my own college days. I was a freshman or sophomore and in a creative writing class. The class was filled with the sort of people you would expect, pale and soft English majors such as myself, waifish poetesses. Then there was Franco. Franco was a big, beefy,handsome jock-type guy. I took an instant dislike to him, especially since he...

By John Kelly | March 24, 2006; 5:19 PM ET | Comments (16)

Accidents Will Happen; Punishments Should

When a Fairfax County police SWAT team swooped in on Sal Culosi in January, they weren't meaning to kill the 37-year-old optometrist. They thought Culosi was a bookmaker and they wanted to arrest him. But somehow, Officer Deval Bullock's finger made contact with the trigger on his .45-caliber handgun. Officer Bullock shouted the word "police" at Culosi. "Right after "police,' " said Fairfax Commonwealth's Attorney Robert F. Horan Jr., "it went pow." Culosi was killed almost instantly. Yesterday Horan said Bullock will not be charged with a crime. Bullock did not intend to kill Culosi, so no crime was committed....

By John Kelly | March 24, 2006; 8:28 AM ET | Comments (52)

Bye-Bye Hecht's Warehouse

I'm not surprised. I knew it was coming. In fact, I even mentioned it in a column a while back. Having bought Hecht's, Federated Department Stores finds it doesn't want the distinctive art deco warehouse that has graced New York Avenue NE since 1937. You know what, though? It's probably better that they're selling it, since converting it to Macy's--as they're doing with many of the Hecht's stores--just wouldn't be right. I don't think I could ever bring myself to call it the "Macy's Warehouse." The term "Hecht's Warehouse" is ingrained in our collective brains from countless radio traffic reports....

By John Kelly | March 24, 2006; 6:14 AM ET | Comments (8)

Overwhelmed by Minutiae

A fully-cooked John Kelly here again, subbing again for Raw Fisher.... For the past two months there has been a yellow Post-It note stuck to the mirror above my dresser. It bears these cryptic markings: 1/8 56.50 12/10 40.00 11/9 40.00 I know what these digits mean, I just don't know when I'll get around to doing anything about them. The numbers show how much I paid for my cholesterol medication. It jumped from 40 bucks per bottle in November and December to $56.50 every month since then. Add up the increase, multiply by 12 and that's close to $200...

By John Kelly | March 23, 2006; 10:11 AM ET | Comments (22)

Journalist Discovers Blogging, Laughs

[The part of Marc Fisher will be played today by John Kelly.] Laughing. Chuckling. Giggling. And, yes, guffawing. These are some of the things I hear when I turn on my radio in the morning. For some reason, they remind me of blogging. I've been blogging for all of two days now, three if you count today. And I do, for it is respected journalistic practice to pronounce a trend after accruing only three examples. (See three women in culottes? It's a trend.) So today I'd like to share my inchoate blogging impressions. But first, that radio laughter. The standard...

By John Kelly | March 22, 2006; 7:55 AM ET | Comments (21)

Parental Guidance Suggested

[The part of Marc Fisher will be played today by John Kelly.] Kids! What's the matter with kids today? Parents, I've decided. They just don't get it. If you doubt me, look at Valerie Strauss's article about "millennial parents" in today's Post. It's about parents who are overly intrusive in their children's lives, parents who swoop in to badger and browbeat teachers at the slightest sign of crisis. That term--"millennial parents"--has a nice whiff of the apocalypse to it, and perhaps their rise does signal the End Times: You got your Four Horseman and you got your Back to School...

By John Kelly | March 21, 2006; 7:31 AM ET | Comments (86)

Belgian Endive for Tysons Corner?

What's to become of the Tysons Corner's auto dealers? Alec MacGillis has a front-page story today about how the plans for an elevated Metro line to Tysons will cut through Leesburg Pike--and some of the car showrooms Washingtonians have been flocking to for decades. Some dealers plan on redeveloping their showrooms, creating more urban style dealerships of the sort found in Manhattan, London and Paris. (Ooh la la!) Others think they might leave the business entirely. I love a nice auto showroom-ah the smell of rich Corinthian leather in the morning. But like a lot of Americans I always feel...

By John Kelly | March 20, 2006; 9:23 AM ET | Comments (18)

You're In Good Hands with Answer Man (It's His Washington)

Your raw but earnest correspondent will vanish from this here blog for a week to take care of some other matters, but have no fear, Raw Fisher will be manned around the clock and items will pop your way, courtesy of the Post's man about town, Mr. John Kelly. Yes, he of John Kelly's Washington, the bow-tied bard of the burbs (and the city too), will try his hand at blogging, right here on the big board, starting Monday. I've told him all about what kind and gentle souls you all are, and how you love the smell of napalm...

By Marc Fisher | March 17, 2006; 2:32 PM ET | Comments (0)

Castle Saved, Thanks to You

If you've dallied and still haven't seen the lush Victorian fantasy that is the Brewmaster's Castle, you've won a reprieve. Go. And if you've come to understand the importance of this landmark building near Dupont Circle, you get to share in the relief now being enjoyed by Gary Heurich, the grandson of the brewer Christian Heurich, who built the mansion. As I reported earlier this month, the castle has been threatened with foreclosure by the bank that holds its mortgage. But a robust response from Post readers and other supporters of the 19th century mansion has resulted in enough money...

By Marc Fisher | March 17, 2006; 11:44 AM ET | Comments (8)

And the Danes Are Saying, Hey, All We Did Was Print Some Cartoons!

Now don't all rush out and apply for Dutch citizenship, but according to this story, the government of the Netherlands has concluded that before one may seek citizenship in their fair land, you must be comfortable with viewing a topless woman walking toward you out of the sea and two gay men kissing in a park. So the Dutch have produced a film of just such scenes that all applicants for citizenship must buy and watch. I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that our country will not be doing this. Or maybe we already do....

By Marc Fisher | March 17, 2006; 7:38 AM ET | Comments (18)

Comcast Presents Nats Baseball, Color Commentary by Kendel Ehrlich

Stadium lease--check. Stadium design--check. Groundbreaking ceremony--coming soon. Team owner--coming soon. Really. After many months of brutal backstabbing and other political delights, things are finally starting to come together for baseball in Washington. With one ginormous exception: The worst TV deal in professional sports. The standoff between Peter Angelos' last weapon against Washington--his Mid-Atlantic Sports Network--and the folks at Comcast cable continues with no end in sight. Result: Most D.C. area viewers will get to see hardly any of the Nationals' 162 games this season. A dramatic cut in the number of games to be shown on broadcast TV, along with...

By Marc Fisher | March 16, 2006; 10:27 AM ET | Comments (0)

Ballpark Dreams and Street Realities

Today's column compares the beautiful drawings of the new Nationals stadium with the hard realities on the streets of Southeast Washington, and especially on S. Capitol Street, which shows up as a lovely, tree-lined boulevard on the computer graphics produced by the ballpark architects. In fact, for quite some years to come, Capitol Street near the stadium will remain a decrepit and off-putting relic of an era when pedestrians were the enemy and urban streets were designed solely to sweep suburbanites into and out of the city with the least possible contact with its residents. My Post colleague Jacqueline Dupree...

By Marc Fisher | March 16, 2006; 7:15 AM ET | Comments (0)

Oh, You Wanted to Sit Down While Flying the Friendly Skies?

Well, we went for the surcharge for speaking to a human being and we swallowed the extra charge for food on board airplanes, so now Northwest is testing to see if there's anything airline customers would actually balk at paying for. The airline announced its new "Coach Choice" program, which involves charging an extra $15 if you want one of those nifty aisle or exit-row seats. Turns out that Northwest is not the very first to do this. The Wall Street Journal reports that Virgin Atlantic sells its exit-row seats for $75 above the cost of other coach seats, and...

By Marc Fisher | March 15, 2006; 3:48 PM ET | Comments (12)

Ok, Maybe His Hair Was Orange

Stay with Raw Fisher for continuing coverage of Mark Warner's hair color...This just in...The New York Times corrects its magazine cover photo of Warner, in which the Virginia governor turned presidential candidate appeared not to have orange hair...Here's the correction in full: The cover photograph in The Times Magazine on Sunday rendered colors incorrectly for the jacket, shirt and tie worn by Mark Warner, the former Virginia governor who is a possible candidate for the presidency. The jacket was charcoal, not maroon; the shirt was light blue, not pink; the tie was dark blue with stripes, not maroon. The Times's...

By Marc Fisher | March 15, 2006; 8:46 AM ET | Comments (0)

Problem Solved: No More Traffic!

Isn't life just fabulous in Virginia now that the governor and legislators have completed this year's session of the General Assembly and settled that little road congestion problem? In less than three months, the lawmakers came together and raised the money and made the moves necessary to get everyone moving again. Oh wait. This just in: They didn't accomplish anything in Richmond this session, and now the governor has summoned his friends back to town starting March 27 to try again. The Republican leadership in Richmond protests that they did too accomplish great things during the session that ended Saturday....

By Marc Fisher | March 14, 2006; 7:52 AM ET | Comments (0)

Connie Simmons and Her Jazz World

UPDATE: Audio clips of Connie Simmons singing and talking about Washington are now linked to today's column--see the link immediately below. For more on the late jazz singer Connie Simmons, the subject of today's column, here's my 2000 piece from the Post Magazine on the jazz church in Southwest Washington, Westminster Presbyterian....

By Marc Fisher | March 14, 2006; 7:47 AM ET | Comments (0)

At Least His Hair Doesn't Look Like It Was Colored With Crayola Burnt Orange Crayons

So the New York Times Sunday magazine did a big story on our very own Mark Warner and there the ex-guv was, smiling rather too Botoxically on the cover, with way too much tooth showing. But the saving grace was that his skin somehow seemed more orange than his hair, which I guess is a step in the right direction. So either Warner has finally got his chemicals working better in the hair department, or the Times is having some unusual color registration issues over in what my grandparents used to call the rotogravure department. Anyway, the piece, engagingly written...

By Marc Fisher | March 13, 2006; 7:32 AM ET | Comments (0)

Gurgling Noises

The banging pipes and the gassy sounds are the return of liquid after a dry day and evening, welcome noises in houses where people get cranky without running, reliable water. Earlier, the scene at Safeway was almost reminiscent of a snow forecast, with the shelves cleaned out of water and, oddly, milk. The pictures on TV of the water gushing from under Chain Bridge down into the Potomac were dramatic, like a waterfall magically cascading from the bridge's roadbed. There was talk of bringing out a road inspector to check the bridge before reopening it to traffic, but somehow the...

By Marc Fisher | March 12, 2006; 11:38 PM ET | Comments (0)

Water, Water Nowhere

So the spring weather finally gets me off my duff to fill the basketball hoop base with water. I turn on the water to the outdoor faucets, unkink the hose, and the water gushes--for about 10 seconds. Then: A gurgling sound and...nothing. Surely, we've messed up our pipes, turned the wrong valve, done something to the House Gods, something that will cost two or three Household Units ($1,000 each). We open and shut every valve we can find. Still nothing. The water is gone. Bedeviled by the mystery, we wander outside, whereupon it becomes apparent that we are not alone....

By Marc Fisher | March 12, 2006; 5:37 PM ET | Comments (0)

Louise and the Kosher Korean Column

For those who might be curious to follow up on today's column on Louise Fisher, the cook and cooking teacher who leads forays into Asian supermarkets, here's Louise's site, which features recipes and information about her cooking classes. And here's the Korean supermarket chain, Han Ah Reum, which has stores in both Maryland and Virginia, as well as in the New York metro area....

By Marc Fisher | March 12, 2006; 11:35 AM ET | Comments (0)

You Be the Reporter: A Settlement in the Works?

Eagle-eyed reader Dan Stillman has noticed that the webstie www.washingtonnationalsapparel.com has vanished, raising the likelihood that negotiations between Major League Baseball and the little operation that had successfully staked a claim on the name of the Washington Nationals may be bearing fruit. You may recall that the company, Bygone Sports, last month won the right to register the team's name for the purposes of selling merchandise. This was such a devastating blow to baseball that the Nats were immediately thrown into the possibility that they'd have to find a new name. On top of all the other bad things happening...

By Marc Fisher | March 12, 2006; 8:38 AM ET | Comments (0)

Columns I Didn't Write This Week

Here's this week's list of columns I did not get around to writing: 1. Honesty in government: Virginia Delegate Bob Marshall told the Leesburg Today newspaper that he would pay no attention to a letter-writing campaign launched by the Loudoun Chamber of Commerce in support of new state funding for transportation improvements. Why ignore the chamber in his own home county? Easy: Because "the Loudoun Chamber didn't give me a dime for my reelection," Marshall said. "They didn't help me get elected so I have no obligation to them." Gotta love that kind of frank statement from an elected official....

By Marc Fisher | March 10, 2006; 7:44 AM ET | Comments (0)

Touched by a Judge

No jail time. No requirement that he resign from office. No fine. Not even a lecture from the judge. Not even a pro forma pronouncement that Marion Barry had disgraced his office, disrespected his constituents and ripped off the taxpayers. No, Marion Barry walked out of the U.S. District Courthouse in Washington this morning so relieved that when reporters asked him if he was surprised to get off with probation, he flashed a huge smile, laughed, and said, "I was pleased." To the glee of his entourage, Barry got off with probation after his conviction for having failed to...

By Marc Fisher | March 9, 2006; 3:14 PM ET | Comments (0)

Guess What City Managed to Turn Free Wifi into An Issue of Class?

Hint: It's not Philadelphia, which is moving to provide wireless access to the Internet throughout more than 100 square miles of the city, free to every resident. Nor is it Alexandria, which has already set up free wireless along the King Street corridor. No, it's the District of Columbia, which, while meaning well, now proposes to pit neighborhoods against one another by setting up a wireless Internet network that would be built in more affluent areas and in the poorest sections of town, but not necessarily in all poor areas and not necessarily in the mixed-income neighborhoods this mayor has...

By Marc Fisher | March 9, 2006; 7:38 AM ET | Comments (16)

Where Do You Summer? Verbs From Another Planet

I don't understand much about economics--I took the one intro course in 11th grade with Mr. Alexander and that wrapped it up for me--but I love reading those pieces in the business section that let you compare your own miserable finances to the gloom and doom facing the rest of the population. Sunday's package in the Post by Neil Irwin was your basic oh-my-God-we're-all-going-to-be-eating-cat-food-when-we're-old fright piece, but with bonus stats that frankly floored me. (Excellent graphic is in the dead trees edition only, not on the big web site, but the stats on which it's based are available here.) So...

By Marc Fisher | March 8, 2006; 2:15 PM ET | Comments (18)

Campus Dissolve: The Battle over Sugar's

Given its home in one of the most expensive neighborhoods on the East Coast, Georgetown University has never had much of a chance to develop a typical college retail strip with all-night eateries, bars, bookstores and coffee haunts. Instead, Hoyas have had to share the M Street corridor with neighborhood residents and a singles scene that serves the entire D.C. metro area. But at the corner of 35th and O, Sugar's Campus Store sits as a gloriously unrenovated reminder of college life of the mid-20th century, a barebones diner that only college kids and people who love their energy and...

By Marc Fisher | March 7, 2006; 7:09 AM ET | Comments (15)

Hearts Are Light, Men Are Laughing, Little Children Shout

That massive sigh of relief you can hear all across the Washington area tonight is the sense not only that the Nationals are now on firmer ground as a permanent institution in these parts, but also a hope that the District can move on beyond the needlessly polarizing politics of baseball. Even the greedheads of Major League Baseball could see that any effort to extend the uncertainty over the D.C. stadium lease would result in disaster--a lost chance to build a new neighborhood around the stadium, a significant and potentially longlasting deterioration of the Nats' fan base, and an extension...

By Marc Fisher | March 5, 2006; 6:18 PM ET | Comments (42)

Radio Wars--How A Baltimore Public Station Plans to Crush Washington's Last College Voice

Public radio's genteel, mellifluous image masks the sometimes vicious battles that are waged off the air. Today's Listener column explores the ongoing attempt by Baltimore's WYPR to expand its signal into Washington's Maryland suburbs, where the radio station run by students at the University of Maryland happens to use the same space on the dial where WYPR resides. The students at WMUC appear to be plain out of luck; they're unprotected by the FCC. Their only appeal is to public pressure, and they're supported in that effort by an impressively loyal group of station alumni, from NPR's Jay Kernis to...

By Marc Fisher | March 5, 2006; 8:55 AM ET | Comments (3)

Farewell to Suds--Foggy Bottom Bottoms Out

For folks coming to the blog from my piece in today's Business section, here's a quick link to our earlier discussion of Olde Heurich's departure from the Washington beer scene. Join the conversation on the comment boards after this blog item....

By Marc Fisher | March 3, 2006; 9:42 PM ET | Comments (5)

Department of Photo Security--Redux

Last Sunday's column told the story of a Maryland woman who was stopped by police and questioned after commuters saw her taking photographs of the wrought-iron lampposts at the Odenton train station. Preety Gadhoke's experience, and her questions about whether she was stopped because she looked like a foreigner, have sparked a debate here on the blog and elsewhere. Preety and I appeared on C-SPAN's Washington Journal with Brian Lamb this morning to discuss the events, and Channel 9 reporter Dave Statter passes along this account of his own dogged and enlightening reporting on the inconsistent, illogical and sometimes downright...

By Marc Fisher | March 3, 2006; 8:53 AM ET | Comments (33)

D.C. Schools Total Reform Plan #477

D.C. schools superintendent Clifford Janey's announcement this week of a Master Educational Plan sent me into a deja vu tizzy, and before I knew what had happened, I was swimming in huge piles of paper--the accumulated reports from a generation of schools chiefs, each purporting to lay out the comprehensive plan that would turn one of the nation's most troubled and difficult school systems into a gem, or at least into something that doesn't sentence children to life on the bottom rung of society. If you can stand it, follow me down memory lane: From the Post, May 27, 1989:...

By Marc Fisher | March 2, 2006; 6:56 AM ET | Comments (0)

Farewell, Olde Heurich! A Comeback Ends

It's a sad day in Foggy Bottom and in all of Washington, a day to hoist one to the memory of the old brewmaster Christian Heurich, to the glory days when every American city boasted its own breweries, to the idea that each place deserved its own taste. The Olde Heurich Brewing Company--successor to Washington's last surviving local brewery and maker of Foggy Bottom Ale, Old Georgetown and Senate beers--today announced its demise. (See president Gary Heurich's statement after the jump.) Olde Heurich--unlike the original Heurich, which closed in 1956 and had a massive plant on the site of what...

By Marc Fisher | March 1, 2006; 2:41 PM ET | Comments (0)

At Last! Trend Stories on the Decline of the Blog!

Well, you knew the blog was over as soon the big media boys got into the game. Here at Raw HQ, we made a formal announcement on Day One that our arrival would assure the completion of the phenomenon. Now come the dreaded trend stories reporting that blogs have peaked, nobody's reading us, the kids have moved on to flogging, etc. Remember, sports fans, actual facts can be superfluous in the construction of the perfect trend piece. You need your three strong anecdotes, your blisteringly perceptive quote from a Reliable Authority, and you're halfway home. This report from the obviously...

By Marc Fisher | March 1, 2006; 7:31 AM ET | Comments (0)

 

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