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Pants Update: The Pants Suit Goes Hollywood

Fans of the $65 million pants suit may want to check out tonight's episode of NBC's Law and Order, as the crime show presents "Bottomless," an episode in which, as NBC puts it, "The investigation into a pair of missing pants leads to the murder of a young lawyer."

I haven't seen the show, but early word is that the defense lawyer in the story is killed and the tale involves an affair of some sort. When Chris Manning, who defended the Chung family in last year's real-life D.C. saga, heard this, he quipped: "Wish I were the beneficiary of the affair and not the bullet!"

No word on whether ousted D.C. administrative law judge Roy Pearson, who filed the pants suit against his neighborhood dry cleaner, is depicted in the TV version.

If you watch the show, come on back and let us know how it comports with reality.

(Meanwhile, I have a call from a Korean TV company that wants to interview me for a documentary they're doing on the pants case. They want to know what the pants suit tells us about the meaning of American life. If there's anything you think I should say beyond, "Not a whole lot," please come ahead.)

9:40 PM UPDATE: The TV writers changed Pearson to a weaselly and apparently affluent white guy and threw in a murder and an extended and convoluted slam against a corrupt, thinly-veiled Wal-Mart called Savings Mart. The Chungs were portrayed as stammering, clueless, befuddled immigrants. And the writers couldn't resist the same Johnny Cochran tribute that so many of us who wrote about the suit case played with during the trial last spring:
"If the pants fit, you must acquit." Bottom line: The writers clearly concluded the pants suit could not sustain a full hour of television entertainment--and it needed a homicide and a corporate scandal to fill an hour of prime time. Also: The original $65 million demand by Pearson was apparently judged not believable, so they changed that to $20 million.

By Marc Fisher |  January 16, 2008; 3:11 PM ET
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Comments

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You should say, "In America we have crazy people too."

Posted by: WDC | January 16, 2008 5:23 PM

I would say that one can achieve a certain amount of fame
from the stupidest of acts wether one is a blonde heiress
or an incredibly mean spirited city employee with a law degree

Posted by: pat bahn | January 16, 2008 6:28 PM

Marc - I think you should ask what excuse Pearson should use when he files suit against NBC for stealing his idea.

Posted by: jj | January 16, 2008 7:18 PM

Marc - I think you should ask what reason Pearson should use when he files suit against NBC for stealing his idea.

Posted by: jj | January 16, 2008 7:19 PM

Marc - I think you should ask what reason Pearson should use when he files suit against NBC for stealing his idea.

Posted by: jj | January 16, 2008 7:21 PM

sorry for the triple post!

Posted by: jj | January 16, 2008 7:28 PM

The first thing I saw was that Pearson changed color.........

Posted by: Ron | January 17, 2008 1:19 AM

The Chung family is now telling their story in an online video - http://www.iamlawsuitabuse.org/stories/story.asp?s=43254

Posted by: vandorn | January 17, 2008 11:46 AM

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