Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
Special Features
TimeSpace: Half A Tank
TimeSpace: Half A Tank

Post photographer Michael Williamson is traveling across the country covering the economic situation.

In Union, A Choice Between Baby And Car

Street1.jpg

Residents of Union, West Virginia line Main Street before the start of the Farmers' Day parade. Photo by Michael Williamson/The Washington Post

UNION, W. Va.--Every year for the last four, James Dunbar has driven his 1972 electric green Dodge Dart in the annual Farmers' Day parade. This year, he watched from the sidewalk, cradling the reason he sold the car.

“She comes before anything,” he said of his six-month-old daughter, Payton, who clung to his sleeveless arms.

James and his wife April had tried to conceive for five years before Payton came into their lives, bringing with her both the blessing they had hoped for and the financial strain they didn’t need. To care for Payton, April said she had to take a leave from her job as a chef manager at Hardees. Since then, the sole income for the family, which includes a 12-year-old son, has come from James’ work at a home for the disabled. When there wasn't enough money to buy Payton a car seat, James let go of the car he had owned since 1997.

Street6.jpg

A shaft of sunshine breaking through an awning lights the face of 6-month-old Payton Elizabeth Dunbar along the Farmers' Day parade route. Photo by Michael Williamson/The Washington Post

The Dart had $2,000 worth of paint on it – “People said it shined so bad, they had to go like that,” James said, shielding his eyes from an imaginary light – and he sold the car for $1,200.

"Just let her go," James said.

“Was it hard?” I asked.

"Not for her it wasn’t,” he said, propping up Payton. “I just let her go."

Street4.jpg

The vintage auto show was held in the parking lot of the Union Volunteer Fire Department. Photo by Michael Williamson/The Washington Post

It’s hard to tell if Union has been slapped more softly by the recession or if its residents are just able to grin and bear it more than elsewhere. Are they injured cowboys downplaying the pain? Or have they benefited from living in the same place their grandfathers did, inheriting not only the house but lessons learned during the Depression?

When Michael and I spoke to most people here about the economy, they described subtle changes between their pre-recession and post-recession lives.

Street7.jpg

Bobby Smith, aka Honky Tonk Hank, pauses during his performance of Johnny Cash songs at the Farmers' Day Festival. Photo by Michael Williamson/The Washington Post

“We’re country boys,” said Robert Ferguson, 90, a WWII veteran who well remembers the Depression. “We can survive better than these city boys when something like this happens.”

City folks, said Oswale Yates, 86 and also a WWII veteran, “wouldn’t know which end of the hoe to get hold of. We live more simple. In other words, we don’t live as high on the hog as some people.”

Street2.jpg

(L) Robert Ferguson, 90 and Oswale Yates, 86, meet for the first time on the veterans' float. Both served in World War II and survived the Great Depression. Photo by Michael Williamson/The Washington Post

In the parade, Ferguson and Yates sat on seats of hay on a float pulled by a tractor. All around, the people of Union poked fun at their rural lives. Clowns in the parade dressed in exaggerated hillbilly costumes and a woman in the crowd wore a t-shirt that read: “Yes, I was born in a barn.”

Street5.jpg

Donald Reed, a local tobacco prevention coordinator, brought a display that warns young people about the dangers of using chewing tobacco. Caroline Dowdy, at right, stood in the shade during the passing parade. Photo by Michael Williamson/The Washington Post

Communities around here are still small enough that benefits are held when someone is sick and people don’t hesitate to help stranded drivers. Homemade baked goods were for sale all along the parade route, raising money for everything from church groups to Girl Scouts.

Street3.jpg

Lorien Tenney and sons Bowen, 6 and Aiden, 9, stand at attention during the playing of the National Anthem prior to the start of a wrestling match at the middle school in Union. Photo by Michael Williamson/The Washington Post

“It doesn’t cost a lot of money to have fun in life,” said Derric Bowers, 24.

When I approached him, he was sitting on a grassy patch, waiting to compete in horseshoe pitching with his grandfather, Richard Bowers, 71. Next to them sat a third man, James Mann, 50, who would compete separately.

“I seen on television where some of these cities are raising stuff on top of the building,” the older Bowers said, talking about green rooftops where some urban residents are growing vegetables. Bowers didn't see much use for that in his life: He can walk out to his garden to pick a fresh tomato if he wants.

The younger Bowers lost his job in January but was set to start a new one on Monday. Mann said he survives working three jobs – small engine repair, continuous strip mining and asphalt paving. Neither man complained.

“I’ll tell you the same thing I told my wife,” Mann said. “When you’re at the bottom of the barrel, ain’t but one way out of it and that’s back to the top.”

Street8.jpg

Military recruiters were out in force along the parade route, giving locals a chance to see a Hummer up close. Photo by Michael Williamson/The Washington Post

Street9.jpg

A popular event at the Farmers' Day Festival was the free hot dog cookout. Fixings included mustard, chili and slaw. Photo by Michael Williamson/The Washington Post

By Theresa Vargas  |  June 12, 2009; 9:02 AM ET
Categories:  Scene along the Street  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Selling A Lifetime Of Curios To Make Ends Meet
Next: Enough Coleslaw On Hot Dogs. On To Tennessee.

Comments

Cole Slaw on a Hot Dog? That's a new one to me. Thanks for posting about this small town life in West Virginia.

Posted by: ZebraLover | June 12, 2009 11:17 AM | Report abuse

I am struck by how many of these subjects are obese. Look at that plate of hot dogs and "fixings." Are we up to a 1000 calories for lunch yet?

If these people watched their diet better they would spend less on food, have fewer health problems, and be in better shape to seek and keep work.

Posted by: Bitter_Bill | June 12, 2009 11:18 AM | Report abuse

Was Jessica Lynch the parade queen????

Posted by: demtse | June 12, 2009 11:21 AM | Report abuse

In Union, A Choice Between Baby And Car:

Besides, you can't snuggle up with car on those cold WV nights...

Posted by: demtse | June 12, 2009 11:24 AM | Report abuse

Thanks for this. Looks like a good robust community there in Union. The weight ratio looked pretty good to me on those folk and I bet there's some strength in the community there to weather economic and other storms.

Thanks

Posted by: Industrialist | June 12, 2009 11:28 AM | Report abuse

I hate when people become screaming shrews on these things but here I go... Bitter_Bill: There is every chance that obesity is related to poverty and hunger as well as just an unwillingness to exercise. Check out University of Washington's Dr. Adam Drewnowski and his work on poverty and obesity. Seriously. And btw... slaw makes everything better.

Posted by: t8leonard | June 12, 2009 11:31 AM | Report abuse

I remember living in this general area many, many years ago. A small group of us tried to start a commune -- actually it was more of a farming collective -- we had hogs and chickens, we raised feed corn, sweet corn and tomatoes. We owned a 20-foot enclosed van truck, and bought vegetables from the Amish farmers in northern Ohio. Along with what we produced on our own, we sold vegetables in parking lots and on local college campuses' parking lots.

The people in the area weren't the least bit suspicious of a half dozen youngsters occupying an old farm house. It was the opposite. The local people were generous and friendly. For more than two months and longer folks would "just stop by" bearing large baskets loaded with canned vegetables and fruits and baked goods.

The conditions portrayed in this article and in the previous stories are an embarrassment to our county. The federal and state governments and the monopolies who control our government have gutted America and we are now a third world country.

These people don't deserve what is happening to them. If you can afford it, help them financially.

Posted by: Vunderlutz | June 12, 2009 11:32 AM | Report abuse

Take the car,in two years you will be on the nancy grace program defending yourself regarding the kid

Posted by: gonville1 | June 12, 2009 11:49 AM | Report abuse

A comment to all the liberal "compassionate" idiots that have nothing better to add but to point out a few obese people.....typical repsonse and not at all suprised.
Go to any mall in Balt/Wash/DC area and see how many white/black/latino fat people you see...same ratio.
If you dont have anything positive or constructive to add, shut up and sip your $4 McCoffee or what ever it is you waste your money on.....

Posted by: davemichelle07 | June 12, 2009 11:51 AM | Report abuse

I love stories like these. Just a portrayal of real life free of political slant. The way things should be.

Posted by: flem_snopes | June 12, 2009 11:58 AM | Report abuse

one more thing....
these people are the backbone, the heartbeat of America. They are the ones that made this country great.
It is the likes of the majority of the WP readership, the quasi compassionate tolerant liberals, not necessarily Democrats, but liberals that have aided and abetted the ruination of the US...
The US is on the wane....its too late. Our Govt and people have spent themselves into impending bankruptcy only to be taken over by foreign entities...it will happen.
God Help Us....(he tried and has for 200+ years but now...its too late..we have turned our backs)

Posted by: davemichelle07 | June 12, 2009 12:02 PM | Report abuse

For god's sake WP, we are supposed to hide that WVA stuff from the rest of the world!

Posted by: johng1 | June 12, 2009 12:05 PM | Report abuse

Hot dogs fixings are regional - in WV chili and slaw are the norm. In Chicago neon green relish, tomato, hot pepper. Mid West - saukerkraut and relish.

Bitter-bill I'm not sure what people you were seeing but out of 7 pictures there was one with two overweight people but the majority of those in the pictures were not overweight.

Posted by: rlj1 | June 12, 2009 12:07 PM | Report abuse

Bitter_Bill has obviously never had to struggle financially, or he would understand that obesity and poverty are linked. Try raising a family of four on $20K per year. You'll find your grocery shopping trends quickly focus more on high refined carbs, less lean meat, and few fresh vegetables & fruits unless you grow them yourself.

And also, while you are at it, try getting in a daily exercise routine while running a small engine repair shop, sitting driving strip mining equipment and sitting operating a paver.

When it comes down to it, as Hank Jr's song attests: Counrty Folk will survive. They can hunt, fish, grow their own food and survive on next to nothing.

Having grown up in "coal cracker" territory, the one thing I don't miss is the manner in which drugs over ran my hometown when the welfare office and drug treatment clinic moved to town.

Posted by: Disbelief | June 12, 2009 12:09 PM | Report abuse

I grew up near this town and graduated from Union High School in '76. I can tell you from living in many different places there is not a more compassionate community and peaceful place on this green earth. We could all learn some lessons of simplicity from Union, WV and all of Monroe county!

Posted by: halstead1 | June 12, 2009 12:10 PM | Report abuse

Travelin' through virginny and west virginny ... not the country ... wrong title for this blog.

Posted by: periculum | June 12, 2009 12:12 PM | Report abuse

Should be half-a-tank in Virginny.

Posted by: periculum | June 12, 2009 12:13 PM | Report abuse

"how many of these subjects are obese". Look at the pictures again. Yes a few prominently. But like another poster said, take a look around you. After reading the comment and looking at the photos again, I was actually struck by the number of "normal" weight people. Last thought: not only in WV but all over the country, small town ideals and mores were a major factor in what made this country great. Everyone should think long and hard about how we act toward neighbor and stranger alike.

Posted by: rah3 | June 12, 2009 12:14 PM | Report abuse

Folks, I kid you not, this economic reporting is the a new copendium to Alistar Cooke's historical reporting on "America". I hope they both seriously think about publishing on demand (green way) "Half a Tank (going on a quarter -- towards 'fumes')" later on. Perhaps PBS will now fund a video supplemental version for a similar documentary.

Posted by: lockmallup | June 12, 2009 12:14 PM | Report abuse

Hey, davemichelle07 - "librul, librul, librul..."

Shut up, pal. You sound about a hundred times more bitter than Bitter_Bill or anyone else here.

Maybe we should be glad you're just sounding off in the comments instead of gunning people down like so many discomfited reactionaries do, but...nah - shut up.

Posted by: achilli | June 12, 2009 12:14 PM | Report abuse

Of the bodies I could see (31, I didn't count the parade shot) 9 were obese or possibly overweight. Isn't 30% our national average? These folks are no different than the rest of us.

Posted by: AuntieEmo | June 12, 2009 12:20 PM | Report abuse

Union, W Virginia..."...friendly folks" ...really?

I guess if you "look a certain way," they are.

I took a wrong turn while driving through W. VA and decided to get a bite to eat. You would've sworn the devil himself walked in the door. Conversation (of about 15 people) died down QUICK. Asked for directions and this one old guy looked at me like I called him out of his name before he told me ...."Dat dare road iz juzt up yonder" with a look of being irritated.

Needless to say I didn't bother ordering anything. From there. They probably would've added some "special sauce" to it.

I knew something was funny when the kids were looking at me like a kid would look at an exibit in a museum.

I guess Union, WV isn't use to seeing black men with a BMW SUV.

Posted by: BigSmooov | June 12, 2009 12:21 PM | Report abuse

Thank you for the story about life in Union! My mom grew up there. This community really is special, and I think you described the people and their economic situation spot-on. There aren't many job opportunities in Monroe County, but people make do, often by the means you describe - reusing things, growing a bountiful garden, and being mindful of their priorities. My grandparents were absolutely like that. I'm not at all surprised that Monroe County folks are weathering the recession more easily than some others. My grandma was a master of saving, reusing, and thriftiness - and she and my granddad made a good life for themselves, their daughter, and deeply enriched mine, too.

To those who commented about obesity, I recommend Barbara Ehrenreich's book "Nickel and Dimed". She details the extreme difficulty of eating balanced and healthy meals on minimum wage. Limited access to health insurance and health care, which is not limited to rural areas like Union but which correlates with income levels regardless of where one lives, exacerbates the health issues that accompany poor diets.

Theresa and Michael, thank you again for visiting Union, and for introducing your readers to the wonderful, resilient people who live there.

Posted by: klewis1 | June 12, 2009 12:37 PM | Report abuse

It is bad enough to put ketchup on a hot dog--but cole slaw? No No No!
When I first saw the photo I thought it was cottage cheese--yuck.

Posted by: rabnpa | June 12, 2009 12:38 PM | Report abuse

BigSmoov - they probably had no idea it was a bmw (no matter how big your capital letters are). And judging from the fact that your username is "BigSmoov" I'm betting that the designer shades you were sporting, or the $200 jeans you rock with such "swagger" had something to do with their looks.

Simple people. Simple town. People with big egos (and expensive toys) like "Big Smoov" probably wouldn't fit in very well. That's just a fact - has nothing to do with them being nice or not.

Try living for one moment without your self-consumed, ego-centric, somebody's-always-looking-at-me "swagger" and be a normal human being for 5 minutes for crying out loud.

Posted by: -badkarma- | June 12, 2009 12:39 PM | Report abuse

Hey -badkarma-! How are you?

Anyway....

I was very respectable in my attitude and appearance. I'm not that kind of person that wear "$200 jeans.." and "...designer shades..."

I had on my grey suite and reading glasses while holding a map.

Nice to know how you view "certain people" based on THEIR NAMES though.

Peace!

Posted by: BigSmooov | June 12, 2009 12:46 PM | Report abuse

I love it when people who have no idea what they're talking about give knee-jerk reactions, especially when they try to stick up for things they have no idea about. I grew up in WV (which I love) and now live in rural Va (which I also love), and trust me, you urbanites and suburbanites have no idea how high the level of obesity is in rural areas.
Come on, WV is the second fattest state in the US! (http://calorielab.com/news/2008/07/02/fattest-states-2008/)
It is sickening. Sure, poverty is related in the sense that poor people everywhere tend to be uneducated and not know how to take care of themselves (Mexican-Americans are statistically the fattest demographic group on earth), but to give some sort of "it's-not-their-fault-it's-the-government's" response doesn't help anyone and is really very condescending to those of us who live in the country and are trying to climb out of poverty.
Don't get me wrong, I love WV, but to say that rural or small town people are somehow better or more American than their more urban counterparts not only doesn't make any logical sense, but it renders those terms meaningless and neglects to consider that something like 75% of our country lives in the suburbs. So by that logic, 75% of our country is somehow less American, less "heart and soul," than the rest? Garbage. Stop making excuses for people and problems you know nothing about.

Posted by: justin_timberwolf | June 12, 2009 12:50 PM | Report abuse

Im with BigSmoov! Been there, experienced the same thing. About thirty five years ago when I was working a summer job for the government, I asked my black co-workers to try out a restaurant called "Whities" (I kid you not) near Ft. Meyers. We sat down and they would not serve us. To hell with Virginia and its backwater residents!

Posted by: johng1 | June 12, 2009 12:52 PM | Report abuse

PS (to -badkarma-)

....I didn't have a $2000 paint job on my vehicle (see article). LoL

Posted by: BigSmooov | June 12, 2009 12:52 PM | Report abuse

Well I guess you're right then. Can you blame me though? With what you gave me to work with (the name and the car) how could I assume anything other than a monstrous ego (and the clothes to match).

So, for what it's worth, I am sorry. That being said, even the grey suit and reading glasses is obviously out of place for these guys. I don't think it had anything to do with them being unfriendly.

Posted by: -badkarma- | June 12, 2009 12:54 PM | Report abuse

As a West Virginian working and living in D.C. I must say that I am greatly offended by many of the comments posted here. It is very easy to comment on the life of "others." But there is nothing distinctly "otherly" about West Virginians than anyone else in this country. West Virginians are just as complex and individual as each other person in America. I was born and raised in West Virginia. I am a proud liberal. I enjoy life in the city just as much as I enjoy time in the mountains. I am educated and consider myself a Critical Race Theorist with regard to the way I approach the law and U.S. history. I have members of my family who are comfortably middle class, and others who are indigent. It is unacceptable for those of you making comments about West Virginia and its people to demote us to overly simplistic caricatures. For those of you who write these comments and are liberal: This is the exact reason that West Virginia is not a blue state -- your elitism and paternalism is offensive. I love that I can tell you the difference between a Red Oak and a White Oak, and that I can tell you the fastest way to get to Union Station from Capitol Hill. So, overall, West Virginians are complex and hard working people. For many of us, life is a struggle. But we're really proud. And I feel sorry for all of you who write about us as if you have just discovered some unevolved group of people. We could probably teach all of you something about life and living.

Posted by: WestVirginian1 | June 12, 2009 12:54 PM | Report abuse

And come on dude...BigSmoov? Don't even try to pretend like I'm drawing all of these unnecessary conclusions based on your name. It is what it is.

Posted by: -badkarma- | June 12, 2009 12:56 PM | Report abuse

There are high and mighty holier-than-thous on both sides of the aisle. On the right it's usually religious fundamentalism or hyperbolic patriotism. On the left it's the stereotypical "ivory tower" uppity-ness. As a liberal from a rural southern area, I hate them both. You idiots are no better than these folks just because you eat hummus and wear ironic t-shirts.
And as a North Carolinian, I can assure you that cole slaw on a hot dog is one of the best things there is.

Posted by: gtrain82 | June 12, 2009 1:00 PM | Report abuse

Wow, the quickest distance from Union Station to Capitol Hill...what a brain-buster. I'd agree with you that I hate paternal liberalism and that it's the reason that WV is now a solid red state, but let's not pretend that that's not a really really dumb reason to vote against your interests if you're a poor West Virginian. And let's not pretend that WV doesn't have serious problems just because we don't like the way non-rural Democrats (paternal elitism) and Republicans mindlessly hypocritical religion and patriotism, as gtrain82 points out) address them.


"It is unacceptable for those of you making comments about West Virginia and its people to demote us to overly simplistic caricatures. For those of you who write these comments and are liberal: This is the exact reason that West Virginia is not a blue state -- your elitism and paternalism is offensive. I love that I can tell you the difference between a Red Oak and a White Oak, and that I can tell you the fastest way to get to Union Station from Capitol Hill. So, overall, West Virginians are complex and hard working people. For many of us, life is a struggle. But we're really proud. And I feel sorry for all of you who write about us as if you have just discovered some unevolved group of people. We could probably teach all of you something about life and living.

Posted by: WestVirginian1 | June 12, 2009 12:54 PM | Report abuse"

Posted by: justin_timberwolf | June 12, 2009 1:10 PM | Report abuse

Kids on leashes, professional wresting in schools, and cole slaw on hot dogs????? Not to mention they voted overwhelmingly for the GOP last election. I'll pass on WVA the rest of my life.

Posted by: johng1 | June 12, 2009 1:12 PM | Report abuse

Don't forget they keep electing the KKK guy Byrd to the Senate!

Posted by: johng1 | June 12, 2009 1:16 PM | Report abuse

>>>"If these people watched their diet better they would spend less on food, have fewer health problems, and be in better shape to seek and keep work."


Why is it that everybody's so certain they know how the other guy's supposed to live?

Perhaps the true problem in this world is the people who make such arrogant snap judgments.

Posted by: 1EgoNemo | June 12, 2009 1:19 PM | Report abuse

I am from the DC area, so I consider myself a "city boy." I worked a year in the rural midwest after my residency as part of my loan repayment from medical school. It's a fact that the deep south (Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana) and Midwest/Appalachia have the fattest citizens. My experience there was that people were generally friendly. They were hard working. They lived simple lives without the pretense one might see on the coasts. However, I would never live or raise a family there. It's just my personal preference.

Posted by: jabreal00 | June 12, 2009 1:28 PM | Report abuse

I hate when people become screaming shrews on these things but here I go... Bitter_Bill: There is every chance that obesity is related to poverty and hunger as well as just an unwillingness to exercise.
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Actually, obesity and poverty are both caused by unwillingness to exert oneself. No surprise that the poorest Americans are the fattest Americans.

Caveat: "Poor" by American standards, even though by worldwide standards they would be amongst the wealthy elite.

Posted by: ZZim | June 12, 2009 1:44 PM | Report abuse

I am very proud to be a West Virginian. Although I'm not a native (born and bred in northern New England), I have lived here for almost four decades. Our problems (particularly the economic ones) are real and our people are far from perfect. But I don't think you'll find people who are (on average, of course) friendlier, more honest and hard-working (when there's work to be had), and generous (even when there's NO work to be had). And I'm happy to leave in a beautiful state with one of the lowest crime rates in the Union. So I'll prefer the company of West Virginians any day over the likes of johng1, Bitter_Bill, and their ilk.

I don't care which side of the political divide you come from: snarky, prejudiced, and ill-informed comments, particularly when offered as sweeping generalizations, reveal your OWN inadequacies. So you disdain cole slaw on hot dogs? How about just not PREFERRING it. Better yet, how about trying it? Your disdain reflects poorly on you, and we West Virginians really don't care.

Full disclosure: I am a centrist Democrat with an earned doctorate who voted for Obama and would do it again, so don't call me some toothless, ignorant, redneck wingnut just because I find your arrogance insulting.

Posted by: post_reader_in_wv | June 12, 2009 1:46 PM | Report abuse

johng1: please do pass on WV, since I'm 100% certain that everyone there would be okay with that. Anyone who considers Arlington (where Whitey's was, near Ft. "Meyers" (sic)) to be a "backwater" is probably going to throw a tantrum and claim racism any time Starbucks forgets the whipped cream on his tall mocha latte. Same as Mr. Paranoid Persecution Fantasy Big Smoov (they're out to get you, dude!).

Posted by: justin_timberwolf | June 12, 2009 2:23 PM | Report abuse

This is about a bigoted and ignorant as anything I have ever read:

"I took a wrong turn while driving through W. VA and decided to get a bite to eat. You would've sworn the devil himself walked in the door. Conversation (of about 15 people) died down QUICK. Asked for directions and this one old guy looked at me like I called him out of his name before he told me

...."Dat dare road iz juzt up yonder" with a look of being irritated.
"


You would howl with indignation if someone characterized the language and speech of black residents in any DC neighborhood in this crude manner. So what gives you the right?

Posted by: dotto | June 12, 2009 10:17 PM | Report abuse

“I am struck by how many of these subjects are obese. Look at that plate of hot dogs and "fixings." Are we up to a 1000 calories for lunch yet?
If these people watched their diet better they would spend less on food, have fewer health problems, and be in better shape to seek and keep work.
Posted by: Bitter_Bill “
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Walk down any street in most neighborhoods in America and open your eyes - you will see the same thing.

Try looking in the mirror before acting so SUPERIOR & SMUG!

There is a word for folks like you – bigot!

Posted by: dotto | June 12, 2009 10:21 PM | Report abuse

The people of Monroe County know how tyo farm, they know how to hunt. I would like to put some of you rich people out in the woods with nothing to eat alongside someone from Monroe County, WV. You rich people would go without food. You rich city people need to know, FOOD COMES FROM FARMS, WITHOUT FARMS NO FOOD mark from WV

Posted by: multilateral1234 | June 16, 2009 10:20 AM | Report abuse

"Donald Reed, a local tobacco prevention coordinator, brought a display that warns young people about the dangers of using chewing tobacco.."

Donald Reed weighs about 350 lbs.!!!! Not exactly the guy to give health advice. Reminds me of that South Park where Rob Reiner was the anti-smoking guy who needed butter to get out of his limo.

Posted by: billy8 | June 17, 2009 3:39 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company