Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
On Twitter: RedskinsInsider and PostSports  |  Facebook  |  E-mail alerts: Redskins and Sports  |  RSS

Chris Cooley practices, should play Sunday

Redskins tight end Chris Cooley participated fully in practice Thursday, clearing the way for him to play in Sunday's game at Chicago a week after he suffered a concussion against Indianapolis.

"He didn't have any signs of anything that was wrong, so ready to go," Coach Mike Shanahan said. "Unless there's something that happens tomorrow, but today, [I] talked to him after practice, he felt good. Hopefully, there's no setbacks there."

Cooley said he felt much better than he did in the day after the hit, which occurred in the second quarter of Sunday's 27-24 loss. He said he would not handle anything differently than he did against the Colts, when he remained in the game for nearly a quarter after taking the hit. He also said his progress since the injury hasn't surprised him.



"It was a pretty mild concussion," Cooley said. "I'm not surprised about it. I think this is what I was planning on."

Shanahan said inside linebacker Rocky McIntosh, who sat out last week with a concussion of his own, also went through a full workout Thursday and should be ready to return to the lineup against the Bears.

By Barry Svrluga  | October 21, 2010; 4:00 PM ET
Categories:  Chris Cooley  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Haynesworth could be a force against Bears
Next: Jim Haslett says coverage debates are routine

Comments

Posted by: 4thFloor | October 21, 2010 4:10 PM | Report abuse

Welcome back Chris and Rocky!!

Posted by: wireman65 | October 21, 2010 4:17 PM | Report abuse

Dude's a warrior. A strange one at times, but a baller none the less.

Posted by: Devo2 | October 21, 2010 4:17 PM | Report abuse

Yes, i mean d@mn i was gonna use FD if Gates cant go this week(not that gates misses games). fantasy off.

Posted by: Stu27 | October 21, 2010 4:20 PM | Report abuse

sit him out this game....no need to risk him getting another one....I'd rather they erred on the side of caution...

Posted by: BeantownGreg1 | October 21, 2010 4:21 PM | Report abuse

Why in the h*** would they let this dude play. he so scared of davis taken his spot. He need to think about the future. We all know davis has more talent than cooley and he knows it.

Posted by: skinsinsider | October 21, 2010 4:22 PM | Report abuse

Point-Counterpoint: Is Shanahan's Ego Hurting The Team

By Rich Tandler

Is Mike Shanahan’s ego hurting the Redskins?
A talented defensive lineman who knows the opposition well watches the Redskins lose from a suite at FedExField. A second-round pick from two years ago barely sees the field and then is summarily released.


And yet the team is 3-3 and in the thick of things in the NFC. Is the coach hurting the team with his odd moves, seemingly based on his desire to impose his will on the team? Or is he just exercising his authority, and getting what has been a very loose ship back into shape? We hash it out in today's edition of the wildly popular Point-Counterpoint.


Point—Let's start with what always seems to be Topic A of this subject, Albert Haynesworth. What was the point of sitting him against the Colts, a team he faced twice a year his first seven years in the league? It would seem that having a defensive linemen who is capable of dominating out on the field would have been a good asset to have against an offensive machine. Considering that the D-line didn't stop the run and barely got any pressure on Manning, it certainly couldn't have hurt to have Haynesworth available to see what he could do. Even if his conditioning wasn't at its peak--and players miss a week here and there all the time and don't have conditioning issues, so that's a dubious proposition--he certainly could have been in the mix for spot duty. The guy is a monster; he needs to play.

Counterpoint—Under normal circumstances your point about the conditioning might be valid. But did you see how fast Manning was getting the Colts lined up? At times it wasn't just no huddle, he barely paused between plays to call signals. Even some of the best-conditioned players on defense were gasping for air. But they couldn't tap out because the Colts were lining up so quickly that the Redskins couldn't substitute. Could you imagine Albert in less-than-peak condition being trapped on the field at a time like that? After a few plays he wouldn't have made it back to the right side of the line of scrimmage. You can't discount the missed practice day, either. That was a particularly complex game plan that Jim Haslett had in place. (Complex, yes. Effective, no.) Haynesworth would not have been up to speed on what was going on.

Posted by: Diesel44 | October 21, 2010 4:24 PM | Report abuse

(con't)

Point—Shanahan has handled this whole Haynesworth affair pretty well. When they changed defenses to one he didn't like, he gave him an out if he would forgo a huge bonus check. When Haynesworth decided to skip the preseason conditioning, the OTAs, and all of the minicamps, including the one that was mandatory, Shanahan mostly said that he would talk about the players who were there. When Haynesworth failed his conditioning test, Shanahan stuck to his guns. Albert had to try to earn his way back into the starting lineup. A player who was able to do as he pleased last year suddenly saw his preferential treatment end. It's called building a team, and Shanahan has done whatever he can do to get his problem child to conform to the team concept.

Counterpoint—To be sure, Haynesworth hasn't handled this whole thing flawlessly. His statement about wanting to be traded after missing the mandatory minicamp was particularly dumb. But if you read the not-so-fine print, the conditioning, OTAs, and two of the three minicamps were voluntary. That means players do not have to participate, and there is not supposed to be any retaliation for not attending. Apparently, Shanahan didn't get that memo. Haynesworth reported to camp at a weight lower than he carried last year with good strength; unfortunately, his trainer didn't do him any favors by not preparing him for the conditioning test. Shanahan allowed that to become a public spectacle for 10 days. Once he passed it, he was held out of practice for lame reasons. He was humiliated by having to play in late into preseason games with undrafted free agents. Before almost every game, rumors that he would be inactive made the rounds. And now, this, which makes it look like—yeah, I'll say it—Haynesworth is being punished because his brother died.

Posted by: Diesel44 | October 21, 2010 4:26 PM | Report abuse

Conclusion

Point—As much as Haynesworth's talent has been wasted, at least he'll be around the rest of the year. The Devin Thomas fiasco is just a case of tossing potential into the dumpster. Here is a player that nearly everyone liked when he came out of Michigan State, and the Redskins were considered fortunate to get him in the second round. Thomas didn't exactly shine his first two years here. But that's not an infrequent occurence with young wide receivers and, besides, almost nobody on offense thrived under Jim Zorn. Thomas was present for all of the voluntary offseason work. He was willing to play special teams. But Shanny wouldn’t let him on the field for most of the preseason games as he watched players like Shay Hodge get targeted. Once the season started, Thomas' role remained diminished, limited to kickoff returns, where, incidentally, he was one of the league leaders. Roydell Williams and the AARP-ready Joey Galloway, neither of whom is in the future of the franchise, caught passes while, again, Thomas might as well have been in the stands with the rest of the spectators. In an offense that was struggling to find a receiver to compliment Santana Moss, Devin never even got a chance to make his case on the field. Finally, almost mercifully, Shanahan cut him a couple of weeks ago. When asked why, we got a song and dance about Thomas not being a true professional. Thomas said all along that he was doing everything that the coach asked him to do. The truth was that Thomas did something to get into Shanny's doghouse and, as Albert has learned, that's like being at the Hotel California. You can check out any time you'd like, but you can never leave.

Counterpoint—The NFL is big-boy sports. You don’t get a chance to prove yourself on the field on game day unless you prove yourself on the practice field. Nobody has ever called Thomas any kind of a workout warrior. It seems apparent that while Shanahan was preaching the gospel to Devin, the player was reading a comic book hidden inside his hymnal. What is Shanahan supposed to do? Reward him with playing time? Between Haynesworth and Thomas, Shanahan has sent a message. It doesn’t matter how much money you make, it doesn’t matter if you were the team’s top draft pick. You have to dedicate yourself to your craft and to your team. If there is some short-term pain involved in getting that message across, Shanahan is willing to accept it. That’s not an out of control ego, that is smart management

Posted by: Diesel44 | October 21, 2010 4:27 PM | Report abuse

NFL Investigating Redskins' "Hit Stick"

Posted by Mike Florio on October 21, 2010 1:08 PM ET

Responding to a report by Jason Reid of the Washington Post regarding a tribal "hit stick" being used by the Redskins' special teams to reward big hits, Ray Anderson, the NFL’s executive vice president of football operations, stated, "The League has a no-tolerance policy toward any activity that encourages devastating hits. Obviously, any team reward or bounty for devastating hits is contrary to NFL policy. We will be looking into the matter with the Redskins and will be speaking to the players involved." When asked whether any fines or suspensions would be issued for "hit sticks" or other types of team reward, Anderson would provide no further comment.

NFL players who are found to violate the "devastating hit" policy will be subject to immediate fine and suspension without warning.

The devastating hit policy adoption comes after several instances last Sunday. Falcons’ Dunta Robinson propelled himself head first into Eagles DeSean Jackson. Both players are out with concussions now. Patriots safety Brandon Meriweather also went at Ravens tight end Todd Heap. Steelers James Harrison was fined for his hit of Mohamed Massaquoi. In all, the NFL doled out a total of $175,000.00 in fines for hits.

Anderson says no player should get a free pass for such flagrant hits.

Posted by: Kenbeatrizz | October 21, 2010 3:01 PM | Report abuse

Funny, this article appears nowhere that I can see on PFT.

Isn't it enough that we already have that mental midget from Boston posting fake PFT articles designed to look real?

Guys...comedy is a subtle thing. If you are going to try to be funny and post a fake article, fine! But they need to contain actual funny, over-the-top content designed to get a laugh.

Posting articles that look real about unfunny topics that are outright lies is a FAIL of epic proportions.

If you need further explanation please ask.

Posted by: WaitingGuilty | October 21, 2010 4:31 PM | Report abuse

thanks diesel....good stuff...might have been suggested up here a time or two, only too be shouted down....interesting...

Posted by: BeantownGreg1 | October 21, 2010 4:32 PM | Report abuse

Here's hoping this is just gamesmanship on everyone's part -- keeping the opponent off balance by making it appear Cooley will play -- and that they're not really going to play him the Sunday after that scary concussion.

Posted by: NateinthePDX | October 21, 2010 4:35 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: BeantownGreg1 | October 21, 2010 4:32 PM

You're right, Some like to take the opposite side of a discussion just to act like an ass.

I'm an ass.

Posted by: Diesel44 | October 21, 2010 4:36 PM | Report abuse

Nate...

Your post makes very little sense to me. The rules are clear and unwavering. A concussed player needs to pass separate Team/NFL/Independent tests that are compared to his baselines taken before the season. If he passes these tests he is OK to play.

Are you saying that from Portland you know that Cooley is NOT ok? You know better than the player, team and independent league physicians?

Come on man!

Posted by: WaitingGuilty | October 21, 2010 4:40 PM | Report abuse

I'm an ass.

Posted by: Diesel44 | October 21, 2010 4:36 PM


Then I'm an ass too cause I agree with your point of view. Right the ship Shanny, if you don't it will run aground, again.

Posted by: wireman65 | October 21, 2010 4:46 PM | Report abuse

Beep-Beep

Posted by: Diesel44 | October 21, 2010 4:49 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: Diesel44 | October 21, 2010

Good stuff.

Point wins a unanimous decision versus counterpoint.....

Posted by: dcwun | October 21, 2010 5:20 PM | Report abuse

"Redskins' DeAngelo Hall and Jim Haslett have heated disagreement over coverages--WAPO

If they're both gone nex tyear, I'll be happy.





Discussion Policy

By Jason Reid
Thursday, October 21, 2010; 1:35 AM
Cornerback DeAngelo Hall and defensive coordinator Jim Haslett got into a contentious exchange Tuesday over pass coverage instructions,

Posted by: TheCork | October 21, 2010 6:04 PM | Report abuse

Post a Comment

We encourage users to analyze, comment on and even challenge washingtonpost.com's articles, blogs, reviews and multimedia features.

User reviews and comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site. Additionally, entries that are unsigned or contain "signatures" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. Finally, we will take steps to block users who violate any of our posting standards, terms of use or privacy policies or any other policies governing this site. Please review the full rules governing commentaries and discussions.




characters remaining

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company