Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
On Twitter: RedskinsInsider and PostSports  |  Facebook  |  E-mail alerts: Redskins and Sports  |  RSS

Galea's lawyer: Injury treatment, not performance enhancement, was goal

It's worth noting that there are two sides to every story, and we've reached out to Santana Moss, his family, teammates, agent and Redskins officials to hear more about Moss's alleged involvement with Anthony Galea, the Canadian doctor charged this week with smuggling and distributing human growth hormone.

While we wait for them to return messages, it's worth noting something from the Buffalo News story this morning. Jason Reid explained that it's not only the game's oversized giants who might seek performance-enhancing drugs. Mark J. Mahoney is one of Galea's attorneys and he told the News that his client didn't administer anything to improve any athletes' performance; Galea was merely trying to help them heal from injuries. 

"Officials of the NFL and other sports organizations can sleep soundly tonight, because there is nothing he did with these athletes to help them with performance enhancement," Mahoney told the News. "[Galea] strictly provided treatment for injuries. If any athlete got [human growth hormone], it was injected directly into injured tissue, in very small amounts, for purposes of healing."

While some might be inclined to draw a direct connection to drug use and statistical improvement in a sport like baseball, that's a bit tougher to do in football. And then you begin to get into a morality questions. Rules are rules in the NFL, and any player who took HGH certainly broke them. But when processing today's news, fans will have to decide whether they judge a football player differently than baseball's cheats if his aim was to merely play a rough, demanding sport without pain rather than take illegal substances to gain an unfair edge over the competition.
 

By Rick Maese  |  May 20, 2010; 1:15 PM ET
Categories:  Santana Moss  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Reasons for using HGH are myriad for players in a grueling game
Next: Moss situation may complicate an already-uncertain receiver corps

Comments

TO talk.... puhleeze. We don't need the 8th grader. Bringing in TO would be like the paniced signing Taylor.

People are really gonna freak when the other shoe drops....

Sure is interesting that there are 4 viable RB candidates on the roster isn't it???

Is SM89 really one of the famous faces of the League as described (briefly before the tweet got pulled) by Jeremy Jarmon? Or is a famous face of the League more famous than SM89?

Posted by: SkinsfaninKaneohe | May 20, 2010 1:24 PM | Report abuse

From Sally Jenkins Article:

"Indirectly on trial along with Galea will be the properties of HGH, which Galea claims has healing and anti-aging benefits, though he denies giving it to active pro athletes. HGH is a tricky substance that gets at the heart of our confusion about "performance-enhancing drugs" -- and about what we expect from sport.

When we crack down on "performance-enhancers," are we trying to preserve the integrity of the competition or the health of the athlete? Is it safer and ethically more acceptable to use HGH to heal from an injury than to use it as a muscle-builder? If so, why isn't the difference reflected in doping regulations? Rather than work all of this out, we've allowed the anti-doping authorities to lump all substances and all athletes who sample them, regardless of their motives, into one equally guilty party. That way we don't have to do any hard thinking.

But the Galea case makes us think -- and it makes us confront a central truth that no one really likes to talk about: Some kinds of banned substances are extremely dangerous, and some are relatively harmless.

...............

In "The Physics of Football," physicist-author Timothy Gay estimates that the amount of force an NFL running back absorbs when a linebacker hits him is equivalent to being slammed by a small whale. Over the course of a game, offensive linemen expend the amount of energy it takes to push a small truck up a hill in San Francisco. Should we deny them a shot of calves blood extract if it can promote faster healing, lengthen their careers, and swathe them in lean muscle mass so as to spare them some degenerative joint damage in old age?

The most eloquent summarizer of our vagueness and self-contradiction on sports doping is Thomas H. Murray, president of the Hastings Center, a research institute dedicated to bioethics. Murray is a leading anti-doping advocate, but he zeroes in on the most troubling question in the Galea case: "If [the athletes] were seeking Galea's services not for performance enhancement but to help with healing and injury, how should we look at that? Purpose matters here, and so do effects."

Athletes are under enormous pressures to perform, whether from the public, their sizeable contracts, or a culture of pride, and they are more vulnerable than most of us to shysters peddling magical elixirs. I'm no apologist for athletes, but what I know from interviewing them for 25 years is that they aren't simple black-and-white characters, and neither are their motives. They are rewarded unfairly, but they are punished in equal measure by the cruelties of their professions. They start out believing in their own invincibility and slam into reality far more violently than the rest of us. Aging is harsher for them than for you or me. Their careers are over just when most of us are beginning ours, and they experience degrees of physical pain and repetitive injuries the rest of us will never know.
"

Posted by: 4thFloor | May 20, 2010 1:24 PM | Report abuse

Since when is playing a sport without pain and healing faster not an advantage? He took the PEDs to get an advantage to heal faster and play with less pain.

Posted by: sgm3 | May 20, 2010 1:25 PM | Report abuse

Wow, isn't this like the 10th post today? Beats the Hell out of just averaging 2 a day, good job guys!!!

Posted by: monk811 | May 20, 2010 1:25 PM | Report abuse

Wow...just Wow...

I never thought I would be on the same wave length as Sally Jenkins:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/05/19/AR2010051904705.html?hpid=topnews

Posted by: 4thFloor | May 20, 2010 1:25 PM | Report abuse

That was a good article, kind of makes you rethink the situation a little.

Posted by: monk811 | May 20, 2010 1:31 PM | Report abuse

Regardless, it is currently against the rules to use HGH. If a player believes HGH to be sufficiently different from steroids and other performance enhancers, the proper way to go about things is to start a movement among the NFLPA to have the rule changed.

The proper thing to do is NOT to just take HGH anyways and keep it on the down-low.

Posted by: Keiser | May 20, 2010 1:36 PM | Report abuse

change the rules if you don't like them, but to seek a foreign doctor out strongly suggests you knew what you were doing is wrong.

Posted by: 1965skinsfan | May 20, 2010 1:38 PM | Report abuse

I also thought Sally's article was a very good one.

We're very digital on PEDs -- they are bad. But what if they aren't bad? I've likened it to this -- what if Philip Morris found a way to make a tobacco cigarette that improved people's health?

The rules are what they are and Santana will get his suspension. I have no issue with that -- he knew the rules. And so did the doc involved.

But I do think that all PEDs are the same? No.

Would you take something that helped you with joint pain -- even if it increased your risk for cancer? Well, if the joint pain kept you from exercising, that'd increase the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, etc. Not clear cut.

What is good, bad and banned is going to get much more complicated in the years ahead.

Posted by: zcezcest1 | May 20, 2010 1:39 PM | Report abuse

Also sees in inbred faggit piece of dogsh*t trying to bait, while I'm dicking my "El Drano" into his moms mouth while his wife and grandmother tickles my balls, and his daughter and aunt lick my asscrack.

... Wasn't too overwhelmed by any of it.

Out to lunch**

Posted by: RedDMV | May 20, 2010 12:59 PM | Report abuse

Bait taken........

what a sucker

Posted by: rupertpupkin | May 20, 2010 1:10 PM |

Mebbe I should change my nom de screen to El Matador and DMV should change his to El Toro. It would be a natural move for him - he dumps more BS on this blog than a diarrhetic bull.

Posted by: ElDrano | May 20, 2010 1:39 PM | Report abuse

It is just like that stealing to feed the kids argument....

Posted by: Zeebs1 | May 20, 2010 1:40 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: zcezcest1 | May 20, 2010 1:39 PM

totally agreed.

Posted by: 4thFloor | May 20, 2010 1:41 PM | Report abuse

Exactly Keiser. If this is the road they want to go down, then studies must be done and policies/rules re-written. If treating an injury is going to be allowed, then that opens up a whole new window for cheating.

To me, the argument to allow more progressive/controversial injury treatment does hold water, but it would have to be done in a very open manner and with even stricter rules/punishments for those that cheat for blatant performance enhancement.

Perhaps the NFL could oversee or administer a treatment facility that allows these types of things to go on while more strictly monitoring those using PEDs outside of legit injury treatment.

Whatever happens, this is clearly going to be a huge topic this summer and during the CBA negotiations.

Posted by: WaitingGuilty | May 20, 2010 1:42 PM | Report abuse

Disappointing, but hardly surprising. There's something ethically lacking in most players coming from the "U."

Illegal is illegal, regardless of intent.

Posted by: Vic1 | May 20, 2010 1:42 PM | Report abuse

Tana, Cushy, Lights Out = pedsophiles

Posted by: ElDrano | May 20, 2010 1:45 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: RedDMV | May 20, 2010 12:59 PM

When they have your RI HoF induction, this one here has to go on the plaque. That's classic you.

Posted by: learnedhand1 | May 20, 2010 1:46 PM | Report abuse

Yes, as so many of you have repeated like a million times, I KNOW it is illegal, but that's not the point. The point is all of these 'drugs' are lumped and labeled together. Maybe it's something like this that puts in motion a separation of all these 'drugs' into better categories. I can see if a player takes it just to get healthy and stay on the field, but they are also taking it so that in 20 years they aren't confined to a wheel chair or a walker. We sit back and watch these guys get the piss knocked out of them for entertainment, but for them it's REAL and effects the rest of their life.

Posted by: monk811 | May 20, 2010 1:46 PM | Report abuse

"...fans will have to decide whether they judge a football player differently than baseball's cheats if his aim was to merely play a rough, demanding sport without pain rather than take illegal substances to gain an unfair edge over the competition."
..............

huh?

IF he took HGH (which he knows is against the rules) which we assume "the competition" is not taking, THEN he DID gain an unfair edge over others who played (or didn't play...) by the rules.

Posted by: walter-in-fallschurch | May 20, 2010 1:48 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: monk811 | May 20, 2010 1:46 PM

You mean like "medical" marijuana?

Posted by: learnedhand1 | May 20, 2010 1:48 PM | Report abuse

HGH is banned, Santana will serve his time and come back. Its the NFL version of a traffic violation where they pull your license for a while.

I also think the NFL is right to ban new substances and methods. With this caveat -- the NFL should ALSO determine, with the medical community, if these methods and substances are truly harmful. Essentially HGH should go through an 'approval process'. If it fails that process it stays banned. But if it turns out to be good for an athlete without major side effects, it should get approved.

Posted by: zcezcest1 | May 20, 2010 1:52 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: monk811 | May 20, 2010 1:46 PM

You mean like "medical" marijuana?

Posted by: learnedhand1 | May 20, 2010 1:48 PM | Report abuse

Two totally different things: as far as I know HGH doesn't give you the munchies!

Posted by: monk811 | May 20, 2010 1:53 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: zcezcest1 | May 20, 2010 1:55 PM | Report abuse

When I bought that bag of weed I just wanted to feel good, not commit any crimes......

Posted by: dlhaze1 | May 20, 2010 1:56 PM | Report abuse

Guess Tony Wyllie, the new PR guy, is going to earn his pay this week.

Posted by: zcezcest1 | May 20, 2010 1:58 PM | Report abuse

Will the information that federal agents obtained about any athlete’s dealings with Dr. Anthony Galea be shared with Major League Baseball, the National Football League or any other sports organization?

“I’m not going to comment on that right now,” Hochul said.

So, if they don't share the names with the NFL, does Moss still get suspended? I mean, is the 'source' (aka 'The Rat', probably a Cowpie fan) that gave up Santana's name a good source? Can the NFL punish Moss without the Feds giving up his name? Otherwise, how do you really know if he did it or not?

Posted by: monk811 | May 20, 2010 2:00 PM | Report abuse

Mahoney:
"Officials of the NFL and other sports organizations can sleep soundly tonight...."

lawyers are so full of it....

Posted by: walter-in-fallschurch | May 20, 2010 2:01 PM | Report abuse

One of the minor ironies in this is that the reporter who broke the story is in Buffalo. In Buffalo, the story is a minor one. But the internet creates the ability to, in effect, re-post the story very quickly, and interest in the story is big here.

So the Buffalo reporter creates lots of readers and eyeballs ... for someone else's website.

Posted by: zcezcest1 | May 20, 2010 2:05 PM | Report abuse

Shanny's smart response at this point:

"We are letting the proper authorities handle this investigation. If a time comes when the team needs to act, we will do so in coordination with the proper authorities and the NFL. In the mean time, our singular focus is to prepare for the upcoming football season."

Posted by: p1funk

That is a smart response ... but its not the smartest move. Part of preparing for the season is recognizing if one of your players might be absent.

Posted by: zcezcest1 | May 20, 2010 1:01 PM | Report abuse


The public response has nothing to do with actual decision-making behind the scenes.

Obviously, the smart thing to do is not merely recognize that Moss may be absent; but to start planning as if he will be.

Posted by: p1funk | May 20, 2010 2:07 PM | Report abuse

Otherwise, how do you really know if he did it or not?

Posted by: monk811 | May 20, 2010 2:00 PM |

When a copy of the court document containing Tana's name is shoved under his nose what choice does Goodell have?

Posted by: ElDrano | May 20, 2010 2:07 PM | Report abuse

Has there been a court date set yet??? Maybe this won't effect Santana this year, maybe we have him for the full year and he's suspended in 2011 where there's a lockout, and even if we play he's a year older and we can afford to get rid of him because we'll have FreeAgency and the draft to replace him. What's the chances of all of this happening, like monkeys flying out of my butt?

Posted by: monk811 | May 20, 2010 2:12 PM | Report abuse

"Injuries are part of the game."

We hear this a hundred times a season from players, coaches, GMs in all sports.

If injuries are part of the game, then taking banned substances to return from them is a competitive advantage that should be punished. It's not difficult.

Folks are free to have a metaphysical debate about the goodness of PEDs and an athlete's health, but when the rubber hits the road and you are dealing with rules that have been put in place that you agree to abide by, then what is "right" and what is "wrong" becomes very clear.

Posted by: p1funk | May 20, 2010 2:12 PM | Report abuse

marijuana not being legal is retarded, simply for the fact it provides a ton of value, not related to getting high...hemp itself is a great product for the environment, fuel source, oil, etc...there is more to the cannabis plant than just the buds. kills less than alcohol and cigs.

completely different topic than HGH, so i will stop and not get into politics.

He did it, he got caught...do your time, if you dont want to do your time, dont get caught

Posted by: mhartz1 | May 20, 2010 2:12 PM | Report abuse

So if a player takes it to heal faster, thus feeling less pain; that is a definite advantage.

If a boxer takes something that makes him less sensitive to punches and the pain they cause, is that an advantage? Yes.

it would be considered cheating.

Posted by: iH8dallas | May 20, 2010 2:13 PM | Report abuse

marijuana not being legal is retarded, simply for the fact it provides a ton of value, not related to getting high...hemp itself is a great product for the environment, fuel source, oil, etc...there is more to the cannabis plant than just the buds. kills less than alcohol and cigs.

completely different topic than HGH, so i will stop and not get into politics.

He did it, he got caught...do your time, if you dont want to do your time, dont get caught

Posted by: mhartz1 | May 20, 2010 2:12 PM | Report abuse

You and I would get along. I tried getting a NORML organization started at my college.

Posted by: iH8dallas | May 20, 2010 2:15 PM | Report abuse

if you dont want to do your time, dont get caught

Posted by: mhartz1 | May 20, 2010 2:12 PM | Report abuse

or.... dont do it in the first place????

Posted by: Zeebs1 | May 20, 2010 2:17 PM | Report abuse

steroid topic puts me to sleep, have a good day everyone

Posted by: mhartz1 | May 20, 2010 2:17 PM | Report abuse

beep

Posted by: Zeebs1 | May 20, 2010 2:18 PM | Report abuse

Rules are in place and he should be punished if found guilty, but they should still look into these hormones. All I'm saying is that if it's week 15 and our best player goes down and we had a chance to have him back in a couple weeks for the playoffs if he were allowed to take HGH's, then I'm all for it! I know injuries are apart of the game, but this way it would be legal and fair for all to take, not just a few that take them now and get an unfair advantage. Just re-analyze, that's all I'm sayin!
And by the way, there have been tons of rules changed for the better of the game: radio in offensive/defensive player's helmets, 2-point conversions, pass interference, replay good, replay bad, then replay good again with a few changes!

Posted by: monk811 | May 20, 2010 2:22 PM | Report abuse

Did Moss discuss w/ team doctors going to Galea for help?
Did Moss discuss w/ team doctors what he was injecting into his body?

If he thought he was doing nothing wrong, then Moss would have been very open about it w/ team officials.

He knew; he's gone for the first four games.
And now reality begins to set-in for we eager 'skins fans.

Posted by: RedskinRay1 | May 20, 2010 2:22 PM | Report abuse

I see how they are going to spin this: oh, it was just part of treatment and not anything to enhance their performance... Please. Even I am not that dumb. If it is just part of a treatment plan then why does a player have to get a Canadian doctor to fly down with the stuff to provide treatment? Why can't he just go to the team trainer and get fixed up? It was wrong, illegal and everyone involved knew it was wrong.

Posted by: RedSkinHead | May 20, 2010 2:22 PM | Report abuse

When I bought that bag of weed I just wanted to feel good, not commit any crimes......

Posted by: dlhaze1 | May 20, 2010 1:56 PM

But you are still a criminal....

Posted by: 4thFloor | May 20, 2010 2:28 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company