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Update


Dionne Warwick at a news conference to introduce the American Music Inaugural Ball on Jan. 8. Warwick, the event's co-chair, had been set to host. (Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)


Still no organizers taking credit for what happened to Dionne Warwick's canceled American Music Inaugural Ball, nor explaining how guests can get their money back. And now we're hearing from another group of aggrieved folks: the volunteers.

They're disturbed because they not only gave up several hours to train for a ball that never happened -- they also gave up their Social Security numbers and other personal data. Why? Because promoters said the ball might get "the visit" from President Obama, and they needed to clear everyone through security.

A preposterous claim, considering the new POTUS had 10 official balls of his own to attend. But, said a volunteer who asked not to be identified because of her government contracting job, "we got caught up in the excitement." Now she's worried about identity theft.

As we earlier reported, some ticket buyers have traced their bank charge to a Dallas firm with a disconnected number; the "Dionne and Friends" foundation that others sent checks to has not been incorporated for three years and has no record of nonprofit status with the IRS; and promoters are not responding to e-mails or phone calls.

Another volunteer shared with us an e-mail she got Tuesday from someone identifying herself as Warwick, thanking her and commiserating over the ball's cancellation. She ends by saying that the next time she needs volunteers, "I trust that I will be able to call upon you."


By The Reliable Source  |  January 29, 2009; 1:02 AM ET
 
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Comments

Woa-isn't this the person that fleeced a lot of people with the whole psychic network BS? This person lost my respect along with millions of other people with this scam, i REFUSE TO LISTEN TO ANY MUSIC FROM THIS SCAM ARTIST, she is the worst choice for any position like this-
BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by: sunaj | January 29, 2009 6:40 AM | Report abuse

Did the ticket holders use a credit card? If so, file a chargeback with their card issuer since they paid for goods that were never received. This is one of the few services from credit card companies that can actually help consumers. Trying to track down a phantom business in Texas is a waste of time.

Posted by: skipper7 | January 29, 2009 9:39 AM | Report abuse

I would encourage anyone who purchased by credit card to notify their company immediately. I purchased tickets via a credit card (and had even volunteered to work before the organizers' disorganization made me discontinue). Once the event was cancelled, I notified my credit card company and requested that they reverse the charges; when they asked me if I had tried to contact the "Dionne and Friends" foundation to work out a refund with them, I told them that the Washington Post was running an expose on the event, including that the promoters were unreachable and no one was claiming responsibility. The credit card company reversed the charges within 24 hours. I would encourage anyone who used a credit card to contact their company and forward these articles, if necessary.

I also received one of the emails sent to volunteers allegedly by Dionne Warwick, and it was unbelievable. I'm still stunned that no one has stepped forward to address how cash purchasers of tickets can get reimbursed. This has now moved into the criminal range...

Posted by: ACooke1 | January 29, 2009 2:46 PM | Report abuse

I would encourage anyone who purchased by credit card to notify their company immediately. I purchased tickets via a credit card (and had even volunteered to work before the organizers' disorganization made me discontinue). Once the event was cancelled, I notified my credit card company and requested that they reverse the charges; when they asked me if I had tried to contact the "Dionne and Friends" foundation to work out a refund with them, I told them that the Washington Post was running an expose on the event, including that the promoters were unreachable and no one was claiming responsibility. The credit card company reversed the charges within 24 hours. I would encourage anyone who used a credit card to contact their company and forward these articles, if necessary.

I also received one of the emails sent to volunteers (allegedly by Dionne Warwick), and it was unbelievable. I'm still stunned that no one has stepped forward to address how cash purchasers of tickets can get reimbursed. This now has moved into the criminal range...

Posted by: ACooke1 | January 29, 2009 2:48 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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