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Joe Vide, battling cancer, gets help from former D.C. United teammate Bryan Namoff and "Couture for a Cure."


Joe Vide celebrating after scoring against the Colorado Rapids in 2008. (Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP)

Bryan Namoff walked the runway at last year's party benefitting Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. (Vithaya Photographer for Couture for a Cure)

After three years in Major League Soccer, Joe Vide saw his release from D.C. United last year as an opportunity -- a chance to go back to college and lay the groundwork for a new career.

But in an unfortunate fluke of timing, just months after getting his politics degree from the University of Virginia and while exploring military service, the 26-year-old suddenly took ill in March while cooking dinner in his NoVa apartment. At the hospital, doctors found a lemon-size mass in front of his heart and smaller tumor near his pancreas. He had Hodgkin's lymphoma.

"It's definitely caught me, my family and loved ones off-guard," Vide told us from Raleigh, N.C., where he's living with his dad and undergoing chemotherapy. He's also battling with the health insurer he'd only signed up with weeks before his diagnosis, as the insurer says his cancer was a preexisting condition.


So did teammate Rodney Wallace and others. (Vithaya Photographer for Couture for a Cure)


In a more fortunate fluke of timing, though, Vide has become the beneficiary of a friend and former teammate's pre-existing interest in the disease. Last spring, United standout Bryan Namoff helped his wife, Nadine, put together a benefit for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society -- a glitzy fashion-themed party they called "Couture for a Cure," with various United stars dressed by local designers gamely walking the runway.

Namoff told us he had urged Nadine to make it an annual thing, with the plan of not just benefiting the society but also a cancer patient -- when they realized they knew one: Vide was his roommate during preseason training last year. Tuesday night's event at Woolly Mammoth Theatre, a glimpse at the new DKNY collection, will help underwrite Vide's medical expenses.

"It really puts a purpose to the event, when it's going directly to someone you know," said Nadine Namoff, whose father died of lymphoma. "You think, pro athletes, they take such great care of care of their bodies," but it can happen to anyone, "and it does."

"I'm very indebted to the Namoffs for thinking of me," said Vide, who will not be able to make it to D.C. for the event. "I'm only five or six days out of [chemo] treatment. It's tough enough getting out of bed."



Friends of Joe Vide

Couture for a Cure

By The Reliable Source  |  May 25, 2010; 1:03 AM ET
 
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Comments

I thought Joe Vide got the raw deal at DC United. He was a relatively good player, with experience that we got for cheap. Good luck to him and his recovery!

Posted by: alan19 | May 25, 2010 12:39 PM | Report abuse

Google GcMAF to see that Dr. Nobuto Yamamoto has conducted clinical trials which demonstrated that GcMAF, the potent macrophage activating factor has been completely successful (in Japan) at curing all of the dozens of his patients with prostate, breast, and colorectal cancer for good. Seven to ten or more years of follow up show no recurrence of the cancers.

However, GcMAF is completely natural and our bodies make it, so there are no patented drugs and hence no monopoly profits. Therefor, the FDA cannot approve it and doctors can't use it. Can we PLEASE find some way to use this proven cancer cure?

Both cancers and fetuses protect themselves from GcMAF by using Nagalase to prevent vitamin D binding protein, DBP, from being transformed into GcMAF. Otherwise we couldn't reproduce ourselves and cancers would be destroyed before they could harm us.

Posted by: CureCancerThisYear | May 30, 2010 11:35 AM | Report abuse

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