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"Decision Points": Other revelations from the new George W. Bush memoir

By The Reliable Source

Days before its Tuesday release, you've already heard the highlights of George W. Bush's memoir, "Decision Points": How he mulled dumping Dick Cheney from the '04 ticket, how he believes waterboarding Khalid Sheik Mohammed was the "damn right" thing to do, how Kanye West really hurt his feelings. Now we're going to give the book one last squeeze...


  • Was banned from the Princeton campus after a game where he led fellow Yalie undergrads to tear down the goalposts. ("All these years later I still haven't been back.") Yeah, he had been drinking.
  • Climbed onstage at a 1976 Willie Nelson concert in Odessa, Tex. ("I looked like a fool up there.") Yeah, he had been drinking.
  • After he gave up drinking at 40, got seriously into running. And chocolate. "My body was screaming for sugar."
  • He and Laura were close to adopting when they found out she was pregnant with twins.
  • The twins' reaction to his presidential bid: "Dad, you're going to lose. You're not as cool as you think you are," and "Why do you want to ruin our lives?"
  • Knew he was going to get along with Tony and Cherie Blair when, during their first meeting at Camp David, the Brits picked "Meet the Parents" as an after-dinner movie. ("There was no stuffiness.")
  • Totally pulled Josh Bolten's leg just before his first meeting with Bono: "Used to be married to Cher, didn't he?"
  • Vladimir Putin made a point of introducing his big black Labrador during a visit to Russia. "Bigger, stronger, and faster than Barney," Putin smirked. Later, Canadian PM Stephen Harper told Bush, "You're lucky he only showed you his dog."


Also:
Bush's "Decision Points" reviewed by Jonathan Yardley: "Competent, readable and flat."

Earlier: After two years out of the limelight, the ex-prez is suddenly giving a lot of interviews. Because he wants to defend his presidency? No, say pals -- only because he's contractually obligated to sell the book.

By The Reliable Source  | November 7, 2010; 12:15 PM ET
Categories:  Politics  
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Next: Quoted: Conan O'Brien on fortune, good and bad

Comments

If you remember when the news of torture first leaked out, Condaleeza Rice (and others in the Bush Administration)were on every talk show and media outlet swearing up and down that the United States does not torture. Looking back and after Bush's admission to the contrary, it is obvious that these folks are bald-faced liars. Who will hold them accountable?

Posted by: garysetzerscience | November 7, 2010 2:11 PM | Report abuse

I like Willie Nelson. I wish he would have kicked Bush off the stage and thrown a huge speaker on him. To finish hi off he should have thrown electrical equipment on him and doused him with water. I'm sure Willie feels the same way.

Posted by: johng1 | November 7, 2010 3:22 PM | Report abuse

Are we in Nazi Germany? Is it 1939? I don't understand. The previous US administration committed war crimes. Condi, Rummy, Colon, and Dubya are all war criminals. The current president ran on a promise of change. Why aren't there any war crimes trials? We have the evidence and now we have a confession. Why is there no accountability? The only conclusion: the US has been taken over by fascists.

Posted by: lorax2 | November 7, 2010 4:50 PM | Report abuse

All these pseudo human rights lovers talking about torture and the pseudo outrage they show is laudable. Their concern for any Iraqi was a political and journalistical calculation (which victim grope’s cause will get them a “progressive badge” at the next progressive camp, e.g.: Next Jon Stewart rally) and an anti Bush attitude and nothing else. Their vitriol and the ugly guttural reactions to do harm to Bush say all about their compassion. If they really cared about Iraqi people they would be supporting Bush (I didn’t think that the US should have invaded Iraq) to end to the violent ways of Saddam.

Also, if they are such lovers of human rights, they should ask themselves (if they do) about their use of Google. After all, we are told that Google had make deals with the Chinese gov’t (a major violator of human rights, according to western media/church of hollywood). I know, I know, things always have shades of gray when it comes to our own sins but its black/white when it comes to others’ sins. Very progressive, indeed.

Posted by: Lakbima | November 7, 2010 4:55 PM | Report abuse

Yeah and somehow they have managed to turn President Obama into the enemy just for cleaning up the messBush and Republicans made of this country. WOW!!!

Posted by: catmomtx | November 7, 2010 8:23 PM | Report abuse

In response to lorax 2 comment. I am not talking about the morality or lack thereof of the president being involved in torture. That is another issue. I am talking about the fact that through Bush's admission of torture we now have proof that Condoleeza Rice did lie not just once, but knowingly and repeatedly on television and other media to the American people. What does this say about the "values" that Bush ran his election on?

Posted by: garysetzerscience | November 8, 2010 9:27 AM | Report abuse

Over 1,800 people died in Louisiana because of Hurricane Katrina and we're supposed to care that Kanye West hurt poor ol' W's feelings...wtf is this country coming to???

Posted by: Bob22003 | November 8, 2010 9:34 AM | Report abuse

excuse me, I was responding to Lakbima comment not lorax 2

Posted by: garysetzerscience | November 8, 2010 10:02 AM | Report abuse

I know people are curious about what goes on in the minds of our leaders, but taking the opportunity to "come clean" after leaving office seems a little underhanded.

Plus, once s/he is out of office, really, how much does the public care? If you look at media coverage of past leaders, Americans seem to be a "who's in the hot seat now" population.

Posted by: cfow1 | November 8, 2010 10:22 AM | Report abuse

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