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Family Research Council explains: It lobbied for changes to Uganda resolution

Family Research Council spokesman J.P. Duffy has issued a statement on the "inaccurate internet reports" -- mine was here -- on the conservative group's stance on a resolution condemning an anti-gay bill in Uganda. FRC, said Duffy, does not support Uganda's bill -- although I don't know who said it did. Instead:

FRC's efforts, at the request of Congressional offices, were limited to seeking changes in the language of proposed drafts of the resolution, in order to make it more factually accurate regarding the content of the Uganda bill, and to remove sweeping and inaccurate assertions that homosexual conduct is internationally recognized as a fundamental human right.

As I noted, the Democrat-authored resolution made several blanket statements about the universal rights of sexual preference. The FRC lobbied to take those out, something completely in line with what its membership would expect.

The full statement:

Inaccurate internet reports have been circulating indicating that the Family Research Council lobbied "against" a congressional resolution condemning a bill proposed in Uganda. The Uganda bill would have provided for the death penalty for something called "aggravated homosexuality." Unfortunately, those spreading these false rumors deliberately failed to obtain the facts first.

FRC did not lobby against or oppose passage of the congressional resolution. FRC's efforts, at the request of Congressional offices, were limited to seeking changes in the language of proposed drafts of the resolution, in order to make it more factually accurate regarding the content of the Uganda bill, and to remove sweeping and inaccurate assertions that homosexual conduct is internationally recognized as a fundamental human right.

FRC does not support the Uganda bill, and does not support the death penalty for homosexuality -- nor any other penalty which would have the effect of inhibiting compassionate pastoral, psychological and medical care and treatment for those who experience same-sex attractions or who engage in homosexual conduct.

By David Weigel  |  June 4, 2010; 1:58 PM ET
Categories:  Gay  
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