Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
Posted at 7:45 AM ET, 12/15/2010

Morning Bits

By Jennifer Rubin

So much for the liberal spin that the individual mandate isn't critical to Obamacare. Eric Holder and Kathleen Sebelius make the conservatives' argument: "Without an individual responsibility provision, controlling costs and ending discrimination against people with preexisting conditions doesn't work." I think they need to get their stories straight.

So much for Mitt Romney's strategy. A reader of The Weekly Standard's Web site smartly observes, "Romney has now positioned himself so that if he is the nominee Obama can say that if Romney had his way everyone's taxes would be higher in 2012, and that Romney opposed the tax cut because it didn't do enough for millionaires and billionaires."

So much for class warfare. Roger Simon writes, "Congressional Democrats want us to hate the rich for being rich. To me, this flies in the face of the American dream, which is to work hard, play by the rules, save your money and marry wealthy... Congress is a virtually dysfunctional institution, torn asunder by hyperpartisanship and a demented degree of yearning on the part of incumbents to get reelected. So it is fashionable with some on Capitol Hill to hate the rich. Until election time, when they would like the rich to bundle money for them. Then the rich are just swell."

So much for brushing aside concerns about the individual mandate. Megan McArdle writes that "a year ago, proponents of the law were dismissing legal charges as crackpottery with no chance of succeeding. Now, while it doesn't look precisely likely that the law will be overturned in the courts, there does seem to be at least a small chance it will happen... If the law stands, what does that mean for American liberty? Or to put it another way: what do supporters of the law think the government can't force you to buy, and how do you reconcile the answer to that question with the rights the government is now asserting?"


So much for learning lessons. Charlie Cook says congressional Democrats are in denial: "It's safe to say they are working through some deep issues and haven't made the turn into the new politics of 2012. For the longest time, it seemed that it was the president who was detached from reality, but it is now apparent that the White House folks have read, studied, and contemplated the midterm election returns and exit polls, a process House Democrats have yet to do."

So much for Senator Joe LIeberman (I-Conn.) being the punching bag of the left. "The wooing of Lieberman is a remarkable turn of events for a senator who was so reviled by his liberal base that he lost the 2006 Senate primary over his hawkish stance on the Iraq war."

So much for Democrats' promises of fiscal discipline. "Republicans poring over a 1,924-page overarching spending bill proposed by Democrats to cover the rest of the fiscal year are threatening to grind the legislation to a halt, citing massive earmark spending, which, if passed, would be enacted into law without debate in the full Senate.Two sources who spoke to Fox News are describing the legislation as 'a total mess.'"

By Jennifer Rubin  | December 15, 2010; 7:45 AM ET
Categories:  Morning Bits  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Spending bill tests discipline of both parties
Next: Are you in favor of raising taxes?

Comments

Jennifer, Good Morning! It's a great day to be 10 days from Christmas, so I can find a parking space when I shop again.


"Megan McArdle writes that "a year ago, proponents of the law were dismissing legal charges as crackpottery with no chance of succeeding. Now, while it doesn't look precisely likely that the law will be overturned in the courts, there does seem to be at least a small chance it will happen..."

I'm against this whole Rube Goldberg contraption of HCR, however I love the facts more than anything else. Here's the story so far.

There have been 10 rulings at the District Court level so far. In 8 of them the plaintiff's case against health care reform was dismissed. In one the judge allowed it to go forward without ruling on the constitutionality. Finally in the only case where the plaiintiff paid $9,000 this year for work performed by a business partly owned by the judge, the judge ruled individual mandates unconstitutional.


You're a pretty fair attorney I'll bet, and I know you can count votes!

Posted by: 54465446 | December 15, 2010 9:37 AM | Report abuse

"So much for Democrats' promises of fiscal discipline. "Republicans poring over a 1,924-page overarching spending bill proposed by Democrats to cover the rest of the fiscal year are threatening to grind the legislation to a halt, citing massive earmark spending"

So does that include the $650,000 in the bill authorized by Senator McConnell for a genetic technology center at the University of Kentucky?

What may have been fueling Senator McConnell's righteous indignation was finding out that the bill was so big, he couldn't be immediately sure HIS earmarks were still in it!

Posted by: 54465446 | December 15, 2010 9:44 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2011 The Washington Post Company