Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
Posted at 8:30 AM ET, 12/12/2010

Morning Bits

By Jennifer Rubin

Bill Clinton reminds us why he was a more effective president than the current one. Whose idea was it to leave Clinton alone to do the Q&A? The current president, it seems .

President Obama reminds us he's second to none in egotism. Peter Wehner writes: "And just in case we forgot that Obama received the Nobel Peace Prize last year, he reminds us -- at the end of his three-paragraph statement -- 'I regret that Mr. Liu and his wife were denied the opportunity to attend the ceremony that Michelle and I attended last year.' This statement makes one wonder if there are any limits to Mr. Obama's narcissism." None.

Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.) reminds us that Republicans can often be their own worst enemies. "Rep. Pete King (N.Y.) -- a supporter of the [tax]compromise -- said that the deal is not perfect but shows that Obama is moving toward the middle after taking a 'shellacking' in the midterm elections. And I think for, you know, conservative commentators to be harping and taking cheap shots at the president, I think it's wrong." Well, shortsighted, at any rate.

Politico reminds us why liberals are so depressed. "At best, House Democrats' rage at the Obama tax bill is a principled last gasp on behalf of liberal ideals. At worst, they're whining, kicking and screaming their way to the margins as Obama turns them into the foil for his newfound centrism."

The Jerusalem Post reminds us how inept was the Obama Middle East policy. "And what did the freeze accomplish? The Arab world continued its adamant refusal to make even the slightest gesture. It took the Palestinians eight months into the freeze to agree to enter direct talks, which they walked away from three weeks later. And on Iran, the WikiLeaks disclosures showed the fallaciousness of the argument that an Israeli-Palestinian accord was critical in getting the moderate Arab world to join forces against Teheran." Hard to find anything the administration did right.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, throwing in the towel on direct talks between the parties, reminds us the Obama approach to the Middle East has "failed." Conducting talks without both sides in the room is a recipe for doing nothing, which at this point would be an improvement.

Aung Din reminds us there is a lot to be done in Burma. "Aung San Suu Kyi cannot work alone; she needs help from the international community. And the Burmese people are expecting the international community to listen to their voices and concerns. They need both moral and practical support to strengthen the democracy movement. It would be irrational and irresponsible for the international community to consider lifting the current sanctions and allowing foreign investments return to Burma.... [T]he United States should direct its energies to solidifying this grassroots civil society movement, which is Burma's best hope for lasting and effective political change in a country that for too long has been oppressed at the point of a gun."

John Yoo and Robert Delahunty remind us that the Obama administration's Guantanamo mythology has given way to reality. "This week the intelligence community reported to Congress that one-quarter of the detainees released from Guantanamo in the past eight years have returned to the fight. Though the U.S. and its allies have killed or recaptured some of these 150 terrorists, well over half remain at large. . . In the Gitmo myth, President George W. Bush was a Lone Ranger acting without Congressional permission, and Gitmo was a law-free zone. But the American people never opposed capturing and detaining the enemy. And now Democratic Congress has ratified Mr. Bush's policy."

Attorney General Eric Holder reminds us that no matter how politically correct the administration's rhetoric, when law enforcement officials catch Islamic terrorists, certain Muslim groups will scream "entrapment." Congress should conduct oversight hearings on why, despite credible tips, the FBI now stays out of mosques for fear of annoying the same groups that now are screaming about entrapment. Time, perhaps, just to do their jobs and ignore the squawkers.

A Chinese dissident reminds us how morally deficient is the U.N. "An exiled Chinese dissident representing Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo's family criticised Monday the UN rights chief for declining to attend a ceremony for the laureate, charging she was bowing to pressure from Beijing."

A new poll reminds us what happens when a president offends his base. "President Barack Obama's approval ratings have sunk to the lowest level of his presidency, so low that he'd lose the White House to Republican Mitt Romney if the election were held today, according to a new McClatchy-Marist poll. The biggest reason for Obama's fall: a sharp drop in approval among Democrats and liberals, apparently unhappy with his moves toward the center since he led the party to landslide losses in November's midterm elections. At the same time, he's gained nothing among independents."

By Jennifer Rubin  | December 12, 2010; 8:30 AM ET
Categories:  Morning Bits  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Friday question -- open thread
Next: Time to reset Iran policy

Comments

"'I regret that Mr. Liu and his wife were denied the opportunity to attend the ceremony that Michelle and I attended last year.' This statement makes one wonder if there are any limits to Mr. Obama's narcissism." None"

Sorry Jennifer, few columnists can ever criticze anybody on nacissism. The ego required to make a living criticizing from the sidelines the actions of those actually involved in the fight, makes newspaper columnists, on both sides, the leader in the clubhouse in this area!

Your myopia on Israel is stunning!

"And on Iran, the WikiLeaks disclosures showed the fallaciousness of the argument that an Israeli-Palestinian accord was critical in getting the moderate Arab world to join forces against Teheran." Hard to find anything the administration did right.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, throwing in the towel on direct talks between the parties, reminds us the Obama approach to the Middle East has "failed." Conducting talks without both sides in the room is a recipe for doing nothing, which at this point would be an improvement"

It was the BUSH ADMINISTRATION that other Arab leaders first tried to move on Iran, and who built up the hegemony of Iran in the first place. Blaming the Obama administration for failed peace in the Middle East is like yelling at the coroner for using blue instead of black ink on the death certificate.


On Gitmo, exactly what does anyone expect Obama to do? Bush should never have opened the facility in the first place, and John Yoo and his misguided legal opinions was the CAUSE of the problem, so his crticism is especially ironic.

The prisoners can't be brought to this country, and and they can't be released. This is SOLELY AND COMPLETELY the fault of the Bush administration for opening a prison that it never had any plan whatsoever for closing! It is particularly bizarre of him to state that the American people never opposed the prison, since no actions concerning the facility were ever open for public debate.

I'm also unable to determine how the Congress has ratified Bush's actions since what they REALLY opposed was the idea of bringing the prisoners to the US for either trial or incarceration. Executing most of the prisoners was obviously the best option, but the Bush administration lacked the courage of their convictions to do that, sloughing off an intractable problem on to their successors.

So John Yoo, despicable bastard that he is, crows in a newspaper column that the toxin he purposefully injected into the American bloodstream has no antidote and you quote him as being proven right?

Jennifer this is easily the worst column you have written so far


Posted by: 54465446 | December 12, 2010 9:28 AM | Report abuse

Let me turn your question around 544 - what did you expect the Bush Administration to do with captured enemy combatants? What was your plan to deal with these creatures?

We know for a fact that putting these animals back in circulation results in some of them going back to the fight. The Bush Administration did this as well as Obama's.

Look - Obama promised he would close the place without really understanding what he was getting himself into. That was his error. Your constant defense of Obama is getting tiresome.

And I had plenty of grief for the Bush administration in many areas. But Gitmo was the best of the many bad options. And still is.

Posted by: jmpickett | December 12, 2010 11:07 AM | Report abuse

Oh, if Bush had executed the prisoners, you and your lefty pals would have been fine with that? The NYT would have been cool with it? ARE YOU FREAKING KIDDING ME?

Posted by: jmpickett | December 12, 2010 11:08 AM | Report abuse

Jmpickett:

So instead, you're championing the Bush administration for creating an intractable problem, and then castigating the Obama administration for not solving it.

As for executing them I am only taking the legal advice of the same John Yoo, then at Justice, who professionally opined that these men were neither POW's, nor criminals within the meaning of the Constitution, and as a result had no rights which the government was bound to respect.

I didn't notice that the Bush administration was particularly concerned about anything else that was said about it or protests against it. Why worry about the fate of the prisoners, most of whom it correctly accused of murder or conspiracy to do so?

As in Iran, so with Gitmo, the Bush administration lacked the courage of it's convictions to carry thtough their policies to their logiacl ends.

BTW, do YOU have a substitute plan for what to do, or is it simply run Gitmo forever and forget that it exists?

Thanks for the chat though, enjoyable as always.

Posted by: 54465446 | December 12, 2010 12:01 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2011 The Washington Post Company