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Posted at 1:20 PM ET, 01/ 4/2011

500 Americans ask for clemency for Jonathan Pollard

By Jennifer Rubin

A letter signed by 500 rabbis and other prominent Jewish and non-Jewish religious leaders has been sent to the president urging release of Jonathan Pollard. The letter reads as follows:

We, the undersigned over five hundred religious and communal leaders representative of the broad spectrum of the American faith community - wish to add our voices in support of clemency for Jonathan Pollard. We are united in the fundamental belief that "Justice, only justice, shall you pursue" (Deuteronomy 16:20), which rests at the core of our moral principles and system of justice.

Mr. Pollard is currently serving his 26th year of a life sentence, having been indicted on one count of passing classified information to an ally without intent to harm the United States. We certainly do not condone his crime, nor do we underestimate the gravity of the offense. But it is patently clear that the sentence was and remains terribly disproportionate - the average punishment is a 2-4 year prison term - and (as several federal judges have noted) constitutes a gross miscarriage of justice.

As you know, prominent figures from across the spectrum have publicly stated their support for Mr. Pollard's release. They include Nobel Laureate Elie Wiesel, Senators Charles Schumer and Arlen Specter, Harvard Law Professors Charles Ogletree and Alan Dershowitz, former Attorney General Michael Mukasey, former Assistant Secretary of Defense Lawrence Korb, Rev. Theodore Hesburgh of Notre Dame, Benjamin Hooks of the NAACP, former federal Judge George Leighton, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, former U.S. Solicitor General Theodore Olsen, Pastor John Hagee, and Gary Bauer. Furthermore, thirty-nine members of Congress have recently submitted to you a "Dear Colleague" letter led by Congressman Barney Frank in support of commuting Mr. Pollard's sentence. Perhaps most noteworthy, similar support has come from those who have seen the classified information of the actual damage caused including former CIA Director R. James Woolsey, Congressman Anthony Weiner, and former Senator and Chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee Dennis DeConcini.

After more than two and a half decades in prison, Mr. Pollard's health is declining. He has repeatedly expressed remorse for his actions, and by all accounts has served as a model inmate. Commuting his sentence to time served would be a wholly appropriate exercise of your power of clemency - as well as a matter of basic fairness and American justice. It would also represent a clear sense of compassion and reconciliation - a sign of hope much needed in today's world of tension and turmoil.

Thank you for your consideration of this request.

The letter was put together by Orthodox activist Daivd Nye,r whom I spoke to by phone this morning. He explained that he "started about a year ago. I read about him and talked to people who were close to the Pollards. There had been a lot of talk for many years, but I decided to do something about it." He was instrumental in organizing a letter signed by 39 members of Congress urging a pardon. He says, "I work as a inidvidual, not for any organization but I work in collaboration with organizations so I can bring left and right together for a good cause." He adds, "It is refreshing to see the extreme Orthodox and the Reform leftwing" come together.

A press release accompanying the letter states, in part:

The signatories on the letter include prominent religious and communal leaders from a wide array of Christian and Jewish communities, including representatives of Alliance for Jewish Renewal, American Values, Amit, Association of Reform Zionists of America, B'nai B'rith International, Central Conference of American Rabbis, Christians United for Israel, Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations, EMUNAH of America, Florida Council of Churches, Hebrew Union College, Hillel, JCC's of North America, Jewish Women International, National Council of Young Israel, New York Board of Rabbis, ORT America, Inc., Orthodox Union, Rabbinical Council of America, Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, Religious Zionists of America-Mizrachi, Simon Wiesenthal Center, Union for Reform Judaism, Yeshiva University, and the Zionist Organization of America.

Nyer is correct that the letter is noteworthy, in part, because of the diverse political affiliation of the signatories, ranging from conservative Morton Klein of the ZOA to such leftwing figures as Rabbi Eric H. Yoffie, head of the Union of Reform Judaism. In the past, the intensity for Pollard's pardon has been primarily on the right, but this broad-based plea suggests this is no longer a rightwing issue. As the press release notes, some well known liberal individuals and groups have adopted the cause:

"I have written president Obama seeking a pardon for Jonathan Pollard," said Professor Charles J. Ogletree, the Jesse Climenko Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, and the Director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice. "I hope the President grants the wishes of many who have supported a pardon for Mr. Pollard." Professor Ogletree, who was President Barack and First Lady Michelle Obama's law professor at Harvard and remains friends with them today, recently sent his own letter to the President concerning Jonathan Pollard. . . .

"It appears that Mr. Pollard is in prison not because of the crime he committed but due to geopolitics," said Carlos M. Salinas, former Acting Director of Government Relations for Amnesty International USA. "No human being should ever be a chit in such a game."

Will this broad-based appeal make a difference? On one hand, few votes will change based on a decision to pardon Pollard, so one could argue there is no "upside" for Obama to pardon Pollard. Nevertheless, Obama now has all the cover he could need (including the support of former national security officials, should he decide to make a gesture both to the American pro-Israel community and the Israeli people, who remain suspicious if not downright hostile toward the American president. Expectations are low that Obama will grant the pardon; but perhaps, as with other moves since the midterm elections, the president will confound his critics.

By Jennifer Rubin  | January 4, 2011; 1:20 PM ET
Categories:  American Jews, Israel  
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Comments

The incarceration of Jonathan Pollard, in direct and deliberate violation of his plea bargain, is perhaps the greatest injustice perpetrated by the American government in the past 80 years.
Even worse is the fact that Jonathan, who spied for a friendly country, Israel, has been punished far more cruelly than individuals who have spied for Russia, China, or any other enemy state.
If Obama wishes to regain any of his lost credibility with the American Jewish Community and especially the Israeli Jewish Community, he will pardon Jonathan and have him released from prison immediately.

Posted by: kenhe | January 4, 2011 1:43 PM | Report abuse

Hmmm all those former government officials that didn't want to endanger their own hides by taking this action when they were in office, throw the ball in Obama's court. There's nothing cowardly about that is there?

I'm SURE that nobody on the right would criticize Obama for such a move now would they?

Mukasey as former Attorney General is such an AMAZING hypocrite in this, he could be Bill Kristol with a more distinguished resume.

Still in fairness, I'm ready to make a deal. Pollard to Israel in return for the two Sheinbeins, and you don't even have to throw in any draft picks!

Posted by: 54465446 | January 4, 2011 1:46 PM | Report abuse

...and absolutely no one else cares.

Posted by: danw1 | January 4, 2011 1:57 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, throw another bone to the 'Israel Can Do No Wrong' crowd. The notion that Obama is hostile to Israel and that he should have to pander to them even more than he already has, is just ridiculous. Pollard would be released to a hero's welcome...in Israel of course, which would be rather embarrassing for the US, not that people like Rubin care. Nothing like a bit of treason to get the Israel lobby to suddenly stop caring about national security and being tough on crime! All that matters is What Israel Wants, Israel Gets.

And what did Israel do with the info. Pollard gave to them? Didn't some of it end up in the hands of the Russians?

I'm so sure if this were a spy for any ally OTHER than Israel, Rubin would be all for his release. Not. She's a one-trick pony.

Posted by: Stacyx | January 4, 2011 2:11 PM | Report abuse

Nope, sorry. Pollard took an oath, violated the oath. I don't care if it was for our buddies Israel. That's like spying for our Chinese buddies.
Information freely shared with allies is one thing...but then again, the Izzies have kept secrets from us, too.
Pollard stays.

Posted by: daskinner | January 4, 2011 2:18 PM | Report abuse

Nope, sorry. Pollard took an oath, violated the oath. I don't care if it was for our buddies Israel. That's like spying for our Chinese buddies.
Information freely shared with allies is one thing...but then again, the Izzies have kept secrets from us, too.
Pollard stays.

Posted by: daskinner | January 4, 2011 2:20 PM | Report abuse

Pollard betrayed his country, and was tried and convicted.

He will serve his sentence.

Case closed.

Posted by: slowroller | January 4, 2011 2:42 PM | Report abuse

I too will support the continued incarceration of Pollard. I don't care if other spies for other countries were treated with more leniency (putting aside behind the scenes political realities, there should be no leniency for any treasonous act in my opinion). The fact that Pollard spied for an ally carries no water with me.

Posted by: RitchieEmmons | January 4, 2011 3:06 PM | Report abuse

1) Greg Sargent is a complete idiot

I read the liberals to hear their point of view.

But this guy writes garbage, and half the time it is almost as if he is throwing a hissy fit.


2) Jennifer I highly recommend that you lighten up on the Jewish topics and frequency.


If we are going to fight the liberals, we have to concentrate on that.


3) Pollard was in the US military and he betrayed this nation.


"Intent to harm the US" - usually our government never tells us how serious these cases are, in order to avoid tipping off the other side.

Therefore, the logical conclusion is that this case is far more serious than has been made public. We, without classified information, are in no position to make any evaluation on how much damage has been done.

Usually, the government does NOT want to bring up the most sensitive parts of a case in Court. They make public the minimum necessary. So, we never know, except you can be sure the truth is far worse than you think.


Thank you for your consideration.

.

Posted by: RainForestRising | January 4, 2011 3:22 PM | Report abuse

Pollard should NEVER be released and the 500 dual-loyalists should be stripped of their citizenship and expelled from the country.

Posted by: dogsbestfriend | January 4, 2011 3:29 PM | Report abuse

If this is such a no-brainer then why didn't Bush or Clinton pardon him? Why is the defense establishment uniformly opposed to his being pardoned? It would be nice if you from time to time presented more than one side of an issue so your viewers could better assess the relative merits. Also, as I recall, he was paid by Israel to spy and didn't he make similar offers to other countries to sell them classified information?

Posted by: wswest | January 4, 2011 3:34 PM | Report abuse

It's true that it's hard to tell without knowing all the information, but it seems reasonable enough to say that unless you've given information on directly relevant military matters to an enemy likely to make use of it a life sentence is a bit harsh. It's hard to see why there should be so much hostility to the suggestion that 25 years is enough.

Posted by: adam62 | January 4, 2011 3:42 PM | Report abuse

adam62:

Since you and I enjoy the go-round a bit, would you be willing to trade the Sheinbeins for him?

Posted by: 54465446 | January 4, 2011 4:40 PM | Report abuse

I'm afraid I'm not sure who the Sheinbeins are--if it's that murderer that Israel was resisting extraditing (why the plural, then?), then I never understood why Israel didn't find a way to rid themselves of him in the first place.

Posted by: adam62 | January 4, 2011 5:03 PM | Report abuse

When 500 hundred individuals with dual American and Israeli citizenship tell me it's okay for another individual with the same dual citizenship to spy on the the U.S. and share top secrect and classified military secrets, I have to ask them what they've been smoking?

Pick a side.

Posted by: goyo1588 | January 4, 2011 5:14 PM | Report abuse

When 500 hundred individuals with dual American and Israeli citizenship tell me it's okay for another individual with the same dual citizenship to spy on the the U.S. and share top secrect and classified military secrets, I have to ask them what they've been smoking?

Pick a side.

Posted by: goyo1588 | January 4, 2011 5:17 PM | Report abuse

These are the people who want Pollard released? My gosh, Israel could bomb Switzerland and these folks would be on the news that evening fervently apologizing for the poor little victim who is always being threatened by chocolate and bird-clock ruffians.

Posted by: goyo1588 | January 4, 2011 5:23 PM | Report abuse

These are the people who want Pollard released? My gosh, Israel could bomb Switzerland and these folks would be on the news that evening fervently apologizing for the poor little victim who is always being threatened by chocolate and bird-clock ruffians.

Posted by: goyo1588 | January 4, 2011 5:24 PM | Report abuse

Let Polllard rot.

Posted by: AnotherVoter | January 4, 2011 5:48 PM | Report abuse

"The incarceration of Jonathan Pollard, in direct and deliberate violation of his plea bargain, is perhaps the greatest injustice perpetrated by the American government in the past 80 years."

Not only is that some truly outrageous hyperbole, it's also irrelevant. The judge was not bound by the plea bargain, and moreover, Pollard and his wife repeatedly violated nondisclosure agreements during the trial. And on top of that, they showed absolutely no remorse for the enormous damage they inflicted.

No patriotic American could possibly desire clemency for Pollard, and I question the loyalty of any American who does.

Posted by: voxempiricus | January 4, 2011 5:59 PM | Report abuse

I have no position on the Pollard pardon because I have not enough information to assess the relative merits and I do not have time to educate myself on this issue. He is a spy (albeit for a friendly nation, which does matter), but there are some very troubling aspects to the case that argue for a commutation and others that argue for continued incarceration.

What I love about this issue is how it drives the anti-Semites crazy. They can't dress their Jew hatred up enough to hide it. I particularly love the old "dual loyalty" charge, as if there are not real issues of justice involved. For the entertainment value alone, it is worth posting.

Posted by: gord2 | January 4, 2011 6:04 PM | Report abuse

gord2: So, basically, you don't understand the case, but you'll nonetheless blindly accuse those who oppose Pollard's release of anti-Semitism.

I see.

Posted by: voxempiricus | January 4, 2011 6:10 PM | Report abuse

Gord 2,
You clearly don't understand. One takes an oath and does not split one's loyalties when in the military. It is not only supremely bad form, it is dangerous.
I also take grave exception to you "antisemite" slant on this. What about those who are saying it was really okay to spy for Israel because it's Israel? Or okay to spy for the Jewish state because one is, a Jew above all?
Would be forgive a Muslim American for spying for some mullahs because he's a Muslim?
Pollard stays.

Posted by: daskinner | January 4, 2011 6:13 PM | Report abuse

RFR: Why should Ms. Rubin "lighten up on the Jewish topics and frequency. If we are going to fight the liberals, we have to concentrate on that."

There is nothing liberal about alleged liberals who are openly pro-Palestinian and accuse anyone who supports Israel, especially when there is a center-right governing coalition, of 'dual-loyalty' and worse.

Besides, Rubin is at her best when it comes to the hypocrisy of the left on anything about Israel.

Obama has, intentionally or not, given Jew-haters throughout the world cover to openly express their Jew-hatred with his failed policies of "tough love" to Israel by pandering to his leftist base with his irrational obsession over apartments in North (Ramat Shlomo) and South (Har Homa)Jerusalem. How do you think the Democratic Party lost my formerly reliable vote? Israel was never even a top 5 issue for me bfore exposure to the Jew-haters of the anti-war left who sound like they studied history with textbooks from Saudi Arabia.

as to Pollard's pardon? Covered much better in the comment threads at The New Republic's Spine.

Those who call for his continued detention are probably cheering Julian Assange as a hero...hypocrites all.

Posted by: K2K2 | January 4, 2011 6:27 PM | Report abuse

Adam62:

Sol Sheinbein was a well connected attorney with dual Israeli citizenship. After his son dismembered his friend in a "thrill killing" Sol got him out of the country, even though he knew the son was wanted. Then he fled to Israel after the son when a warrant was issued for his arrest. Israel denied extradition, even though the son had never been to Israel in his life before.

The son was sentenced by an Israeli court, and will be released on parole two years from now.

Posted by: 54465446 | January 4, 2011 6:29 PM | Report abuse

voxempiricus:

I never said I don't understand what the issue is. I said I don't know enough about the facts to opine on it one way or the other. That doesn't mean I don't know any of the facts; just that I dont' know all of the salient ones. Nor did I "blindly" accuse anyone of anything. I read the comments to Jennifer Rubin's post and reached a well-grounded conclusion about some (not all) of the posters based on what they wrote. Do you see now?

daskinner:

I understand quite nicely, thank you. I never claimed it is "okay" to spy against our country. Nor do I believe any of the 500 mentioned in Jennifer Rubin's post think spying is acceptable. Nor do do they (or I) think Pollard should not have been punished. As you know, he was punished severely. The issue is whether justice has been served and involves many issues including, among others, whether promises were made and not kept. You are arguing against positions I never took.

You assume the 500 or, for that matter, those who question what was done to Pollard have dual loyalties. Does that include those in the 500 who are obviously not Jewish? The dual loyalty charge has been a staple of anti-Semites for hundreds of years. And there are those who still traffic in it, as we see in the comments.

Posted by: gord2 | January 4, 2011 7:09 PM | Report abuse

I see. Well, I'm not sure what law the elder Sheinbein broke, but I'd like to see his psychopathic son in jail (in an American jail) for the rest of his life; for that matter, I'd like to see the rest of his life shortened. I remember this very vaguely, but as you suggest, it appears they were very good at exploiting Israeli law, and the Israeli officials couldn't find a way to rid themselves of him. If they could find a way, I hope they will.

Posted by: adam62 | January 4, 2011 7:26 PM | Report abuse

gord2: That is a rather slippery and convenient restatement of your original argument. And of course you are accusing blindly - you don't understand the issue, yet you are willing to ascribe motives to those who do. Do I see now? Yes, indeed, I have seen all along.

Posted by: voxempiricus | January 4, 2011 8:06 PM | Report abuse

voxempiricus:

It is not slippery but explanatory. Nor is it a restatement of what I said initially. But since you were one of the posters I was accusing, I can understand why you are so prickly.

Posted by: gord2 | January 4, 2011 8:16 PM | Report abuse

It's not that Pollard has served long enough or too long, it's that the others didn't serve long enough.

Posted by: Otiose1 | January 4, 2011 8:20 PM | Report abuse

"Sol got him out of the country, even though he knew the son was wanted. "

I overlooked this--so that would be his criminal offense. I assume he is also in Israel. I don't know if there's any possible connection to Pollard here, but the US government should stay on the case and keep the extradition requests active.

Posted by: adam62 | January 4, 2011 9:04 PM | Report abuse

>> Even worse is the fact that Jonathan, who spied for a friendly country, Israel, has been punished far more cruelly than individuals who have spied for Russia, China, or any other enemy state.

If Israel is such a friendly country, what are they doing spying on their friend and selling such sensitive secrets to the US's biggest enemy at the time?

>> If Obama wishes to regain any of his lost credibility with the American Jewish Community and especially the Israeli Jewish Community, he will pardon Jonathan and have him released from prison immediately.

He might gain credibility with the American Jewish Community and the Israeli Jewish Community, but he will lose all credibility with those he has taken an oath to protect.

Obama is President of the US, not Israel.

Posted by: kenhe | January 4, 2011 1:43 PM

Posted by: AndreDeAngelis | January 5, 2011 2:05 AM | Report abuse


Posted by: gord2 | January 4, 2011 6:04 PM

"He is a spy (albeit for a friendly nation, which does matter)"

You're the second Israeli shill to make this argument. Why does spying for a friendly matter, when the secrets were stolen to pass on to America's greatest enemy at the time?

And what is a friendly nation doing spying on it's friend and passing on those secrets to it's greatest enemy?

Posted by: AndreDeAngelis | January 5, 2011 4:49 AM | Report abuse


Posted by: K2K2 | January 4, 2011 6:27 PM

"How do you think the Democratic Party lost my formerly reliable vote?"

So by your own admission, you put your concerns for another country before the one you're living in. Clearly, that's where your loyalties lie.

"Those who call for his continued detention are probably cheering Julian Assange as a hero...hypocrites all."

Julian Assange didn't steal secreat and sell them to our biggest enemies.

Posted by: AndreDeAngelis | January 5, 2011 4:54 AM | Report abuse

Israelis agitating for Pollard's release further strengthen the conviction that Pollard was always an Israeli agent.

Jews agitating for Pollard's release make it look like special pleading for one of their own.

Pollard betrayed not only the United States but every American Jew by placing their loyalty into doubt, especially those American Jews with high security clearances.

Posted by: GWGOLDB | January 5, 2011 6:59 AM | Report abuse

I'm flabbergasted someone else made that Sheinbein connection. Yeah, I'm in no hurry to see Pollard get out, but if the Israelis would agree to start denying Sheinbein's parole starting in '13 ... that might be a reasonable quid pro quo.

Posted by: laboo | January 5, 2011 7:02 AM | Report abuse

What? 26 years (and counting) for spying against his own country? Absolutely!! He betrayed his country for being a traitor. Lucky he was not Iranian. Let him rot. For life!

Posted by: ksm5667 | January 5, 2011 9:17 AM | Report abuse

I'm amazed at the Jewish sympathy for the criminal who single-handedly added a question mark to the patriotism of all US citizens who are Jewish.

Posted by: les8 | January 5, 2011 10:18 AM | Report abuse

AndreDeAngelis:

I am not a "shill" for Israel and I suspect many others have noted that spying for an ally is a relevant consideration. While it is true that there are friendly nations, there are no friendly spy agencies. But it is also fairly self-evident that spying for an ally is not the same as spying for an enemy nation for the simple reason that allies don't use secret information to damage the spied upon nation but rather to bolser their own security against common enemies. You claim that Pollard sold the information to our biggest enemy at the time. Pollard spied in the 1980s. Our biggest enemy at the time was the former Soviet Union. Pollard was indicted and pled to one count of spying for Israel. I am not aware that the secrets were passed on to the Soviet Union. What source do you have for that claim?

Posted by: gord2 | January 5, 2011 10:56 AM | Report abuse

No....he should already have been hanged. Ignorant americans don't seem to realize what Israel really is, an apartheid state ruled by right wings fanatics who get their way by pretending to be of acceptable religious beliefs and play along the "end times" game to keep control of fools.
Israel rivals China for spying on the US though we've propped them up with lives and treasure (they lay down with BushCo, bringing the media they dominate to attack Israel's #1 enemy du jour, Iraq, which, fortunately for them, dovetailed nicely with Bush war and oil profiteering).

By the way, quit including Dershowitz (and though you didn't here David Mamet) in these Israel first propaganda as both these individuals are zionists in liberal clothing.

Posted by: mot2win | January 5, 2011 11:42 AM | Report abuse

gord2:

I don't what you think of the work of Seymour Hersh, very few are neutral about him. Here's a link to a very detailed piece he wrote about Pollard in 1999 that may answer some of your questions. It makes good reading for all who want to know about the case:


http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/fr/576453/posts

Posted by: 54465446 | January 5, 2011 12:57 PM | Report abuse

54465446:

Thanks. I don't think much of Hersh who trades too much in innuendo and conspiracy for my taste, but I am happy to read the piece.

My view is that reasonable people of good faith can reach differenct conclusions as to whether Pollard should have his sentence communted.

What I really wanted to point out was that merely raising the issue brings out the inner anti-Semite in so many. Thanks to so many of the nuts that posted for validating that point.

Posted by: gord2 | January 5, 2011 1:59 PM | Report abuse

Pollard's defenders claim he, like French Capt. Alfred Dreyfus in 1894, is a victim of anti-Semitism in the military. They maintain Pollard was "only" spying for a friendly country, motivated solely by concern for Israel's security. These assertions are patently false. Pollard was suspected for some time of spying. Investigation was held off precisely because of fears of raising cries of anti-Semitism. Pollard took large sums of money and jewelry from Israeli agents in payment for spying.

With remarkable chutzpah, Israel, which receives up to $5 billion in U.S. aid annually, refuses to return documents stolen by Pollard, or allow U.S. intelligence to debrief Mossad agents who ran Pollard in order to learn the full extent of the disaster. While Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu kept calling for Pollard's release on "humanitarian" grounds, he refused to free prisoner of conscience Mordechai Vanunu, now serving 18 years in solitary confinement in Israel for telling a British newspaper about Israel's nuclear arsenal.

Pollard is no Jewish patriot. He is a traitor who sold out his country, and fellow intelligence officers, for money, then claimed he was being persecuted by anti-Semites.

Victim he is not. To the contrary, Pollard is a poster boy for anti-Semitism. His treason unfairly exposes all American Jews to hate, and accusations of doubtful loyalty.

Jonathan Pollard is a traitor of the worst kind - not a second Dreyfus - and should stay in prison.

Posted by: JAMNEW | January 5, 2011 2:15 PM | Report abuse

I honestly don't understand the interest Israel has in Pollard. I would think that they would be embarrassed Pollard got caught spying on their behalf and would want to keep silent on the subject instead of periodically making it a bargaining chip with the United States. While former CIA director Woolsey may not object, another CIA director, George Tenet, as described in his own memoirs, threatened resignation when Netanyahu made Pollard a bargaining chip back in the Clinton days.

I'm very dubious of these so-called geopolitical or antisemetic reasons for his sentence. Unless someone can point to convincing evidence to the contrary, I tend to trust that he had a fair trial, had the chance to appeal, and was sentenced within the limits of the law. If that's not the case, then let him pursue legal remedies within our system.

Posted by: MW11 | January 5, 2011 3:56 PM | Report abuse

500 traitors.

Posted by: wpost16 | January 5, 2011 6:56 PM | Report abuse

Betraying my country is unforgivable. Return Pollard to Israel in a body bag.


Nessus

Posted by: Nessus | January 5, 2011 8:36 PM | Report abuse

It is curious that 500 American citizens would self-identify as defenders of treason. And, really, what could Obama possibly gain from Pollard's release? Does he think that Sheldon Adelson will be his friend?

Posted by: PabloSchwartz | January 5, 2011 11:25 PM | Report abuse

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