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Posted at 8:00 AM ET, 02/ 7/2011

The queen and 'The King's Speech'

By Autumn Brewington

Britain's royal family in May 1945: (from left) Then-Princess Elizabeth, Queen Elizabeth, King George VI and Princess Margaret on the balcony of Buckingham Palace. (AP)


"The King's Speech" has been generating buzz on both sides of the Atlantic -- and may have picked up the royal seal of approval. The Sun reported Friday that Queen Elizabeth II has seen the movie about the stammer her father, King George VI, struggled to overcome and his accession to the throne following the abdication of his brother, King Edward VIII, in 1936. Citing an unnamed source, the paper said the queen found the film "moving" and "enjoyable."


British actor Colin Firth as King George VI in "The King's Speech." (AP)

It's ironic the story emerged this weekend, as Sunday marked the 59th anniversary of the queen's accession to the throne. Her father died at the monarch's country estate, Sandringham, on Feb. 6, 1952. He was 56.

Plans have long been underway to celebrate the diamond anniversary of the queen's accession next year. The Daily Mail suggested in December that Prince William's fiancee, Kate Middleton, would "help pep up the Jubilee's youthful and glamorous face, while also underlining the continuity of the monarchy."

By Autumn Brewington  | February 7, 2011; 8:00 AM ET
Categories:  Kate Middleton, Monarchy, Royal family  
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