Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

Best Buy Digital Photo Frames Shipped With Virus

Electronics retailer Best Buy has pulled a popular brand of digital photo frames from its online and in-store shelves, following reports that many of the devices shipped with computer viruses.

The affected frames are limited to a particular size of Best Buy's own Insignia brand photo frames, the 10.4-ich version (model# NS-DPF10A). Best Buy spokesperson Nissa French said the virus was apparently introduced as some point in the manufacturing process (the devices are made in China).

No word from Best Buy yet on exactly which virus shipped with the frames, but the company claims it is an "older virus which is easily identified and removed by current anti-virus software." It also said that "cameras, USB flash drives and all types of memory cards cannot be infected by the virus by connecting them to or inserting them in the digital picture frame," and that the virus can only infect Microsoft Windows systems after an affected photo frame is plugged into the system.

Best Buy urges any customers who feel they might be affected by this problem to call Insignia customer service at 1-877-467-4289.

Reports of digital devices being contaminated with viruses seem to be popping up more frequently, perhaps because so many modern electronic devices now ship with components that include writable memory. The SANS Internet Storm Center has been chronicling reports of virus infections with other types of digital photo frames, as well as MP3 players and certain hard drives.

By Brian Krebs  |  January 28, 2008; 5:47 PM ET
Categories:  Latest Warnings  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Untraceable or Uncatchable?
Next: RealPlayer Labeled 'Badware'

Comments

"(the devices are made in China)":What is that suppose to mean? It sounded very racist. So what if it was made in China?

Posted by: noname | January 28, 2008 6:48 PM | Report abuse

I think it was very appropriate for you to write the country of origin for these picture frames. That wasn't racist; it was factual and it was the truth.

Posted by: a name | January 28, 2008 7:28 PM | Report abuse

The above 2 comments considered, do we now expect less from products made in China because they are made in China?

Look at the good side -- there was no lead paint on the units shipped ???

Posted by: brucerealtor | January 29, 2008 1:57 AM | Report abuse

Conspiracy theories are fun, but almost never true. Besides, why would China want to package in an older virus other than part of some grand psyops conspiracy (yes, I use that word intenetionally).

The real question is how something like a virus gets into the product. That illustrates clearly a fundamental breakdown in someone's digital security stance. And possibly everyone down the line from where it was introduced...

Posted by: LonerVamp | January 29, 2008 9:21 AM | Report abuse

The information that the devices were made in China was not, to my mind, out of place, but I have to agree in part with 'a name' above that the manner in which it was presented was unfortunate - placing that information in parentheses directly after stating the problem made it look as if Brian regarded 'the devices are made in China' as a necessary and sufficient explanation as to why they - or some of them - were infected with viruses. Given that most of us use computers that are manufactured in China, most of which were *not* infected with viruses when they were purchased new, the condition of being made in China is obviously not sufficient to explain the presence of a virus, nor, given also that many computers have become infected while being used in other countries, is it necessary. But it is certainly the case that both Best Buy and the Chinese manufacturer(s) are going to have investigate to determine where in the manufacturing process the photo frames became infected....

Slightly off-topic, Brian, but do you know of any websites which compare the performances of *firewalls* available for download from the web ? In your column you have several times mentioned Shadowserver for comparing antivirus programmes, which site I find useful, indeed, and I also use AV-Compare, but I've hitherto been unable to find any similar website dedicated to firewalls. Any suggestions ?...

Henri

Posted by: M Henri Day | January 29, 2008 11:57 AM | Report abuse

Take a chill pill, guys! For heavens sakes, they were manufactured in China! Only a fool would not look askance at any (underline any) item manufactured in China these days. The Chinese deserve this scrutiny until they clean their act up. Does anyone remember the abuse post-war Japan took on shoddy and poorly made products labeled "Made in Japan?" Of course, they worked their way past that quickly enough, pioneering in quality improvement techniques, etc. Perhaps when China's leadership decides their place in the world-wide economy is at stake, they'll achieve the same turnaround. Until then, caveat emptor!!

Posted by: Pete from Arlington | January 29, 2008 1:33 PM | Report abuse

Agreed, Pete. Right now, because of the stories that have been made public, Chinese-made products are getting hit with lapses of Quality Control. But I'm typing this on a Lenovo Thinkpad T61 that, like every other Lenovo Thinkpad I've used, is fantastic, flawless, and Made in China. In the end, of course it's caveat emptor.

Posted by: Dan | January 29, 2008 1:53 PM | Report abuse

The mention of original maker doesn't make any sense and it is a bit redundant because 99% of digital photo frames are made in China. Btw, 85% of world products are being manufactured in the Dragon's.

Posted by: vincent | January 29, 2008 10:32 PM | Report abuse

There is always a virus scan for each digital frame at http://us.eoutsourcing.net before shipping. Hopefully, best buy should follow us after this scandal.

Posted by: Vincent | January 29, 2008 10:38 PM | Report abuse

All of the "Made in China" arguments are missing the really important point: namely, the sheer idiocy of having an operating system auto-execute code on removable drives or media. That is a recipe for disaster, whether it's virus-infected picture frames or Sony music CDs with rootkits.

Posted by: rjp | January 30, 2008 10:10 AM | Report abuse

I agree that it is really irrelevant where the product is made. However, I do not think any ethnic slur was intended. Most of the time the country in which a product is made will be noted in any situation. The issue is that it happened. At what point is the virus inserted? This should be the focus.

Posted by: Dennis | January 31, 2008 9:38 AM | Report abuse

To Noname: It's not racist it's nationalism. CodeRed was made in China as well. Lets not forget the attempt to poison US children with lead paint. Let's not forget the russian hacker group that setup shop in china. Stay vigilent. It's a grave mistake to think the coldwar is over.

Posted by: to Noname | January 31, 2008 12:05 PM | Report abuse

the yellow bastards r getting clever we should blow them up

Posted by: Anonymous | January 31, 2008 1:56 PM | Report abuse

Your box says "User reviews and comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site." before commenting, yet I note distinct racism in 2 above posts, as well as unsourced accusations.

I am one of the people who reported to the SANS insitute an infection on a device, and after the originating company checked up, it was a returned piece of hardware that cross-infected the system, and the Quality Control checks missed it.

So lousy protocol for returned hardware, crap system security, and lax QC was the issue.

Posted by: Anonymous | January 31, 2008 6:44 PM | Report abuse

How did talking about a virus get to be racist.
Possibly China being a developing country can't be expected to be as up to date with security matters as the West is.

Posted by: Steve | February 1, 2008 10:53 AM | Report abuse

So now it's worse than this early report, and they've traced the virus or trojan creators to a group in China:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/02/15/BU47V0VOH.DTL

Posted by: Anonymous | February 17, 2008 9:30 AM | Report abuse

Verizon is about the only place you can get the authentic RIM product and matching door. Most other sites are out of stock and even when they are in stock they have the black battery door which looks like crap. http://www.batteryfast.co.uk/digital-photo-frame/
I tested this camera for a client. I didn't have the light running for more than 15 minutes. The battery lasted approximately 6 hours before recharging. The LCD, however, had a few dead pixels - never saw this before. Tried returning for exchange and had to put up quite a fight. Anyone else seen this? http://www.batteryfast.com/digital-photo-frame/
:)

Posted by: lory battery | February 18, 2008 7:49 PM | Report abuse

I'll bet the same people that think blaming the chinese (look at their track record of food and other mfg) would think extra security scrutiny by the air lines of middle eastern 19 to 40 year olds is unfair too. Gee they were the 9/11 terrorists were they not. What is the matter with you. Yes there is!!!!

Posted by: Jim Ballard | February 22, 2008 6:24 PM | Report abuse

The truth is the truth. Please don't deny the truth like in China. THOSE ITEM ARE MANUFACTURED IN CHINA.
Quality controls of Chinese factories are the worst in the world.

Posted by: Chinese Poeple | March 14, 2008 9:41 AM | Report abuse

To the above "Chinese Poeple",
I never thought I would be someone who would not buy something just because of the country of manufacture.People want top dollar to work in a factory. Corporations want bottom dollar on cost of manufacturing. My families, and my friends and I use products which made in China everyday.Year, it is fine.My firend,John Lee which comes from China, told me before "You get all your money's worth." I agree with you, completely. Last week, I ordered some digital photo frame at amazing price from http://www.my-batteries.net/digital-photo-frame.htm, Nice, my litter nephew love it very much.

Posted by: Emily | May 2, 2008 11:05 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company