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Sears's Privacy Promises Broken?

Sears is having a bit of a rough day with the privacy community. The company got off to a rocky start with revelations that many customers who gave Sears their personal details after shopping at the company's Web site also were giving away their online Web browsing habits to marketers, thanks to snooping software silently installed (and ill-documented) by a Sears marketing partner.

Now, it appears the company's Web site may also be making those shopping habits publicly searchable, at least as they relate to products purchased in Sears stores and/or via its Web site.

The discovery comes from Ben Edelman, an assistant professor at the Harvard Business School and a privacy expert whose research has done much to raise public awareness about the intersection of big business and shady advertising practices.

Sears offers no security whatsoever to prevent any user from retrieving a third party's purchase history, Edelman said, which violates its own privacy policy with such disclosures, no part of which "grants Sears the right to share users' purchases with the general public."

"Sears could request information known only to the customer who actually made the prior purchase," such as a code printed on the customer's receipt or the date of purchase, Edelman said. "But Sears does nothing of the kind. Sears only requests name, phone number, and address -- all information available in any White Pages phone book."

To find the purchase history of a shopper at Sears, all one needs to do is create an account at Sears's "managemyhome.com" site, a Web property advertised prominently on Sears.com.

After creating the new account, from the "Home" menu, choose "Home Profile." In the "Search Purchase History" section, press the "Find Your Products" button. You'll be prompted to enter the name, address and phone number of the person whose purchases you wish to view. Then select "Find Products."

If that person has been a Sears shopper, the site will likely display all purchases in its database associated with the specific person, Edelman found. This screenshot shows one such example, which turned up the purchases that his parents' neighbors in Washington, D.C., made going back nearly a decade (their name and address has been blacked out of the screenshot).

It's not yet clear whether the purchase data available on the site includes records of items bought both in Sears retail stores and at Sears.com. Edelman said he believes the ManageMyHome site substantially presents in-store purchase data, but that online purchase data probably also is available as well.

"I have searched for the accounts of several folks who definitely do their purchases in stores, not online," Edelman said in an e-mail to Security Fix. "Their purchase histories come through just as expected."

A Sears spokesperson did not immediately return calls seeking comment. I will update this blog entry in the event that I hear back from Sears.

If you found purchases that you or someone you know made at Sears.com by using the above-described method, please leave a note in the comment section below.

Update, Jan 5, 5:04 p.m. ET: A New York law firm has asked an Illinois judge to approve a class-action suit against Sears for this privacy "oops." See the blog post we put up today about this.

By Brian Krebs  |  January 3, 2008; 6:40 PM ET
Categories:  From the Bunker , U.S. Government  
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Comments

Sears has lost my trust. The gifts I have bought over the years, any friend or family member knowing my personal information could look it up as you describe. I wonder how many other big companies are involved in such practices?

BTW this managemyhome.com website does not work with the Firefox browser (note at the website says it only accepts IE or Netscape 6), and I am not about to increase my security risk by using IE, as your tech cohort Rob Pegoraro favors Firefox for PC security reasons.

Posted by: Fairfax 22033 | January 3, 2008 7:18 PM | Report abuse

The web-site does work with Firefox. It did turn up my information, as you described. Amazing! Another weird thing, is that it also turned up my Jenn-Air oven and Maytag washer, both of which were purchased from Abt Electronics. Is Abt affiliated with Sears? Or might it be that I had Sears service the two products (since Abt's service department is more expensive)?

Posted by: Louis Bell | January 3, 2008 7:36 PM | Report abuse

Well, I'm not too keen on putting my info into their site to see if I'm on it. I hope they take that feature down.

Posted by: A | January 3, 2008 7:53 PM | Report abuse

When I checked my purchases, they all showed up, that's a major security breach

Posted by: hubtones | January 3, 2008 8:04 PM | Report abuse

Yep, typed in the info of the previous owner of our home (we bought 9 yrs ago) b/c I knew she shopped at Sears a lot. (didn't have her phone number, entered a random number.) Got a complete record of her appliance purchases going back to the 80's, which was helpful cuz it tells me how old our hot water heater, range, fridge, etc. are.

Posted by: wow | January 3, 2008 8:05 PM | Report abuse

Using a pseudo account, I found in-store purchases made by my wife, going back 11 years.

Posted by: dan | January 3, 2008 8:10 PM | Report abuse

Sears! Don;t trust them anymore. Dirty rotten #@$#'s

Posted by: Anonymous | January 3, 2008 8:33 PM | Report abuse

I checked my info and also went through the purchases of neighbors and family members throughout the country. The data returned included online and instore purchases. I am absolutely disgusted.

I won't be shopping at Sears again.

Posted by: disgusted | January 3, 2008 8:47 PM | Report abuse

Actually, it seems you only need the last name and either the phone number or the address. So if you know a co-worker's phone number and last name, you can look up what they've purchased.

Posted by: David V | January 3, 2008 8:59 PM | Report abuse

It says the phone numbers I put in are invalid. We use ten-digit numbers here and it won't accept that many digits but if I put in just the seven-digit number (that we have had for 37 years it says it is invalid. So I can't even use it legitimately!

Posted by: Rosie Win | January 3, 2008 9:25 PM | Report abuse

It is fairly easy to set Firefox to accept cookies only for the current session (deleting cookies when the browser is closed), while allowing cookies from specific sites to survive across sessions. This allows the user to stay logged in to selected sites, like Gmail or Yahoo, while ensuring that the marketing-related cookies are deleted whenever she closes the browser. Mungo Says Bah has a nice set of instructions for setting this: up.http://mungobah.blogspot.com/2006/09/how-to-delete-all-cookies-in-firefox-on.html

Posted by: Edward Tufte | January 3, 2008 9:31 PM | Report abuse

It is fairly easy to set Firefox to accept cookies only for the current session (deleting cookies when the browser is closed), while allowing cookies from specific sites to survive across sessions. This allows the user to stay logged in to selected sites, like Gmail or Yahoo, while ensuring that the marketing-related cookies are deleted whenever she closes the browser. Mungo Says Bah has a nice instruction for setting this up: http://mungobah.blogspot.com/2006/09/how-to-delete-all-cookies-in-firefox-on.html

Posted by: Edward Tufte | January 3, 2008 9:33 PM | Report abuse

I put the ten-digit phone numbers in without spaces and it worked. Was able to view our household as well as my sister back to 1993, a church friend, and my nephew in another state. I did have to have all the information -- address and phone number -- or it wouldn't offer me the option to view anything. But that information is certainly easy enough to come by. And in our case, it included in-store purchases.

Posted by: Rosie Win | January 3, 2008 9:44 PM | Report abuse

I just tried it, too, and it brought up four purchases.

Posted by: alexva | January 3, 2008 10:12 PM | Report abuse

I was able to bring up the purchases made by one of my brothers in 1998 and my stepfather just a few weeks ago. (I can't find myself using any method mentioned above, but I haven't purchased major appliances there either - that might make the difference.)

Anyhow, isn't this just "wonderful"

Posted by: olevia | January 3, 2008 10:34 PM | Report abuse

os x using safari camino -- the site is not fully compatible thus using those browsers did not experience the privacy 'bug' problem; no options to search history; wouldn't stay logged in.

but it worked in firefox on mac

+ i found this
http://www.managemyhome.com/mmh/html/browser_stats.html

the lawsuits will probably begin tomorrow!

Posted by: doesn't work in safari camino | January 3, 2008 10:43 PM | Report abuse

pretty cool feature - I have been trying to demonstrate the importance of security on our company network and now have a new tool to help illustrate the issue to people who just don't get it

BK try to come up with a more interesting retailer next time - I really don't care what hot water heater and appliances my coworkers have - although perhaps someone criminally inclined could set-up a service appointment for someone with an extended warranty and get them to open their house up

Posted by: OhioMC | January 4, 2008 12:59 AM | Report abuse

Ok .. for all of you who tried this .. including me, check this article:

http://community.ca.com/blogs/securityadvisor/archive/2007/12/20/sears-com-join-the-community-get-spyware.aspx

BK .. please check this stuff next time.

Now .. how do we get this s*** off our computers???

Posted by: lonewolf | January 4, 2008 3:31 AM | Report abuse

lonewolf> check this article

Yes, Bk has a link to that page at the top of his article. Not sure what you're trying to say...?

Posted by: antibozo | January 4, 2008 4:11 AM | Report abuse


antibozo ...

>> Not sure what you're trying to say <<

That I was stupid! :)

Posted by: lonewolf | January 4, 2008 4:26 AM | Report abuse

does this affect KMART ?

Posted by: smallcage | January 4, 2008 8:08 AM | Report abuse

I tried it, and got my dad's purchases.

Posted by: popslashgirl | January 4, 2008 8:36 AM | Report abuse

Sears has really done it now. I cannot believe that they would allow ANYONE (that knows a person's address) to see what they have purchased. Let's just say that they will get a nasty email, phonecall, and letter from me. I was disgusted to see this information being available. We all should ban together and get the lawsuit rollng.

Posted by: bguff14 | January 4, 2008 9:24 AM | Report abuse

@OhioMC - Yeah, I was thinking the same thing. Still checking to see if this involves both service-oriented and sales purchases at Sears. I had thought of mentioning the social engineering aspect of this oops -- in case anyone said "what's the privacy problem here?", but didn't want to give folks bad ideas.

Posted by: Bk | January 4, 2008 9:33 AM | Report abuse

Not only did I find my own purchases, after creating a fictitious account, I was also able to see my neighbors' records. Also, at least one of the recorded purchases under my name is not something I ever bought, and it was before I moved into the house in which I currently live.

The privacy policy posted only covers data that I submit while on this web site - it does not protect data they already have.

From now on, I buy from Sears with cash only and no identification.

Posted by: David | January 4, 2008 9:42 AM | Report abuse

Wow. They've got Dad's purchases going back years. To late last century.

Posted by: wiredog | January 4, 2008 10:05 AM | Report abuse

Looks like a friend of mine buys all his major appliances at Sears.
If only I could find my house's previous owner's phone number I could find out some useful information.

Posted by: Holy Cow! | January 4, 2008 10:36 AM | Report abuse

It really bothers me to see the Washington Post publish an obvious grammatical error.

The possessive of Sears = Sears'

Not Sears's

Posted by: Bo | January 4, 2008 10:46 AM | Report abuse

@Bo- The headline is correct because it is the possessive of a singular noun. Per The Washington Post's Style book.

b. Use 's to form the possessive of singular nouns, proper names and nicknames ending in a sounded s: Lucas's new movie, the boss's secretary, the Boss's big concert, the chorus's big moment, the lass's skirt, Philip Glass's opera, Mars's anger, Zeus's wife, James's book, Dr. Seuss's books. But use the apostrophe alone for ancient and biblical proper names of more than one syllable ending in -es: Demosthenes' orations, Xerxes' conquests. (But: Gonzales's nomination, Frances's recipe.)

Posted by: Bk | January 4, 2008 10:55 AM | Report abuse

Posted by: kdt | January 4, 2008 10:58 AM | Report abuse

@KDT - As someone mentioned earlier in the comments, that link you just posted is included in the first sentence of this blog post.

Posted by: Bk | January 4, 2008 11:03 AM | Report abuse

Brian, please let us know in a follow-up post when the class-action lawsuit starts and how to join in.

Posted by: bc | January 4, 2008 11:05 AM | Report abuse

they have my friend's parents purchases going back to 1981!

Posted by: graeme | January 4, 2008 11:25 AM | Report abuse

Bk> Per The Washington Post's Style book.

Which is correct.

If you review style manuals throughout the 20th century (start with Strunk and White) you'll find that this was the consistent style up until the 80s or so, when idiots who can't spell (e.g. Associated Press) started taking over, at which point manuals such as Chicago began to grant discretion to editors on singulars ending with s which also have a z final sound (e.g. "Sears'" but not "boss'")--and ultimately all words ending with s--but still recommended the Post's historically correct style.

Just think about it. One writes the possessive just as it is pronounced. "Sears" is a confusing case because unless you know the origin of the name you may think it's a plural, so let's use something that is clearly not plural. Imagine you're at a bar with a guy named William and a guy named Williams. Someone walks in and asks, "Whose car is parked outside? It's being towed." If it's actually Williams's car, how would you respond?

Posted by: aeschylus | January 4, 2008 11:28 AM | Report abuse

Wow. My motto is everything you want to know is on the internet. They've got my dryer, washer, washer to replace broken washer, two garage door openers, one that replaced another and a television I don't remember purchasing a decade ago. Purchases went back to 1991. Found my brother's purchases also. Scary stuff. I hope they fix that quickly. Yike. This just confirms that I should pay for stuff with cash and register products under my alias.

Posted by: Maddy | January 4, 2008 12:17 PM | Report abuse

I was amazed that, upon purchase of a DVD-recorder in the store, that Sears asked for my phone number and address. When I told the cashier that I'd rather not release that info, she said I *HAD* to give it to her, as the register would not let her complete the sale without it. Finally, after the manager did not know how to override the system, I gave them a fake address and phone number so I could at least check out. This same situation happened again when I purchased a $49 vacuum cleaner. I can understand why you need to give an address for deliveries, but I was taking this merchandise with me so I didn't understand why I had to give them the information. At the time I thought to myself, eh, go ahead, just give it to them. Am I glad I didn't!

Posted by: HeyFK | January 4, 2008 1:19 PM | Report abuse

@Bc- Stay tuned. I don't think it will be long.

Posted by: Bk | January 4, 2008 1:41 PM | Report abuse

I bet someone will start using this for evil soon if they don't plug this hole NOW!

Imagine, a scam artist first does a reverse yellow page lookup to grab free names, phone numbers and addresses by street name. Then they go to the Sears Manage My Home webpage and look up the purchases for those people. Then he notes which clients have Protection Agreements / Extended warranties through Sears that are close to expiration. Then he mails or calls them pretending to be a Sears rep and offers the victim the ability to extend their warranty at a low rate. Then he grabs their Credit Card info and off he goes...

Seriously, though, the potential for abuse of this is more than you think.

BMR777
http://www.rusnakweb.com/src

Posted by: BMR777 | January 4, 2008 1:45 PM | Report abuse

For the record, "Heather" first uncovered this issue by posting a comment to the original Sears discovery here:
http://community.ca.com/blogs/securityadvisor/archive/2007/12/20/sears-com-join-the-community-get-spyware.aspx

and then later followed up here:
http://community.ca.com/blogs/securityadvisor/archive/2008/01/03/managemyhome-com-another-privacy-issue-for-sears.aspx


The original comment post:

"Heather said:
OMG! Check out a sears site managemyhome.com. Once you register you can look up purchase information for ANYONE by just putting in their name address and phone number. Sears has you enter a code and says that keeps you info safe, but that is pretty useless -- I think that just prevents a script from being created, but DOES NOT stop people from entering in any eles info to get the purchase info on big ticket items -- this could bring casing someone's house to a whole new level!!

I contacted the privace e-mail that the site provided, but no one ever responded. Anyone with any ideas about how to get this service off the web, I would be open to suggestions."

Posted by: web user | January 4, 2008 1:46 PM | Report abuse

I wonder who else bought that web site framework besides Sears ?

Posted by: GTexas | January 4, 2008 1:48 PM | Report abuse

Generally, IF I go to a store and they need this type of information, I tell the cashier to put in anything. I NEVER give them the info, because they NEVER could explain why they need it. Plus, once you use your card, to void the transaction they need to get a key or the manager. Usually, they don't want to waste time doing that, especially with people standing in line. And why store the fact that I bought a 12-inch TV over 10 years ago in a file?

Obviously, the retailers don't care and need to be forced to do anything about protecting our private information. Now, if we could only get Congress to worry about protecting our identities rather then say, steroids, we would be on to something.

Posted by: umm.huh | January 4, 2008 2:48 PM | Report abuse

I think the feature has been removed now. I actually wanted to know how old my house's dishwasher was, though!

Posted by: A | January 4, 2008 3:20 PM | Report abuse

I can't find the Search Purchase History button - perhaps they have already removed it?

Posted by: j3p | January 4, 2008 3:27 PM | Report abuse

Is there a way to find the spyware on my computer and get rid of it?

Posted by: jp | January 4, 2008 3:32 PM | Report abuse

Yes, it was at https://www.managemyhome.com/mmh/kitchendrawer/DisplayCustomerLookup.action?category= where you can still see the form, but it now says this after you hit submit:
We're sorry, this feature is currently disabled. Please visit again soon.

Posted by: A | January 4, 2008 3:36 PM | Report abuse

CA's website shows the files and registy keys for the tracking software.

http://ca.com/us/securityadvisor/pest/pest.aspx?id=453122717

There should be an entry in Add/Remove in the Control Panel where you can uninstall it.

Posted by: suzi | January 4, 2008 5:04 PM | Report abuse

I use the Manage My Home site. It works great. You guys act like you discovered some kind of national security breach. Sears was just trying to do something good to help their customers. It helped me. Then you want to turn it around like it some kind of evil conspiracy. The only people who would have used the site view other people's Sears purchases were dishonest individuals. So Sears may have made a mistake in making it too easy for dishonest individuals to view other people's Sears purchases. This mistake was done in the context of helping people. Shouldn't that count for something. You pointed it out, Sears will fix it. Move on. Throw stones at someone else who made a mistake trying to help people.

Posted by: Julie | January 5, 2008 4:45 AM | Report abuse

Julie> Sears was just trying to do something good to help their customers.

I see. And I suppose T.J. Maxx and ChoicePoint were just trying to help their customers as well. And if I ask your local video store for a list of all the movies you've rented, or your local library for a list of all the books you've checked out, or your local pharmacist for a list of all the medications you've purchased, they should all do something good and share all that information without being presented any form of authentication.

Do you shop at Sears? Should anyone in the world be able to find out the color of your underwear, the firmness of your mattress, and the thread count of your bedsheets?

Do you really have no idea what "expectation of privacy" is, and how fundamental it is to the workings of our society?

Posted by: antibozo | January 5, 2008 6:45 AM | Report abuse

Julie said:
"You guys act like you discovered some kind of national security breach. Sears was just trying to do something good to help their customers."

Are you in third grade, or just stupid? To not understand the possible security threat this poses is beyond naive and just dumb!!!

The statement "the service was intended for people who are honest" is even more idiotic! Do you truly think the internet was developed for people who are just, "nice?" If that's the case, I have a great deal on extended warranty for your appliances. Just reply to this post with your credit card information and I will gladly sign you up - JEEZE!!!

Get a clue. Large corporations have a responsibility to keep customer information safe - and not out in the public eye.

Posted by: Heather | January 5, 2008 3:27 PM | Report abuse

Has anyone considered the amount of good this company has done in helping people. They have been a huge supporter of the Extreme Home Makeover efforts. The only person who get's rich in a 'class action' suit are lawyers. They see $$signs and deep pockets in large companies and encite people to join in the riot. They and anyone who wants to join with them should be ashamed of themselves. Our society is so disgustingly litigious, out to stick it to anyone for the almighty dollar. All the while you hurt ALL consumers because the associated costs of legal defense that has to be passed on to future buyers. Suffer a little perceived injustice, it'll build character in you and demonstrate some SORELY needed traits in our nation ... MERCY & GRACE.

Posted by: david | January 5, 2008 3:35 PM | Report abuse

david> Suffer a little perceived injustice, it'll build character in you

For all we know, a great deal of fraud has been perpetrated by abusers of this system. See Heather's post above for an example of how this could happen. Or imagine that someone calls you saying they're from Sears and there was a problem with the charge processing for the Honeywell XX32 Space Heater you bought yesterday--please provide the credit card number and CVV again so we can correct it. There's a lot more than "perceived injustice" at stake here. Computer-based fraud accounts for billions of dollars in losses per year. People lose their retirement funds, their stock portfolios, and their life savings as a result. To consider holding Sears accountable when they may have contributed significantly to this problem is hardly an example of excessive litigiousness.

Posted by: antibozo | January 5, 2008 4:28 PM | Report abuse

Take a look, Kamber Edelson, the same firm that won the Sony class action filed one against Sears on Friday. They sure didn't hesitate on jumping on this one!

http://blog.washingtonpost.com/securityfix/2008/01/class_action_suit_alleges_sear.html

What I would really like to know is how the people in charge of this website could be so stupid. The 1st thing they should have done was create a secure way for people to access thier data. They obviously know NOTHING about ecommerce sites.

Posted by: heatherh | January 5, 2008 4:30 PM | Report abuse

David: If you think Sears gives product to Extreme Makeover out of the good of their hearts you are smoking crack!! First of all, the show is a HUGE money maker in and of itself and Sears pays big bucks to be a part of it becuase it is GREAT ADVERTISING and that's it. They get far more out of being on the show in good will and advertising than they put in.

Posted by: Heather | January 5, 2008 4:34 PM | Report abuse

I received an email from Manage My Home thanking me for a recent purchase. No such purchase exists. I contacted Sears. They told me they were unfamiliar with the email I had received from Manage My Home, advised me not to follow any links, then suggested I go online and check out all their great offers.

They gave me no suggestion that they were looking into the security breach nor did they offer to help get to the bottom of the breach.

Sorry Sears, I won't be shopping online anymore.

Posted by: Michael M | January 6, 2008 5:09 AM | Report abuse

Michael M> I received an email from Manage My Home thanking me for a recent purchase. No such purchase exists.

Maybe it was phishing.

Posted by: antibozo | January 6, 2008 5:53 AM | Report abuse

Michael -- are you opted in or out of e-mail communications with Sears? If you are opted out, they could be in violation of e-mail privacy rules as well (big shocker!!)

Was the e-mail from Manage My Home trying to get you to do anything (join the service, purchase a waranty?)

Would you (or anyone else who recieved such an e-mail) mind sending me a copy of the e-mail you recieved? My e-mail address is cometogether73223@gmail.com

Thanks

Posted by: heatherh | January 6, 2008 8:52 AM | Report abuse

What's wrong with the government or a business knowing about every book you have read or checked out of a library? You could not possibly read something so deviant that a million other people have not read.

Maybe if they knew this information they could suggest a book you might like or offer you a two for one deal that you might not get otherwise?

Posted by: John | January 6, 2008 12:42 PM | Report abuse

John> What's wrong with the government or a business knowing about every book you have read or checked out of a library?

What's wrong is that it's the kind of information that has been used for political oppression and unethical business practice for ages.

John> Maybe if they knew this information they could suggest a book you might like or offer you a two for one deal that you might not get otherwise?

Or give you a nice cell at Guantanamo.

Here are some resources for your review:

"FBI in your Library"
http://www.ala.org/Template.cfm?Section=ifissues&Template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=21662
[News and articles helping librarians interpret laws and trends in library privacy policy.]

"Libraries and National Security"
http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_12/starr/
"... In addition to information restriction, military authorities also requested librarians' assistance in patron surveillance. In the spring of 1918, military intelligence issued an order to remove from libraries any materials on explosives, as well as to report the names of requestors to the Army..."
"... On 4 June 1987, two FBI agents entered Columbia University's Mathematics and Science Library and asked a clerk about foreign library users (Schmidt, 1989b)..."

"State Laws on the Confidentiality of Library Records"
http://library-privacy.wikispaces.com/
[Information on the various state laws prohibiting access to library records.]

"The Video Privacy Protection Act (VPPA)"
http://epic.org/privacy/vppa/
"The Video Privacy Protection Act of 1988 (codified at 18 U.S.C. § 2710 (2002)) was passed in reaction to the disclosure of Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork's video rental records in a newspaper..."

Posted by: antibozo | January 6, 2008 6:49 PM | Report abuse

Yes, the real buffoon here is Jim Hilt the director of Manage My Home. See this article that Ben highlighted in his article about what Manage My Home was doing. Jim is freely talking about the benefit.

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4155/is_20071109/ai_n21104858

This guy definitely gets the award for the stupidest web marketer of the year! Think I'll shoot him and Alwyn an e-mail and let them know what I think about them giving out my personal information to the general public. Since they were so free with my info, I don't have a problem sharing their info -- I got Alwyn's e-mail address from a posting on the ca website Alewis1@searshc.com -- I would guess that Jim's e-mail address is Jhilt00@searshc.com or jhilt01@searshc.com.

Posted by: mike m | January 7, 2008 10:24 AM | Report abuse

Interesting how many people are trying this to find data on people other than themselves. It's clear privacy isn't that important to some people unless it's their own.

Posted by: kd | January 7, 2008 11:00 AM | Report abuse

kd> Interesting how many people are trying this to find data on people other than themselves.

How many? Whom are you referring to?

Posted by: antibozo | January 7, 2008 11:48 AM | Report abuse

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