Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

FBI Warns of Hit Man Scam Resurgence

The FBI is warning people not to be disturbed by an e-mail scam that threatens your life and orders you to pay up to avoid being the target of a hired hit man.

The FBI said its Internet Crime Complaint Center continues to receive thousands of reports concerning the hit man e-mail scheme. The FBI notes that while the content of the missive has evolved since similar hit man scams first surfaced in late 2006, the message remains the same, claiming the sender has been hired to kill the recipient.

In some cases, the use of names, titles, addresses, and telephone numbers of government officials and business executives, and/or the victims' personal information are used in an attempt to make the fraud appear more authentic, the FBI said.

I've heard about these scams before, but never actually seen one of the e-mails until today. Below is a copy of one of the scams making the rounds now.

"Dear Friend,

Goodday to you.

Am very sorry for you my friend, is a pity that this is how your life is going to end as soon as you don't comply. As you can see there is no need of introducing myself to you because I don't have any business with you, my duty as I am mailing you now is just to KILL/ASSASINATE you and I have to do it as I have already been paid for that.

Someone you call a friend wants you Dead by all means, and the person have spent a lot of money on this, the person also came to us and told me that he want you dead and he provided us with your name, picture and other necessary information's we needed about you. So I sent my boys to track you down and they have carried out the necessary investigation needed for the operation on you, and they have done that but I told them not to kill you that I will like to contact you and see if your life is Important to you or not since their findings shows that you are innocent.

More of the hit man scam e-mail after the jump.

I called my client back and ask him of you email address which I didn't tell him what I wanted to do with it and he gave it to me and I am using it to contact you now. As I am writing to you now my men are monitoring you and they are telling me everything about you.

Now do you want to LIVE OR DIE? As someone has paid us to kill you. Get back to me now if you are ready to pay some fees to spare your life, If you are not ready for my help, then I will carry on with my job straight-up.

WARNING: DO NOT THINK OF CONTACTING THE POLICE OR EVEN TELL ANYONE BECAUSE I WILL KNOW. REMEMBER, SOMEONE WHO KNOWS YOU VERY WELL WANT YOU DEAD! I WILL EXTEND IT TO YOUR FAMILY, IN CASE I NOTICE SOMETHING FUNNY.

DO NOT COME OUT ONCE IT IS 7:30PM UNTIL I MAKE OUT TIME TO SEE YOU AND GIVE YOU THE TAPE OF MY DISCUSSION WITH THE PERSON WHO WANT YOU DEAD AFTER YOU HAVE COMPLIED WITH MY DEMANDS, THEN YOU CAN USE IT TO TAKE ANY LEGAL ACTION. GOOD LUCK AS I AWAIT YOUR REPLY

Regards

By Brian Krebs  |  August 29, 2008; 10:35 AM ET
Categories:  Fraud , Latest Warnings , Safety Tips , U.S. Government  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Report Slams U.S. Host as Major Source of Badware
Next: Firefox Plug-in Offers Clarity on Web Site Security

Comments

Stupid Nigerians.

Posted by: Karl | August 29, 2008 12:54 PM | Report abuse

20006, a wee bit in the future?

Posted by: Russ O'Connell | August 29, 2008 1:32 PM | Report abuse

I wonder why this is left to the FBI and not fully investigated and tracked down by DHS in general. The 4-1-9 schemes are one thing, playing on greed alone; it's arguable that this is actual terrorism, though it's used for monetary rather than political gain.

Bk, you have a typo, "20006".

Posted by: antibozo | August 29, 2008 1:36 PM | Report abuse

"20006, a wee bit in the future?"

The hit man has been sent back from the future.

/cue Terminator theme song

Posted by: Charles Decker | August 29, 2008 1:38 PM | Report abuse

I received this one recently:

Hey We have hijacked your baby but you must pay once to us $50 000. The details we will send later...

We has attached photo of your fume

Posted by: Hlabadie | August 29, 2008 1:40 PM | Report abuse

Ooooh, make-out time is 7:30. I'm gettin' some action tonight, PC, no need for internet porn for this guy anymore!

Posted by: THJ | August 29, 2008 1:45 PM | Report abuse

I email them back saying they screwed up and picked on a CIA employee, and that a hellfire armed Preditor UAV is enroute to their location as I type, and even if they survive the strike they are heading to Gitmo, and I'll see them at the waterboarding room.......turn about is fair play.

Posted by: Truth hurts | August 29, 2008 1:47 PM | Report abuse

I have a hard time fathoming how anyone can be so gullible as to fall for this. It's ridiculous. If people just think for one second about it, they would realize that.

They just need to think of how many decent spam blockers there are out there; if the emails were real, literally thousands of people would be killed every day.

I suppose they wouldn't send them out if they didn't work on at least on a small percentage of people. It's hard to feel sorry for them though. That sounds harsh but come on people, have one little modicum of common sense!

Posted by: hokiealumnus | August 29, 2008 4:24 PM | Report abuse

I would say...

Bring it on, my tommy gun is waiting for you. Even if you decide not to come for me, I'm coming for you now. You've pissed off a member of the mafia family and we don't take kindly to that. I'm afraid you and your entire family tree are gonna be swimming with the fishes very very soon.

Posted by: Rabbit | August 30, 2008 12:59 AM | Report abuse

That "we have hijacked your baby" has malware attached to it ..

Posted by: Suresh Ramasubramanian | August 30, 2008 11:35 AM | Report abuse

This is such BS! for one thing, there are a TON of grammatical errors. Someone this into it would take the time and effort most likely to minimize any possibility of getting caught. second, there is no personal information given. why would anyone fall for this? thirdly? whats to gain from this? it didn't demand a social security number or checking account numbers or specific ransom at all. This must be complete BS

I recently got one from a craigslist ad, except it was a 'woman' replying to my WANT add about buying what i wanted to buy, offering me twice as much for 'my' product when she could buy it herself new for half of the price she was offering, and she wanted me to send it to her son in Nigeria. now thats messed up...total scam.

Posted by: QWERTY | August 30, 2008 12:12 PM | Report abuse

I must say, he is a very polite assassin, with his 'dear friend' and 'good day to you' greetings, and his 'regards' at the end.
As if an a trained assassin for hire, with 'the boys' at his disposal and with the payment in his bank account, would try and bargain with his intended target! Are there really people who would fall for this rot?

Posted by: Jessica | September 1, 2008 5:36 PM | Report abuse

I'm sorry, but if someone is hired to kill you, I doubt very much that they would be getting in touch to warn you. It wouldn't make them look very professional to their next client now, would it?

As for there not being any personal information, that would be because they don't have any. This will have undoubtedly come from a hijacked server somewhere, no doubt sent out by some stupid script-kiddy.

Grow up.

Posted by: Really scraed | September 1, 2008 8:03 PM | Report abuse

It seems like a few successful sting operations by the police, FBI, and probably a foreign government would stop this particular scam. The content of these emails means that law enforcement would have more serious criminal laws to bring to bear that could involve considerable jail time. Make an example out of a few unlucky jerks.

I've gotten a couple of the traditional "nigerian prince" email scams, and I can laugh that off. I've never gotten an email like this though, and even knowing that it's fake, I suspect I'd still feel uneasy about it. [I know, any real hitman that let his target buy him off would shortly have a hit out on him as well]

So like I said, sting operation to make a few examples. Hopefully that would restore a modicum of civility to email scams.

Posted by: ugh | September 2, 2008 1:02 AM | Report abuse

The intellect of these Nigerian baboons
is on par with that of our current administration. So the fact 50% of US citizens voted for this Bozo; I suspect their are many in this country who will go to their beds & place their heads under their Pillows & cry for Mommy!!!.

Posted by: Audiophile 2008 | September 2, 2008 1:01 PM | Report abuse

Goddam nigerians came up with a new scam, I see.

Hey, if McCain wants to start another war to distract us from how the 'uglicans are driving the country into the ground, Nigeria would be a target that a lot of people would applaud.

-- faye kane, homeless brain
Read more of my smartmouth opinions at http://blog.myspace.com/fayekane

Posted by: Faye Kane | September 2, 2008 4:14 PM | Report abuse

Y'mean people actually believed that crap??? MORONS!

Posted by: Chuckie | September 2, 2008 5:19 PM | Report abuse

@ Truth hurts and Others:
"Turn about is (almost) always fair play" except when replying and revealing your real live email address to these boobs. At least they are smart enought to harvest your turn about reply email address and sell it to other scammers. Hopefully, you were savvy enough to reply anonymously.

Posted by: Pete from Arlington | September 3, 2008 10:58 AM | Report abuse

I recently received one of these e-mails recently.
As I have an attude propblem with bullies, this was my response.
Come-on mudderfu----. I have a 12guage shotgun wait for you. I will ram it up you a-- and blow carpet tacks and rocksalt out of you bull------- mouth if I see you within one mile of my family.
Since then I've not received any more threats.

Posted by: Pattie | September 3, 2008 11:18 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company