Advocacy Group Aims to Energize Health Care Debate

A small-business lobbying group launched a campaign this morning focusing on comprehensive health care reform.

As part of the "Solutions Start Here" effort unveiled at the National Press Club, the National Federation of Independent Business released a set of 10 small business principles for health care reform.

Health care should be universal, the group said, by enabling all Americans to have access to quality care and that a "government safety net should enable the neediest to obtain coverage."

NFIB also said Americans should receive their health insurance and health care through the private sector to the greatest extent possible. The group, which unveiled a Web site - www.fixedforamerica.com - outlining its efforts, also touted the need for "portable" health care, meaning that Americans should be able to switch jobs without losing health coverage.

New data from the group show that nationally, 51 percent of small-business owners and 47 percent of their employees say they have had difficulty keeping up with the cost of health care. On average, they pay 18 percent more for the same health care benefits as larger corporations. The group defined small firms as having 250 or less employees.

NFIB this morning sent letters to the campaigns of presidential front-runners Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama and John McCain apprising them of the sorry state of health care for small firms. In the letters, the group noted that of the 46 million Americans who are uninsured, approximately 27 million are small business owners, their employees and their families.

"Despite the fact that small business generates half of America's GDP, the overall strength of this population is often overlooked by politicians, pundits and the news media," said the NFIB in a release. A poll the group spearheaded on Feb. 5, a day known as Super Tuesday for the large number of presidential primaries held, found that the small business voting bloc is influential and equal to, or larger than, well-established voting blocs, such as veterans and union members.

Small Business Readers: Do you think comprehensive health care reform is needed to better consider the needs of small businesses, their employees and their families? Do you feel you have a voice in the debate? Please post your comments below.

By Sharon McLoone |  March 12, 2008; 2:55 PM ET Regulation Legislation
Previous: SBA Launches Inner-City Initiative | Next: President Bush Tips Hat to Small Firms

Comments

Please email us to report offensive comments.



Speaking of advocacy...

re : Florida and Michigan

Where can Seniors GET THEIR VOICE HEARD, that they don't feel represented, and to demand their rights to vote in a setting that doesn't require them to caucus!

Caucuses require standing in lines, typically have large boisterous crowds. Seniors may feel insecure, off balance,or confused. They may have difficulty hearing and seeing, and with transportation in the evening, etc. Caucuses are limited in the number of people that can even vote and are allowed in the chosen building. All of these conditions come together to deny seniors and the disabled their right to vote in an accessible way. Caucuses favor the young and fanatic.

Posted by: thinktank | March 12, 2008 3:53 PM

The government caused the entire problem with health care in America by over socializing (with unfunded mandates) medicine to the extent it is not completive. The government allows a monopolistic pharmaceutical environment, and the FDA a federal agency failing American citizens and needs be eliminated or completely re-organized; it's corrupt, and is causing a major impact on the cost of healthcare in America, and we want to exacerbate the problem? http://www.InteliOrg.com/

Posted by: Dr Coles | March 12, 2008 6:08 PM

To get more businesses to support the "Solutions Start Here" effort, NFIB may want to encourage point-of-service diagnostic imaging which can substantially reduce workplace absenteeism (which is good for small business). Xoran Technologies makes specialty CT scanners -- with remarkably low radiation. Their CT scanners are uniquely small, high quality and low radiation. By placing a scanner where the patient is, the healthcare system wins by cutting down on multiple office visits (i.e. multiple claims) and copays. The patient can walk into their physician's office and leave with a diagnosis and course of treatment - all within the same visit. Brilliant.

Posted by: Karen L. Swisher, DPM | March 13, 2008 12:32 PM

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 

© 2010 The Washington Post Company