Small Firms Speak Out at GOP Convention

A handful of entrepreneurs will be speaking at the Republican National Convention this evening in St. Paul, Minn., to discuss the state of small businesses in America.

Anne Beiler, the founder of Auntie Anne's Pretzels of Lancaster, Pa., is scheduled to talk about the "prosperity of the spirit, not just the pocketbook" at 6:18 p.m. Central.

Renee Amoore is slated to speak shortly after Beiler. She started the Amoore Group, an organization committed to healthcare reform.

Ruth Novodor, CEO of Beverly Oncology and Imaging Medical Group in Montebello, Calif., plans to speak on small firms as the future for new jobs at 7:07 p.m. Central.

She will be followed by Christy Swanson, the co-owner of CKB Swanson of Quinton, Va., a cooking oil filtration firm. Swanson is slated to talk at 7:13 p.m. Central about small businesses and their place as the cornerstone of the future.

Meg Whitman, the former CEO and president of online auction house eBay, is also scheduled to speak shortly after Swanson.

Check out washingtonpost.com's Live Video Coverage to watch the speeches. Times are subject to change.

The Democrats also showcased small firms at their convention last week in Denver. For example, Angela Morgan of Alexandria, Va., a small business owner who served nine years in the Marines lead the pledge of allegiance on Tuesday and Nancy Floyd, owner of energy technology investment firm Nth Power of Portland, Ore., spoke before the crowd.

By Sharon McLoone |  September 3, 2008; 5:25 PM ET Election 2008
Previous: Women Business Owners Set Sights on Capitol Hill | Next: Billionaire Offers Entrepreneurial Help Online

Comments

Please email us to report offensive comments.



How to attract and keep good people is a growing problem for all businesses, across all industries, especially so when we talk about Gen X and Y.

http://www.tactips.com/

Posted by: Business | September 4, 2008 12:37 AM

How to attract and keep good people is a growing problem for all businesses, across all industries, especially so when we talk about Gen X and Y.

http://www.tactips.com/

Posted by: Business | September 4, 2008 12:38 AM

All female entrepreneurs. I don't have a problem with that, but doesn't it seem odd? What is the proportion of female to male entrepreneurs anyway?

Posted by: Chuck | September 4, 2008 2:17 PM

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 

© 2010 The Washington Post Company