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Possession Game

Soccer on the front page of a major U.S. daily for the sixth consecutive day? It's true.

Wednesday: Gallardo feature.
Thursday: Hamlett feature.
Friday: United-Fire match.
Saturday: USA women feature.
Sunday: USA-Canada match and Mike Wise's Ben Olsen column.
Today's offering: Paul Tenorio's excellent feature on the emergence of possession soccer in Northern Virginia high schools.

Give it a read. Tell us what you think.

By Steve Goff  |  May 12, 2008; 12:11 AM ET
Categories:  Preps  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Mother? Not Mother?
Next: The Good, The Bad, The Coyote Ugly

Comments

Front page of the sports section, you mean? FIRST!

Posted by: IJC | May 12, 2008 1:14 AM | Report abuse

Hey, nothing wrong with that. It's what happens when you have talented and knowledgeable journalists covering a sport with growing general interest. Glad the Post keeps up, stays relevant, and even helps set these trends.

Posted by: viv | May 12, 2008 1:23 AM | Report abuse

I played against Paul back in high school.
Mount Vernon versus West Potomac (senior year)

Posted by: jaguar515 | May 12, 2008 3:15 AM | Report abuse

Perhaps it's time to renwew the subscription to the Washington Post?

Posted by: 12th man | May 12, 2008 1:08 PM | Report abuse

Good, the blog is finally fixed...

Great article about possession soccer.

Posted by: RK | May 12, 2008 1:14 PM | Report abuse

It is vital for US Soccer that high school coaches get better. This has been the drop off point for most US players, and it's exactly the time when kids go from playing with their club a few times a week, to then having high school practice every day of the week. So this is a great trend. But schools and clubs still need to do a better job of working together because the college recruiting process is still focused on club teams, but as I said earlier, the high school teams have way more training time together.

Posted by: Sean G | May 12, 2008 1:42 PM | Report abuse

Great article both in terms of it's high school soccer content as well as explaining quality soccer versus kick and run for newbies. This should be required reading for every Mom and Dad who sit on the sidelines of youth soccer games telling little Timmy to "Boot it! Boot it!".

Posted by: Todd H. | May 12, 2008 5:45 PM | Report abuse

At this time (Monday at 6:00 p.m.), Tenorio's article is 16th on the list of the Post's 20 most emailed articles, a feat that none of the other articles managed to achieve:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/mostemailed/index.html

Posted by: tri-village | May 12, 2008 6:09 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: Whatever | May 12, 2008 6:13 PM | Report abuse

It's an excellent article, does a great job of explaining some of the nuances of the game in terms newbies would get. Well done!

Posted by: edgeonyou | May 12, 2008 6:55 PM | Report abuse

i don't really agree with this article. unless tenorio's referring to all teams in the area attempting to play soccer the way it should be, then there is nothing new here. the top area programs have been playing possession soccer for more than the past 5 years. and really, who cares about high school soccer or thinks it should be the barometer - the best soccer is played at the club level.

Posted by: hokie soccer fan | May 12, 2008 7:09 PM | Report abuse

Hokie soccer fan: the fact that you know this, and that the average reader of Steve's blog knows this, shouldn't obscure the value of this article to the mainstream Post sports page reader.

It is what it is, a grass roots article on soccer development on the front page of the Post's sports page. Don't expect it to pander to the existing, blog reading soccer fan.

Posted by: JkR | May 12, 2008 7:57 PM | Report abuse

Just to pile on -- great article on possession!

Posted by: Curious | May 12, 2008 8:19 PM | Report abuse

At this time (Monday at 6:00 p.m.), Tenorio's article is 16th on the list of the Post's 20 most emailed articles, a feat that none of the other articles managed to achieve:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/mostemailed/index.html
Posted by: tri-village | May 12, 2008 6:09 PM
============
Now it's on the 14th. Jumped up two spots.

Posted by: td | May 12, 2008 8:34 PM | Report abuse

"Soccer on the front page of a major U.S. daily for the sixth consecutive day?"

Well, to me means canceling my 14 year subscription to the Baltimore Sun and start one with the Post (if available in Reisterstown...)

Posted by: Carlo - Reisterstown MD | May 12, 2008 8:37 PM | Report abuse

"who cares about high school soccer or thinks it should be the barometer - the best soccer is played at the club level."
==============================

I do. It's not about the best soccer, it's about the best kids, ultimately the best people. If you think soccer is a great sport, and that sport has a character-building and other purposes beyond deciding who are the best players, then you should care too. Soccer is just a vehicle, one among many, but a great one (IMO).

Posted by: Old WNT fan | May 12, 2008 8:58 PM | Report abuse

I thoroughly enjoyed the article and plan to share it with parents of my younger son's team (headed for top 10 emailed articles?)

My older son played a couple of seasons with Sean Murnane back in maybe 3rd or 4th grade when we used to live in Virginia. Sean was exceptional then. Glad to see he's still playing...and still exceptional.

Posted by: LD | May 12, 2008 9:19 PM | Report abuse

probably nobody reading this thread anymore... but anyhow, i see your point on the benefit of having an article on the nuances of the game on a major publication. also, i don't mean to slander highschool soccer - i enjoy it and enjoy reading about it as well. i guess i was just caught off guard how this article was getting so much love. anywho, moving on.

Posted by: hokie soccer fan | May 15, 2008 8:17 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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