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Swine Flu Impact Continues

CONCACAF has canceled the remainder of the Under-17 tournament in Tijuana and postponed the second leg of the Champions League finals because of swine flu concerns.

Costa Rica, Honduras, Mexico and the USA had already clinched berths in the U-17 World Cup in Nigeria this fall. The Champions League was to conclude this Wednesday in Cancun with Atlante holding a 2-0 edge on Cruz Azul. It will now be played May 12.

The full announcement is here.

Wise decision or overreaction?

By Steve Goff  |  April 27, 2009; 4:07 PM ET
Categories:  CONCACAF  
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Comments

Manbearpig holds the cure.

Posted by: sitruc | April 27, 2009 4:16 PM | Report abuse

This totally blows. I couldn't wait to see these semifinal rounds. Oh well its totally understandable and in such situations the health of people is more important and basic need. Next up WC and hopefully US and Mexico will cross paths!

Posted by: silentbat | April 27, 2009 4:18 PM | Report abuse

Ugly situation. There's no putting lipstick on that pig.

Posted by: joedoc1 | April 27, 2009 4:20 PM | Report abuse

When pigs fly....we will have Avian Swine Flu.

Posted by: fischy | April 27, 2009 4:22 PM | Report abuse

I think it is an overreaction...then I read that hundreds have died (tough for me to believe, from a flu!).

So, for now, definitely play it safe...although cases have already appeared in San Diego, so they might just end up transmitting it as they leave Tijuana.

Told you they shouldn't have played there ;)

Posted by: Reignking | April 27, 2009 4:31 PM | Report abuse

Probably the right thing to do, especially as far as the U-17s go. Few people would show up to the matches anyway.

Does Costco sell 5 gallon buckets of Purell?

Posted by: I-270Exit1 | April 27, 2009 4:37 PM | Report abuse

"then I read that hundreds have died (tough for me to believe, from a flu!)."

You don't know much about history, do you?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1918_flu_pandemic

"It is estimated that anywhere from 20 to 100 million people were killed worldwide."

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol12no01/05-0979.htm

CDC puts the number at 50 million deaths.

Posted by: fischy | April 27, 2009 4:38 PM | Report abuse

Marcus Hahneman and Reading take a step closer to a birth in the Premier League next season - won at Norwich 0-2. They could leap frog Sheffield United and Birmingham with a win next Sunday and a Blades loss or draw.

Posted by: Kev29 | April 27, 2009 4:41 PM | Report abuse

I don't know if this is an overreaction, or just being safe. This is certainly a very serious problem in Mexico.

What is an overreaction? The EU Health Minister telling Europeans to avoid non-essential travel to the US because of this. Really - cancel the family trip to Florida because 40 people in the country caught the virus while in Mexico?

Posted by: Kev29 | April 27, 2009 4:49 PM | Report abuse

The estimate of annual deaths from influenza in the US is ~36,000 and from 250-500K worldwide.

That's your everyday, garden variety flu, not the heretofore unseen Swine flu.

Posted by: I-270Exit1 | April 27, 2009 4:49 PM | Report abuse

When I think of the "flu", I don't think of some superbug capable of felling populations, but something that you have for 5 days.

Posted by: Reignking | April 27, 2009 4:55 PM | Report abuse

"something that you have for 5 days."

Yes -- if you're a healthy, young adult. That ordinary flu -- not a "superbug" -- kills thousands of Americans every year. See I-270's post. And, what made the 1918 pandemic so deadly was not the virulence of the bug, but the poverty and famine that followed WWI, and the way it was spread so easily by returning soldiers.

Posted by: fischy | April 27, 2009 5:04 PM | Report abuse

"something that you have for 5 days."

Yes -- if you're a healthy, young adult.
Posted by: fischy

Not this flu, apparently.

Posted by: Reignking | April 27, 2009 5:08 PM | Report abuse

Too bad they couldn't just move it a few miles up the road to San Diego.

Posted by: Eric_in_Baltimore | April 27, 2009 5:21 PM | Report abuse

Usually the only mentions of Flu on this board regard Brazilian futebol rivalries in Rio.

I can see them canceling the rest of the Mexican League's season over this.

We live in strange times.

Posted by: IamAM | April 27, 2009 5:33 PM | Report abuse

It wouldn't hurt to show some caution until more is known.

This reminds me of the whole China/SARS outbreak before the WOmen's WOrld Cup.

Posted by: addick | April 27, 2009 6:04 PM | Report abuse

The four teams already qualified, there really isn't a point. There isn't seeding in the u-17 WC, winning this tournament wouldn't make any difference, just two less competitive matches before they go is all.

Posted by: callmesanchezzz | April 27, 2009 6:33 PM | Report abuse

i-270: that 35k number is for the category "influenza and pneumonia" and includes almost entirely people over the age of 65 and those with suppressed immune systems. and most of it is pneumonia.

Posted by: joshuaostevens | April 27, 2009 6:38 PM | Report abuse

Not this flu, apparently.

Posted by: Reignking | April 27, 2009 5:08 PM

Exactly.

The difference between Swine and seasonal flu is what happened with the Spanish Flu. Basically, young, healthy people's immune systems ignored the virus until it reached critical mass, way past the point symptoms normally appear.

Once it reached that point, the immune system kicks into overdrive, starts going after the body, and the patient essentially drowns.

It only happens in people 20-40, who are otherwise healthy and that's why its a big deal. A brand-new, unknown in man bug that can spread anywhere.

Posted by: Josh8 | April 27, 2009 7:02 PM | Report abuse

Worldwide, the CDC estimates 7.6 million people die each year from coronary heart diease. The WHO estimates 7.9 million people die each year from cancer.

Meanwhile, we're talking about how 76 people have been infected with the Swine Flu.

Posted by: BelovedCartoonMouse | April 27, 2009 7:27 PM | Report abuse

Except cancer and heart disease aren't highly contagious and capable of affecting pretty much anyone.

Posted by: audreyy | April 27, 2009 8:39 PM | Report abuse

Is everyone a doctor here?

Posted by: Reignking | April 27, 2009 9:14 PM | Report abuse

Is everyone a doctor here?

Posted by: Reignking | April 27, 2009 9:14 PM

No, just a research microbiologist

Posted by: Josh8 | April 27, 2009 9:24 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: DadRyan | April 27, 2009 10:23 PM | Report abuse

Its better to take precaution for the safety of the fans and the sport. So let it be for now then when things clear up then resume as usual.

and im an entomologist. glad to see another scientist in the room.

Posted by: TheWashDipsSince88 | April 27, 2009 10:23 PM | Report abuse

The EU are being particularly hypocritical (meaning: more so than usual) on a travel advisory to the US, since they aren't saying anything about the cases found in France and Spain.

Given that the tournament had already reached the semifinal stage and all four teams had thus qualified for the World Cup, it made sense to cancel. Getting the World Cup ticket was the most important thing about this. Now, of course, they can worry about malaria, TB, botulism, and encephalitis in Nigeria. What happy topics for a sunny day!

Posted by: troy6 | April 28, 2009 3:20 AM | Report abuse

Josh8 in da house!

I think this is overreaction, although we will all be well-served by the increased international cooperation with regards to health monitoring. I think this appears to be another instance of identification of serious cases. They are probably millions of cases that resolved normally, and so 150 deaths seems about right...

Posted by: dfunkt | April 28, 2009 9:14 AM | Report abuse

@joshuaostevens: I count the secondary infections as they're part of the sequelae. If one does not count the secondary infections, then the death count form HIV is about 0.

Posted by: I-270Exit1 | April 28, 2009 9:54 AM | Report abuse

@joshuaostevens: I count the secondary infections as they're part of the sequelae. If one does not count the secondary infections, then the death count form HIV is about 0.

Posted by: I-270Exit1 | April 28, 2009 9:54 AM | Report abuse

As another Josh, I'll take this one.

Of course no one has died directly from the HIV virus or AIDS, it's not what the bug does. Secondary infections are a critical component that comes after the T cell count reaches a the 400 units/L or so threshold. Without these opportunistic infections, there would be no other cause of death for this disease and it would be viewed as a disorder.

H1N1 is a different beast as it it is fully capable of killing healthy, non immuno-comped adults. It doesn't need any other pathogens, while the seasonal strains are usually accompanied by such.

I think that's the difference that was trying be pointed out between this new strain and the seasonal ones.

Posted by: Josh8 | April 28, 2009 11:37 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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