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Could vuvuzelas fall silent? Ban possible

By Liz Clarke
Acknowledging a rising tide of complaints about the deafening din of vuvuzelas during World Cup matches, Danny Jordaan, chief executive of the tournament's local organizing committee, warned Sunday that the plastic horns could be banned if fans don't show more respect in their bugling.

In an interview with the BBC, Jordaan reiterated calls for fans not to blow vuvuzelas during the playing of a country's national anthem or during announcements over the soccer venues' public-address system. Asked if the horns could be banned, Jordaan said: "If there are grounds to do so, yes."

A ban on vuvuzelas was considered in the months leading up to the 2010 World Cup, but officials chose to allow them, with FIFA President Sepp Blatter arguing against efforts "to Europeanize" the first World Cup contested on African soil.

More.....

But even among South Africans opinion is split about the merits of the plastic horn, which has become the rage among soccer fans in the country in the past decade.

Vuvuzela supporters argue that the horn is a South African tradition, producing a unique sound that signifies pride in the nation's heritage and support for its national team, Bafana Bafana. Moreover, South Africa's goalkeeper Itumeleng Khune is urging fans to blow even louder during Bafana Bafana's upcoming match against Uruguay on Wednesday, saying that from players' perspectives, the noisier the vuvuelas, the better.

But a growing number of critics within the country argue that the vuvuzela has nothing to do with tradition and is simply an annoyance--one that, regrettably, has supplanted the genuine South African tradition of singing during soccer matches.

And several coaches and players are complaining that the noise interferes with matches.

Said Argentine soccer star Lionel Messi, following his country's 1-0 victory over Nigeria: "It is impossible to communicate. It's like being deaf."

By Liz Clarke  |  June 14, 2010; 6:02 AM ET
Categories:  2010 World Cup , South Africa  | Tags: 2010 World Cup, vuvuzelas  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: U.S. squad gets an unofficial theme song
Next: Monday's World Cup kickaround

Comments

Blame the ref. Blame the pitch. Blame the ball. Blame the fans. It's as if they want to be like prima-donna golf and tennis players, demanding total silence. If Messi had finished his three chances, he wouldn't be complaining. Just shut up and play the game.

Posted by: I-270Exit1 | June 14, 2010 7:15 AM | Report abuse

I hope they ban the mindless Vuvuzela horn. I hate it and it has killed all the atmosphere of the World Cup. I grew up in Europe and am a life long football [soccer] fan.

When I switched on the TV the first morning and heard the buzz I thought it was some interference on the TV and hoped they would fix the sound. Not a chance. I had to resort to the mute button - might as well, I couldn't hear the commentators anyway.

Three days later and it is so awful trying to enjoy the games - it takes away the crowd. Crowd participation is totally lost in this deafening stupid, vapid, inane buzz sound. Claiming that it is "tradition" is nonsense. The vuvuzela is a recent invention and a bad one at that.

BRING BACK THE CROWD NOISE - SINGING AND CHANTING.

Posted by: dub13 | June 14, 2010 7:30 AM | Report abuse

Ban the Vuvuzelas, they are draining any kind of atmosphere in the matches. Limit the ban to RSA games, but enough is enough. It's an annoying, monotone sound that drowns out any kind support from any nation.

Blatter is an idiot too. "Europeanize?" What does that mean? Is he saying that chanting, singing, drumming and just general cheering and jeering is European thing only?

Posted by: RedDevil1 | June 14, 2010 7:31 AM | Report abuse

Anyone see Biden's granddaughter covering her ears in pain?

We already know that those horns keep star reporters from sleeping, but you can hardly ban them from the city.

Hoping to catch at least a half of this match this morning. Should be a good one.

Posted by: Reignking | June 14, 2010 7:31 AM | Report abuse

Part of holding the Cup in Africa is to experience a different atmosphere. I hope they don't ban the vuvuzelas, even though it does make it harder to hear the announcers. Let's try not to make everything always the same.

Posted by: Dougmacintyre | June 14, 2010 7:33 AM | Report abuse

Was it Denmark that was chosen to have the #1 soccer fans (Soccermania)?

Posted by: Reignking | June 14, 2010 7:35 AM | Report abuse

I certainly hope they ban them, but I don't think they will - there would probably be riots if they tried to do so at this juncture. And anyone who saw the Confed Cup last year could have seen this annoyance coming.

Posted by: nairbsod | June 14, 2010 7:41 AM | Report abuse

At least they won't be imported. Plastic horns are banned at RFK under the rule that "whistles or air horns of any kind" are not to be brought into the stadium.

Posted by: seahawkdad | June 14, 2010 7:41 AM | Report abuse

I love the fact that this Cup is being played in South Africa - it's groundbreaking, interesting and exciting. That said, the vuvuzelas are really awful. I largely tune them out while watching, but now there is no other atmosphere. US-England, Holland-Denmark - both matches should have provided us with a lot of singing and crowd noise. Shame it's just been a swarm of bees again.

Posted by: Kev29 | June 14, 2010 7:46 AM | Report abuse

The World Cup sound provided by THX.

Posted by: RedDevil1 | June 14, 2010 7:47 AM | Report abuse

This debate is getting funnier. Some of my mates are so furious that they are cheekily venting their anger on the iPhone app Vuvuzaga.

Posted by: edviv123 | June 14, 2010 7:53 AM | Report abuse

er Soccernomics. It's early for me.

Posted by: Reignking | June 14, 2010 7:53 AM | Report abuse

De Jong has had a high boot and a two-footed tackle so far. How is this thug still on the field?

Posted by: I-270Exit1 | June 14, 2010 8:01 AM | Report abuse

De Jong does make it awfully hard to stay unbiased in a match like this. Dude, is a punk.

Posted by: DadRyan | June 14, 2010 8:09 AM | Report abuse

I love the vuvuzela's. I don't even hear them during the game anymore and frankly I would miss them I think. Wonder if they are banned at DC United matches :)

Posted by: strago | June 14, 2010 8:09 AM | Report abuse

Germany didn't seem to be negatively affected by the vuvuzelas. Messi should just admit that the Nigerian keeper was up to the task and not blame others. First it was the ball and now it's the vuvus. What's next: the grass?

Posted by: tundey | June 14, 2010 8:11 AM | Report abuse

Nowhere did Messi say that Nigeria wasn't good.

Posted by: Reignking | June 14, 2010 8:12 AM | Report abuse

Hate the vuvuzelas but they're growing on me since it's the French and Argentines whining.

Posted by: benonthehill | June 14, 2010 8:13 AM | Report abuse

De Jong finally De Booked.

Posted by: Reignking | June 14, 2010 8:14 AM | Report abuse

Actually, the problem with Messi is that he was shouting for Xavi and Iniesta only to find Veron and Gutierrez.

Posted by: RedDevil1 | June 14, 2010 8:15 AM | Report abuse

I got early for that?

Posted by: Reignking | June 14, 2010 8:15 AM | Report abuse

What's next: the grass?
Posted by: tundey
=============

Don't mention "grass" around DadRyan.

Posted by: I-270Exit1 | June 14, 2010 8:19 AM | Report abuse

Local vibe is great and each world cup should have a different feel, but really, blasting these "instruments" so loudly that we can't hear the supporters' chants is just rude to the people visiting South Africa and trying to support their country. Think of all the great chants we are missing out on. Including South African chants I would love to hear. Oh well.

Posted by: smt123 | June 14, 2010 8:40 AM | Report abuse

Local vibe is great and each world cup should have a different feel, but really, blasting these "instruments" so loudly that we can't hear the supporters' chants is just rude to the people visiting South Africa and trying to support their country. Think of all the great chants we are missing out on. Including South African chants I would love to hear. Oh well.

Posted by: smt123 | June 14, 2010 8:42 AM | Report abuse

to me it makes the whole thing sound like the opera the Palpatine & Anakin attend. Straight up Evol.

Posted by: DikShuttle | June 14, 2010 8:43 AM | Report abuse

Would there be any goals in this Cup without all this rec-league bungling?

Posted by: Godfather_of_Goals | June 14, 2010 8:49 AM | Report abuse

I'm upset that the camera never found VdV's wife.

Posted by: Reignking | June 14, 2010 8:52 AM | Report abuse

Watched the first half, back to the office for the second and missed the goal by a matter of seconds. Oh well, at least I have the comically atrocious ESPN radio commentary (Glenn Davis and Kyle Martino) to kind-of let me know what's happening.

Posted by: Kev29 | June 14, 2010 8:53 AM | Report abuse

I am not so sure that a vuvuzela qualifies as a tradition, but even if it does, we need to recognize that the constant drone overrides all other crowd sounds and detracts from the atmosphere of the WC to a major extent. Wait till Brazil plays and there will be no noise from the samba drums. What about singing? Imagine if vuvuzelas blocked out "You Will Never Walk Alone" at Liverpool. The football has been mostly bland so far, perhaps the meaningful crowd participation is the reason.

Posted by: snowmanvt | June 14, 2010 8:55 AM | Report abuse

I really liked all the percussion instruments you could hear in the last ACN tournament. I don't mind the horns that much but I'd take the singing and drumming any day over the swarm we hear now.

Posted by: DadRyan | June 14, 2010 9:11 AM | Report abuse

Ball watching inside your own 6. Lovely.

Posted by: Godfather_of_Goals | June 14, 2010 9:11 AM | Report abuse

geeze. Look away for one second to read the SJKing blog...

Goalie actually did well... stoopid defenders couldn't jump on it.

Posted by: DikShuttle | June 14, 2010 9:11 AM | Report abuse

We have a "tradition" here in the States too, which is to play songs like "Welcome to The Jungle" at ear-splitting levels at sporting events. How would you enjoy a World Cup match played to the constant sound of the "Manuel Noriega Siege Sound Track" at ear-splitting levels?

"Europeanize" -- what a load of politically correct crap -- and from the same idiot who suggested the women play in miniskirts . . .

Posted by: OWNTF | June 14, 2010 9:18 AM | Report abuse

Double Dutch

Posted by: Reignking | June 14, 2010 9:20 AM | Report abuse

Wake and Bake.

Posted by: DadRyan | June 14, 2010 9:22 AM | Report abuse

Wait, did I pick another game right?

Oh, yes I did. That's another 3 pts, and me on 19...

Posted by: JkR- | June 14, 2010 9:23 AM | Report abuse

Yes, a bunch of white Americans and Europeans telling S. Africans how much noise they can make at a soccer match and what kind of noise it should be. Surely just the message we wanted to send after giving the first world cup to an African nation...

Hate to admit it but Sepp is very right on this one. If all of that stuff we say about being culturally diverse and tolerant is true, then we just need to deal with the Vuvuzela.

Posted by: rademaar | June 14, 2010 9:23 AM | Report abuse

I think the argument that the vuvuzelas are an important part of the South African culture is a valid one. That being said, I've recently come to find their culture to be loud, vulgar, and utterly offensive--and this is coming from an American. Europeanize, Americanize, Asianize, Australianize, Latin Americanize--whatever it takes to silence those idiots and their silly little plastic horns.

Posted by: pgrestifo | June 14, 2010 9:24 AM | Report abuse

ESPN better realize that it is losing millions in lost revenue because people are tuning out because of the constant noise coming through the speaker.

We usually keep a TV at work turned to CNN or such, but the boss ok'd it last week to tune to the world cup. Well, the boss heard the noise and has now ordered it back to news channels. There go 25 people in each of 4 sites across the US.

Posted by: sblank69 | June 14, 2010 9:25 AM | Report abuse

NO BAN.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2010/soccer/world-cup-2010/06/14/vuvuzelas/index.html

"JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) -- Vuvuzelas will not be banned from the World Cup despite the fearsome din the plastic trumpets make, organisers said on Monday."

Posted by: nairbsod | June 14, 2010 9:25 AM | Report abuse

Ban them till after the games are over. Yes, this is not a soccer atmosphere. If people were allowed to bring sirens into the game that reached 100 decibels, would that then be allowed? This is nonsense. With this type of atmosphere, don't expect great sympathy for an African World Cup again.

Posted by: Refreshing29 | June 14, 2010 9:27 AM | Report abuse

This from Snowman:

am not so sure that a vuvuzela qualifies as a tradition

Right you are.

If it's a "tradition," it's a "tradition" that supplants an older and more meaningful tradition of singing at matches, which in South Africa, I am told, was especially meaningful during the apartheid era.

There's some load of crap on Wikipedia about how the vuvuzela is the direct descendent of modified metal bicycle horms that were banned from stadiums for their possible use as weapons, and how the pioneer of the metal horn found a manufacturer to make a plastic version circa 2001.

That utterly disregards the fact that vendors at soccer games in Latin America and the US were hawking an identical, Chinese-made plastic horn as early as 1999. These were sold at MLS games in the early 00's, largely to hyperactive children, but many MLS teams banned them because of the deleterious affect the horns had on the game atmosphere.

So I call BS on this phony attempt to generate a tradition out of less than a decade of the concession stand sale of a mass-produced piece of Chinese garbage.

And this from Liz:

signifies ... support for its national team, Bafana Bafana

How about this: South Africa supporters should blow their horns at the 3 to 7 games that Bafana Bafana will play, and leave the horns at home for the other 57 to 61 games?

Posted by: Mastodon_Juan | June 14, 2010 9:35 AM | Report abuse

So, from the comments above, horns are annoying, but drums are not and neither is Rodgers and Hammerstein. Hypocrites.

Posted by: I-270Exit1 | June 14, 2010 9:40 AM | Report abuse

They've been around much longer. I remember seeing them and hearing them in 1996 in just about every MLS match.

Posted by: RedDevil1 | June 14, 2010 9:41 AM | Report abuse

BRWAAAAAAAAAAHYes, a bunBRWAAAAAAAAAAHans and Europeans telling S. Africans how much noise theyBRWAAAAAAAAAAHa soccer matcBRWAAAAAAAAAAHe it shouBRWAAAAAAAAAAHt the message we wanted to send aftBRWAAAAAAAAAAH the first world cup to an African natioBRWAAAAAAAAAAH

Hate to admiBRWAAAAAAAAAAH is very right on this oneBRWAAAAAAAAAAHat stuff we say about being culturally diverse and tolerant is truBRWAAAAAAAAAAHjust need to deal with the VuBRWAAAAAAAAAAH

Sorry, Rademaar, I was blowing a vuvuzela and didn't hear you. Were you saying something? Are you asking if I don't give a damn about what you were saying?

Posted by: Mastodon_Juan | June 14, 2010 9:43 AM | Report abuse

Even this spammer jerk is less annoying than vuvezelas-- he lets you get a word in edgewise.

Posted by: Mastodon_Juan | June 14, 2010 9:53 AM | Report abuse

Oh, yes I did. That's another 3 pts, and me on 19...
Posted by: JkR-
==========

You're doping. I demand a drug test.

Posted by: I-270Exit1 | June 14, 2010 9:54 AM | Report abuse

I'll take any drug you want to test me for...


wait...

Posted by: JkR- | June 14, 2010 10:06 AM | Report abuse

The latest reports say that the vuvuzelas will not be banned unless people use them as weapons, throw them on the field, etc. Apparently Jordaan meant that they could be banned if necessary for safety reasons. The fact that the soccer snobs are crying about them is not sufficient reason for a ban. The vuvuzelas are no more annoying than the drums the Latin Americans play or the songs the Europeans sing, both of which compete with the commentary on the TV. (Plus you can't understand 95% of the songs anyway unless you're there in person.)

Sepp Blatter pointed out this morning that the people who are complaining about the vuvuzelas would all complain if THEIR ways of showing support were banned. He's right. The complainers are a bunch of hypocrites.

Posted by: 1995hoo | June 14, 2010 10:13 AM | Report abuse

Those horns have been sold at U.S. soccer games since the 1970's, and still are today. And they are not banned here, nor are they "air horns"; air horns are loaded with compressed air.

And how dumb do you have to be to blame ESPN for the noise? Guess what: microphones pick up sound. There are microphones in the broadcast booth. There are microphones at field level. The noise from the horns reaches these places.

The fact that ESPN is picking up any sound from the field at all tells me they are doing an excellent job.

Posted by: Godfather_of_Goals | June 14, 2010 10:22 AM | Report abuse

If the broadcasters really have such an issue, why aren't they using noise-cancelling microphones? Such things exist and are pretty common--Howard Dean, for example, was using one when he let loose with his famous scream. (Apparently the room where he was speaking was very loud, but you didn't hear the background noise on TV due to the special microphone.) Seems like it wouldn't be at all difficult for ESPN, or any other broadcaster, to use that sort of thing.

Posted by: 1995hoo | June 14, 2010 10:25 AM | Report abuse

ESPN is broadcasting the game in 3d -- I'm sure they could've developed something to filter out the noise in one year.

Posted by: Reignking | June 14, 2010 10:25 AM | Report abuse

Tried watching several times, turned off the TV in rapid order each time.

Though drumming, singing, cheering and chanting can interfere with listening to commentary, I have yet to feel that any of those will drive me to the edge of madness.

Posted by: nmik | June 14, 2010 10:28 AM | Report abuse

I hate them. I'm not a big soccer fan, but I do get excited about the World Cup. This year, to watch the World Cup is to listen to horns. Or else watch with sound off on TV.

It's crazy! As a contrast, I remember the game-winning home run hit by an LA Dodger, Kurt Gibson, in a post-season game some years ago. I'm no Dodger fan, but that was one dramatic home run. What was also amazing was that the home-town crowd was still cheering and clapping at full volume many minutes later. I always appreciate when the broadcasters go quiet and let the crowd noise dominate the broadcast after some dramatic play.

Do fans at soccer matches cheer and clap? You wouldn't know from watching this year's World Cup.

Posted by: michaelmelius | June 14, 2010 10:46 AM | Report abuse

I tried to endure the mind-numbing racket during the US-England match. Ended up turning off the sound. Exactly what a plastic, made-in-China tube has to do with S. African culture mystifies me but if they require it to support their team then blow it only during their games!
My sympathies to anyone who bought a ticket to any of the stadiums.

Posted by: Davidd1 | June 14, 2010 10:52 AM | Report abuse

Please ban Vuvuzela. It's annoying and disrespectful.

Posted by: trumeau | June 14, 2010 10:58 AM | Report abuse

Sorry, Rademaar, I was blowing a vuvuzela and didn't hear you. Were you saying something? Are you asking if I don't give a damn about what you were saying?

Posted by: Mastodon_Juan | June 14, 2010 9:43 AM

This is the World Cup spirit written large right here... Perhaps Mastodon doesn't give a damn about this??
http://www.jacobklamer.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/apartheid-sign-on-durban-beach.jpg

Posted by: rademaar | June 14, 2010 10:59 AM | Report abuse

BAN THEM PLEASE

Posted by: smoke26 | June 14, 2010 11:01 AM | Report abuse

We get the CBC feed here in Vermont on comcast. The CBC has turned down the crowd noise to a great degree to eliminate the buzz of the vuvuzela. Unfortunately, only ESPN is in HD. I chose to watch the CBC so I can enjoy the announcers and the game--but the atmosphere is gone. Yes, it may be ethnocentric to complain about annoying (to western ears) drone, but I cant help but wonder about he fans in the stadiums who dont want the constant buzz.

Posted by: snowmanvt | June 14, 2010 11:02 AM | Report abuse

Make it so!

Posted by: LloydHeilbrunn | June 14, 2010 11:10 AM | Report abuse

Those vuvuzelas sound like a thousand swarms of bees following their queens! They are beyond annoying and players should have the ability to communicate with each other. For heaven's sake, when will the purity of the game be the focus, and not the mindless fans with their little horns?! (and that was a pun!)

Posted by: denisestro | June 14, 2010 11:17 AM | Report abuse

Those vuvuzelas sound like a thousand swarms of bees following their queens! They are beyond annoying and players should have the ability to communicate with each other. For heaven's sake, when will the purity of the game be the focus, and not the mindless fans with their little horns?! (and that was a pun!)

Posted by: denisestro | June 14, 2010 11:18 AM | Report abuse

Can't help but think maybe the drone of vuvuzelas wouldn't have extended to the drone of this debate, except that the football just has not been that stellar to this point! (i.e., Danes vs. Netherlandzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz, Japan vs. Cameroonianzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz...)

Posted by: JefComment | June 14, 2010 11:23 AM | Report abuse

This is the World Cup spirit written large right here... Perhaps Mastodon doesn't give a damn about this??
http://www.jacobklamer.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/apartheid-sign-on-durban-beach.jpg

Rademaar, please explain what the incessant din of thousands of vuvuzelas at a soccer match has to do with recognition of the history of apartheid. Really, please do. Because what you wrote is inarticulate.

Posted by: Mastodon_Juan | June 14, 2010 11:35 AM | Report abuse

An incredibly attractive part of the World Cup is the different fans, their songs, chants, and, of course, their cheers when their team scores! It's not "European"; it is world wide.

Those who prefer people blowing these stupid horns to create a loud irritating monotone just don't get it. Sporting events as important as the World Cup should not be sabotaged by taking away the ability of the players to communicate while they are playing - it affects the performance of the players and really impairs the ability of quality play.

Do you really think a team should win a match because the better team's players could not hear each other?

Posted by: cibor | June 14, 2010 11:40 AM | Report abuse

Do fans at soccer matches cheer and clap? You wouldn't know from watching this year's World Cup.

Posted by: michaelmelius | June 14, 2010 10:46 AM
---------------------------

Unfortunately for anyone who spent the money to fly to South Africa, get a hotel room, pay for the ticket, and take a taxi to the stadium, they have only two choices: cover their ears or suffer hearing damage.

What is there to clap and cheer about when the noise level is so high, you can't enjoy being there?

This is a shame for South Africa. Their first World Cup in Africa, and nobody can enjoy the sounds and celebrations. Lesson learned.

Posted by: cibor | June 14, 2010 11:48 AM | Report abuse

As bad aws the vuvuzelas are, and they are bad, I'd rather watch a match with vuvuzelas blaring than watch a soccer match being played on gridiron lines.

THAT makes a soccer game unwatchable.

Posted by: Ron16 | June 14, 2010 11:49 AM | Report abuse

"An incredibly attractive part of the World Cup is the different fans, their songs, chants, and, of course, their cheers when their team scores! It's not "European"; it is world wide."

Really, could you tell us at previous World Cups which fans you found greatly enhanced the World Cup. I remember at the last World Cup everyone got excited about the Germans waving flags and getting all patriotic. I don't know what the French or Italian fans were doing during the final and I really don't care what they were doing. I don't remember them singing any songs in particular. Maybe you can refresh our memory.

When the USA plays I just hear occasional U-S-A chants and I heard those on Saturday. During the Mexico-RSA match I heard the Mexican fans.

Posted by: csd1 | June 14, 2010 11:53 AM | Report abuse

"it may be ethnocentric to complain about annoying (to western ears)"

Western ears? The Japanese FA wants them banned: http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?art_id=nw20091117080504542C929729

The argument that thinking an undifferentiated ear-splitting din represents imperialism or white privilege or some such is tripe.

MLS teams sold identical plastic horns a decade ago, and the buyers were typically parents of kids. Fewer than a dozen kids blowing on the plastic horns continually would drown out hundreds of supporters, because those things are just loud.

Worse, the kids would blare on their horns in response to the rhythm of songs that supporters would sing, so they would listen to the drums then blow when an entire supporters section would chant. What was human speech was drowned out by undifferentiated noise.

Horns were absolutely toxic to organized chanting, to the playing of music on melodic instruments in the crowd. They could, and did, drown out announcements on the PA system and communications by players on the field.

This goes on in the NFL, for example, when notably large, loud crowds can disrupt a football offense before the snap. But the effort that creating a deafening roar is the effort of the concerted voices of people. Blowing on a horn, on the other hand, takes minimal effort or intent, just a normal amount of lung capacity.

Highlighting the effect plastic horns had on MLS matches made banning the sale of horns an easy decision for MLS teams. Whether South Africans or North Americans are blaring on a horn, the effect is to create literally inarticulate noise that forces any other voices to fall silent. I reject the idea that there is a qualitative distinction between horns blown by South Africans and horns blown by North Americans. I also reject the inference that criticizing the din of the horns has any moral equivalency to supporting colonialism or apartheid.

An understanding based on mutual respect and the willingness to hear each other's voices is the basis for a humane society. The vuvuzela's constant drone is the opposite of that.

Posted by: Mastodon_Juan | June 14, 2010 11:55 AM | Report abuse

If you really want to hear fan noise from different teams fans you might want to tell FIFA to make more tickets available to actual fans from those countries instead of giving them to sponsors and selling to them tour companies from all over the World.

Posted by: csd1 | June 14, 2010 11:57 AM | Report abuse

Plastic horns are now "tradition?!" When were they invented--15 years ago?! PLEASE they are an annoyance if not outright harmful. 130 dicabels is a jet plane takeoff at 100 feet....

Posted by: lovinliberty | June 14, 2010 12:02 PM | Report abuse

"Really, could you tell us at previous World Cups which fans you found greatly enhanced the World Cup. I remember at the last World Cup everyone got excited about the Germans waving flags and getting all patriotic"

The Korean fans in 2002 were fantastic.

Hearing La Marselleise sung spontaneously late in the 1998 final still gives me goosebumps.

I don't know if you have ever seen the 1966 World Cup film, but the stadiums were packed, even for obscure teams with no visiting supporters. But the English fans were truly gracious neutrals, clapping and cheering both sides for their play, giving North Korea an ovation for their shock win.

Posted by: Mastodon_Juan | June 14, 2010 12:02 PM | Report abuse

@CSD

The fans are there, you just can't hear them over the sound of BZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ.

Posted by: RedDevil1 | June 14, 2010 12:09 PM | Report abuse

"Really, could you tell us at previous World Cups which fans you found greatly enhanced the World Cup." -- Posted by: csd1

I'm American, so I don't watch the game as frequently as citizens of other countries.

When I watch the World Cup, I hear fans singing songs together - on both sides! There are chants, and not just the "U - S - A" yells. There are the combination of chants and clapping. The television shows fans decked out in their colors singing songs and smiling broadly when their team scores. Their happiness is both vocal and visual.

As for which previous World Cups when I've seen this, I've watched every game played in every World Cup going back to 1982 when Germany's goalkeeper, Toni Schumacher, came out of goal and used his foot to smash into the mouth of French defender Patrick Battiston. You can say I'm passionate about the World Cup, and I bought my first Sony Betamax VCR to record the World Cup games in '82! Today I record them on my DVR.

Now I can't hear what the announces are saying, so I'm turning the sound off and using Closed Captioning. That's the way it should be?

I don't think so.

Posted by: cibor | June 14, 2010 12:18 PM | Report abuse

I cannot abide those buzzy honking horns. Sounds like a million ducks in labor. If you can't organize them into a marching band for halftime, then I'm switching to a nice quiet baseball game.

Posted by: disposall | June 14, 2010 12:21 PM | Report abuse

its noise. just turn the volume down, and enjoy the HD. its not like the commentators are ever helpful anyway. ive seen no less than 7 yellow cards so far in which not even a speculative attempt at the justification was provided by the commentators. oh, and there was the announcing gaffe in the first game in which Tyler and Efram(?) were convinced Mexico had been robbed of a goal, and offered no apology as to why they were clearly wrong.

Posted by: VTUnited | June 14, 2010 12:54 PM | Report abuse

@VTUnited: only Efram didn't understand the call in the Mecico match. Yes, he was ridiculous-- clearly the goalkeeper rushed out.

Martin Tyler did not make a comment questioning the call. He described it without editorializing.

It's unfair and wrong to state that he shared Efram's incorrect opinion,

Posted by: Mastodon_Juan | June 14, 2010 1:53 PM | Report abuse

Paraguay just scored a shocking goal against Italy... you could not hear any cheering from their fans. Even when showed a close-up on TV. Just the blaring of those damn horns.

Posted by: snowmanvt | June 14, 2010 3:37 PM | Report abuse

Banning vuvuzelas. Great idea. Because South Africans usually take so well to being told what they can-or-cannot have...

http://www.entertainmedaily.com/2010/06/vuvuzela-let-south-africa-blow/

LET SOUTH AFRICA BLOW, AND LET THEM BLOW HARD!

What do you guys think??

Posted by: shlomitandroypethostel | June 14, 2010 3:54 PM | Report abuse

Like many sports fans in the US, my soccer viewing is limited to the World Cup games. Every 4 years I watch the games and think that maybe something will happen that will cause me to increase my patronage of this sport. The games in S. Africa have caused my enthusiasm for this sport to drop to an all time low. After reading the numerous posts I am convinced that soccer will never be more than a sports side note in the US. It's impossible to enjoy something while the low hum of those horns drone on and on and on. I'd rather hear nails going against a chalk board. By turning off the audio portion of the telecast I miss out on the analysis that I really need. Like it or not cheap plastic horns are doing more than just ruining the games for many of us, it's turning us off of soccer once and for all. They are obnoxious. Can't wait for NFL season to start!

Posted by: lleathers | June 14, 2010 4:20 PM | Report abuse

They sound like the punks in the parking lot revving up their rice burners with the beefart mufflers.

Posted by: laboo | June 14, 2010 10:20 PM | Report abuse

This is the World Cup spirit written large right here... Perhaps Mastodon doesn't give a damn about this??
http://www.jacobklamer.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/apartheid-sign-on-durban-beach.jpg

If I had a beach, I would ban rademaar the tolerance nazi. And no, I'm not a pro-genocide anti-antisemite, in case you were confused by the reference.

Posted by: pgrestifo | June 15, 2010 12:25 AM | Report abuse

Wait that came out wrong... ignore the second anti. Oh, and pretend the first bit is in quotes... or italics. Sorry, I'm new.

Posted by: pgrestifo | June 15, 2010 12:29 AM | Report abuse

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