Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
On Twitter: SoccerInsider and PostSports  |  Facebook  |  Sports e-mail alerts  |  RSS

North Korea shows live TV coverage of 7-0 loss

UPDATED 3:52 P.M. WITH VIDEO

North Korean state TV, which doesn't usually show live World Cup matches, provided coverage of today's game against Portugal.

Oops.

When the game ended, the studio announcer stated: "The Portuguese won the game and now have four points. We are ending our live broadcast now."


By Steve Goff  |  June 21, 2010; 1:41 PM ET
Categories:  2010 World Cup  | Tags: North Korea, World Cup  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Chile vs. Switzerland in World Cup 2010
Next: Spain vs. Honduras in World Cup 2010

Comments

Yes, Portugal won and got 4 fours after turning it up to 11 on the field.... :)

Posted by: 22206no1 | June 21, 2010 2:18 PM | Report abuse

What if any assurances did FIFA obtain from the North Korean government that there would be no retribution against their players and/or their players' families should they not perform to a standard that pleased the "Dear Leader"?

I'm guessing none and on that basis alone North Korea should never have been allowed to play in the World Cup. It's not enjoyable watching an international soccer game when you realize there is a very strong likelihood that the players and their families on one side are at serious risk of being severely punished by their government because they are getting beaten by a superior side.

A journalist should raise this matter with FIFA at the next press conference.

Posted by: xavier6 | June 21, 2010 2:25 PM | Report abuse

When the game ended, the studio announcer stated: "The Portuguese won the game and now have four points. We are ending our live broadcast now."

That is how the media should report things. Straight, fair, and balanced. None of that liberal bias from the MSM......!

Posted by: grubbsbl | June 21, 2010 2:26 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, their final match against Cote D'Ivoire is either going to go really well or really poorly for them.

I'd be curious to see if any of the players try to defect after the game.

Posted by: IamAM | June 21, 2010 2:34 PM | Report abuse

"North Korea should never have been allowed to play in the World Cup."


That's a slippery slope, and it would be foolish to go there.

Who would be the next country excluded, and why?

FIFA runs the WC, and as long as the football associations are in good standing, they will be eligible. The longer FIFA sticks to that, the better.

Kicking countries out because you don't like their politics would turn the *World* Cup into something short of that.

And I'm sure your concern for the Korean players is well-intentioned. But North Korea has played international football for a long time. I don't know of any actual reports of the players or their families being mistreated, do you? Certainly something like that would jeopardize their standing, or any other country's, of their FA.

Posted by: Godfather_of_Goals | June 21, 2010 2:34 PM | Report abuse

Alec Baldwin is canceling his vacation to Lisbon in protest.

Posted by: Rand-al-Thor | June 21, 2010 2:36 PM | Report abuse

I think the N. Korean involvement in the WC has been a wonderful thing for all concerned. From the standpoint of fooballing quality, there are about 20 other teams that one could put into Group G in their place that would also go 0-3-0 (can anyone say "France?"). And they did a lot better against Brazil than the Ivory Coast did. From a cultural point of view, it is great to see N. Koreans as three dimensional people, proud of their culture and their country. And, hopefully, N. Koreans come away seeing the rest of us in a less paranoid light. One can only hope.

Posted by: glfrazier | June 21, 2010 2:53 PM | Report abuse

That's a slippery slope, and it would be foolish to go there.

Who would be the next country excluded, and why?

Posted by: Godfather_of_Goals | June 21, 2010 2:34 PM

If a nation is deemed to be in constant violation of international human rights standards (whatever they may be), then FIFA should consider banning them from play. There is certainly precedence, like South Africa in the apartheid era, for bans related to non-football matters. Certainly that was a proper decision, correct?

I don't know if the North Korean regime's treatment of their people is worthy of a FIFA ban, but it's not a possibility that should be automatically discounted.

Posted by: Kev29 | June 21, 2010 2:55 PM | Report abuse

In Response to Godfather of goals: Your slippery slope argument would reasonable if N. Korea was like most countries. However, this is the MOST REPRESIVE in the history of the world. You ask about proof that the players will be harmed. Try reading “The Aquariums of Pyongyang” or viewing the documentary “Inside N. Korea”. You will realize that it is not only the players who are in grave danger, but also their children and their parents. Punishing 3 generations is the “Dear Leaders” standard practice. They all face inturnment in horrific concentration camps or execution! No joke! No theory! This is the reality and they must all be terrified! There are not a lot of reports available, because outside reporters are not allowed in, and N. Koreans are rarely allowed out. If someone does escape the remaining family members (all 3 generations) are in for it. Do the research and you will realize how bad it is.

Posted by: ElRoberto | June 21, 2010 3:01 PM | Report abuse

However, this is the MOST REPRESIVE [regime] in the history of the world.
============

I'm tempted to invoke the Godwin's law, but the thread isn't long enough.

Posted by: I-270Exit1 | June 21, 2010 4:36 PM | Report abuse

All I have to say is oops

Posted by: njndirish | June 21, 2010 5:49 PM | Report abuse

FIFA banned South Africa from international competition when the apartheid government killed a bunch of it's own citizens in Soweto.

Posted by: xavier6 | June 21, 2010 9:47 PM | Report abuse

And yet FIFA does not ban Cote d'Ivoire, where reportedly a shocking percentage of the country's young females routinely are mutilated.

Probably best that FIFA does not get into the business of judging countries' relative human rights records. They haven't even mastered soccer yet . . . .

Posted by: OWNTF | June 21, 2010 10:32 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company