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Tuesday World Cup kickaround

FIFA boss Sepp Blatter says he is sorry for officiating gaffes and promises to reopen discussion about goal line technology.

Clearly, today's column by my man Grahame Jones in Los Angeles Times turned the tide.

Says veteran coach Guus Hiddink: Blatter "should announce tomorrow that video replay will be implemented, or he needs to resign."

Post columnist Tracee Hamilton makes a case for replay.

My match report from Brazil's victory over Chile.

I am heading to Pretoria to see Keisuke Honda and Japan's Blue Samurai play Paraguay (10 a.m. ET, ESPN, Univision, ESPN Deportes, ESPN3.com) in the first of two World Cup round-of-16 matches today. Colleague Liz Clarke is en route to Cape Town for Spain-Portugal (2:30 p.m., ESPN, Univision, ESPN Deportes, ESPN3.com).

Most of the American players are arriving back in the States today. Landon Donovan is scheduled to make the talk show rounds in New York (Jon Stewart? David Letterman?) before rejoining the Los Angeles Galaxy, which hosts the Seattle Sounders on Sunday.

The full story on the U.S. situation and AP's video package:

By Steve Goff  |  June 29, 2010; 5:18 AM ET
Categories:  2010 World Cup , Brazil , U.S. men's national team  | Tags: World Cup  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Brazil vs. Chile: Brazil advances
Next: Paraguay vs. Japan in World Cup 2010

Comments

Ooh ooh! If I vote resign, will the next guy have to implement it right away? I'd like to vote for that option

Posted by: JacobfromAtlanta-ish | June 29, 2010 6:24 AM | Report abuse

FIFA only will implement replay and goal line technology when Blatter, et al. can get a cut from its deployment.

Posted by: griffin1108 | June 29, 2010 7:19 AM | Report abuse

sounds like Liz won the coin toss.

Posted by: troy6 | June 29, 2010 7:23 AM | Report abuse

Worse than the officiating is having ESPN commentator Ally McBeal back jabbering incomprehensibly in Scots brogue.

Last week I cheered when he seemed to be loosing his voice, but moaned yesterday when he returned.

Posted by: Bartolo1 | June 29, 2010 7:44 AM | Report abuse

The Crew to announce the release of Colombian F Sergio Herrera on Tuesday. Team's top offseason signing played one #MLS minute.

Posted by: Reignking | June 29, 2010 8:05 AM | Report abuse

Gulati, I think he has done an amicable job, but change is needed. Either he signs up Klinsmann as a top adviser, or he steps down as the head of the USSF, I feel change is needed. On one hand our results in South Africa may be just good enough for some, on the other if this were a serious footballing country it is BLARINGLY obvious we need a new system and direction from top to bottom, we did not succeed. The USSF has the money to make the United States a TOP contender, it is about time we acted like it and do things accordingly.

Posted by: elfelixg | June 29, 2010 8:12 AM | Report abuse

Goff def picked the shorter straw

Posted by: Gooner | June 29, 2010 8:14 AM | Report abuse

LD Love child, never meant to be?

Posted by: Reignking | June 29, 2010 8:17 AM | Report abuse


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Posted by: candy-seasky | June 29, 2010 8:33 AM | Report abuse

It's easy to dislike Blatter, but he's got a point that instant replay -- in instances where the ball remains in play following the disputed incident -- would ruin futball's flowing nature, which separates it from most other sports.

An extreme scenario: instant replay exists. There is a disputed play just before the fast-break sequence that leads to Donovan's goal against Algeria. As Altidore crosses the ball, the ref decides that the disputed play should be reviewed and whistles USA attack to a halt before the goal. Does anybody really want something like this to occur?

Replay is one thing, goal line technology or additional endline officials are another. The latter would not affect the flow of play. Goal judges in hockey should be futball's model. Electronic or human, a goal judge would immediately signal when the ball crosses the line. No signal, no goal. Play continues as it does now. If the goal is signalled, play stops, as it does now. The game remains the same, except mistakes are at least minimalized, if not eliminated.

Replay advocates should ponder some questions. What situations should be subjected to replay? Foul calls? Offsides? Ball placement? Players entering the area before the PK is taken? Any suspected hand ball? Who makes the decision for replay? How quickly must the decision be made? Do coaches get to throw flags to halt play? Do goals count if they are scored between the disputed play and the replay? How about yellow and red cards during the same interval? Do they stand?

If futball is to continue as fans have come to know it, it must do it without replays. Bad ref decisions like the Tevez offside are as much as part of the game as Green's howler that was invaluable to USA's dramatic advance to the Round of 16. They were human errors in a game involving humans.

Posted by: runningcloud | June 29, 2010 8:54 AM | Report abuse

I know there is a lot of talk about Klinsman for national team coach or some such role, but has anyone thought of Sigi Schmid? He has been a winner at every level. He obviously knows how to identify talent b/c of his years at UCLA. I also have seen good team chemistry on the majority of his teams, and if it wasn't there he corrected it quickly by jettisoning the bad seeds. Just wondering other people's thoughts on this.

Posted by: fcrapidan | June 29, 2010 8:55 AM | Report abuse

Man, I love Ally McCoist and his scottish brogue! It's better than listening to Harkesy babble on and trying to sound british.

Posted by: combedge | June 29, 2010 9:04 AM | Report abuse

"And it won't be until the next World Cup — Brazil 2014 —when five pairs of officials' eyes will be employed instead of the current three."

Steve you might want to tell your boy Grahame about the 4th official. If he has any questions about its importance explain tell him about the last World Cup final and the role that Luis Medina Cantalejo played in that match.

Posted by: csd1 | June 29, 2010 9:31 AM | Report abuse

I love the World Cup and all, but I'm ready for this to be a DC United blog again. I'm going threw withdrawls over here. NEED UNITED NEWS

Posted by: dculuva | June 29, 2010 9:36 AM | Report abuse

"Man, I love Ally McCoist and his scottish brogue! It's better than listening to Harkesy babble on and trying to sound british.

Posted by: combedge | June 29, 2010 9:04 AM | Report abuse"


Amen. Having Harkes in the booth for the most-watched game in US soccer history was as big of a FAIL as losing to Ghana.

In fact, ESPN and FIFA have a similar problem. They have inexhaustible resources and great systems to determine the most qualified booth/referee talent, but all of that is overridden by entirely unrelated political considerations. So, maddeningly, dangerously unqualified (or just incompetent) professionals are thrust into the spotlight at the worst possible time.

Use two extra officials, and use ONLY their performance as criteria for their selection, and the officiating will definitely improve.

Replay is a stupid idea for innumerable reasons. The running clock, lack of routine stoppages, and YES, the lack of resources at various levels of the sport to name just three.

Never mind the fact that future classes of referees will become even worse at their jobs. Look at the NFL: five referees on the field, and more in the booth, they only have to actually judge plays a few seconds at a time, a total of 11 or 12 minutes out of a three hour game. And they probably blow more calls today than ever before!

As for diving and phantom fouls, discipline should be tightened and can be handed down after the fact. When players are forced to actually play with some respect for the game and its rules, the ref's job becomes easier. When refs repeatedly whistle things they don't see (because they didn't happen), they need to be disciplined as well.

Of course, WC refs will still blow it. In NED-SVK, there were four clear fouls the entire game. All were whistled, and all received yellow cards (two correctly). Meanwhile, at least two dozen fouls were called that did not happen! Still a great game, but I think having to provide a written or oral defense of every one of those calls, in the face of video evidence, would do more to improve the referee's future performances than one or two appeals to a replay official.

Posted by: Godfather_of_Goals | June 29, 2010 9:38 AM | Report abuse

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/06/28/AR2010062801190.html?waporef=obinsite

"Then, like all the major sports, the technology will take over more and more decisions.

And like all the other big-time sports, soccer will be slower, more disjointed, just as contentious and ultimately worse off because of it."

Posted by: csd1 | June 29, 2010 9:45 AM | Report abuse

runningcloud - how about only reviewing plays that end up with a scored goal. Play is already stopped at that point. If a goal is scored, a booth official reviews only for offsides or handball and the review is time constrained to one minute. The goal line technology such as what is used in the NHL is certainly worth considering. This proposal would address the Lampard goal, disallow the Tevez goal and cover the Henry case. Thoughts?

Posted by: tcbannon | June 29, 2010 9:46 AM | Report abuse

Why not just put dedicated officials on the end-lines. This way, play can continue and we don't have to worry about impacting the flow of the game.

Posted by: BT23 | June 29, 2010 9:57 AM | Report abuse

UNITED NEWS FLASH:

STILL IN LAST PLACE WITH WORST RECORD IN THE LEAGUE.

Is that enough news for now or do you want more?

Posted by: OWNTF | June 29, 2010 10:14 AM | Report abuse

In discussing whether or not there is the need to change US MNT leadership, why has there been no discussion about changing leadership at the USSF? Why has Sunil skated through any discussion when the subject is accountability and resposibility for the team's international performance? Should he be less accountable than the head coach fo how the program does?

Posted by: mightymax | June 29, 2010 10:19 AM | Report abuse

MIghty nice of Blatter to apologize to the English and Mexican federations (assuming it actually happened).

Sepp, in case you don't have contact info, you can reach the USSF @ screwyoublatter@ussoccer.com.

Posted by: benonthehill | June 29, 2010 10:24 AM | Report abuse

Put two extra refs on the goal lines- they could have a better vantage point on the Edu & England goals and prevented the mistakes there. Maybe even on the Argentina goal (Unfortunately, probably not the Dempsey goal because it was so close). But all officials are only human.

But DON'T use replay. God, please don't. One of the reasons I prefer soccer over American football is that the games are fast-paced, without little breaks in which to wander off. You add those, the lure of the game will be lost.

I agree with a poster above that said they need to take a better after-game look at diving. Could FIFA perhaps review the game tape and if they detect diving, maybe give that player a post-game yellow card? The player would get warned and it would be added to their accumulation (this could work in leagues like the MLS who suspend players for accumulation too!). It wouldn't be stopping play, but players would be motivated to not do it as much.

Posted by: revsfanindc | June 29, 2010 10:40 AM | Report abuse

@dculuva: another plug for the good guys:
http://www.blackandredunited.com/
Shatz and Chest do a great job over there and you need not worry about getting censored for using a naughty word or two here and there...:)

On replay: I just think they need to have an extra set of eyes watching the goal lines like they did in Europa League. That should be enough IMHO.

Posted by: DadRyan | June 29, 2010 10:44 AM | Report abuse

I am not sure what people are talking about when they say that goal line technology would disrupt the flow of soccer. When a goal was a goal, but the ref didn't see it, the game is going to stop, the players are going to be arguing, the ref is going to be talking to his side ref, they will all be talking to each other via ear piece.

If anything, it would streamline the process.

As for the "controversy is good for the game," it's good for a story. The hand of ball goal is a great story. But we've had enough of them. I'm more than happy to have the past be the wild west, because there's no real reason other than fear of change to resist the upgrade.

Posted by: UnitedDemon | June 29, 2010 10:52 AM | Report abuse

Would love to see Gulati step down and create a comprehensive overhaul of USSF with B. Bradley moving on as well.

Both did a nice job but change is needed to take a significant step forward.

Every goal scored in the WC should be reviewed for off-side / ball crossing the line / hand-ball leading to a goal; it is easily installed as play has stopped. I don't think you can review off-side calls not leading to goals or other during the course of the match scenarios but every goal or disputed goal

Posted by: Zipfutbol | June 29, 2010 10:57 AM | Report abuse

Would love to see Gulati step down and create a comprehensive overhaul of USSF with B. Bradley moving on as well.

Both did a nice job but change is needed to take a significant step forward.

Every goal scored in the WC should be reviewed for off-side / ball crossing the line / hand-ball leading to a goal; it is easily installed as play has stopped. I don't think you can review off-side calls not leading to goals or other during the course of the match scenarios but every goal or disputed goal.

Question: why did U.S. not play with five (5) in the back for the first 25 minutes against Ghana just to stabilize and get settled in - BB must have known the chances of the team coming out flat & being tired were very high.

Demerit & C. Boca looked exhausted from the get go and were clearly overpowered throught the match. They needed help back there.

Posted by: Zipfutbol | June 29, 2010 11:01 AM | Report abuse

Every goal scored in the WC should be reviewed for off-side / ball crossing the line / hand-ball leading to a goal; it is easily installed as play has stopped. I don't think you can review off-side calls not leading to goals or other during the course of the match scenarios but every goal or disputed goal.

Posted by: Zipfutbol | June 29, 2010 11:01 AM | Report abuse

---

Play hadn't stopped for the England goal. Maybe for the Dempsey/Edu/Argentina goals, but not the England goal- the German keeper collected it- since it never went out of bounds, according to the referee.

I'm not entirely against the goal-line in-ball technology because it would not require review- the ref would be notified that the ball crossed the line or not. But very few disputed goals are going to be solved by this- Edu and Dempsey and Argentina's goals all passed the line, but it was other calls that disallowed/allowed them unjustly.

Posted by: revsfanindc | June 29, 2010 11:24 AM | Report abuse

Normally, I'd figure Landon gets two weeks to recover, but given that is the 4th of July game and considering the World Cup he just had. I bet he'll play some during Sunday's game. Maybe just as a second half sub.

Posted by: CACuzcatlan | June 29, 2010 12:30 PM | Report abuse

""After having witnessed such a situation," Blatter said, referring to England's non-goal against Germany, "we have to open again this file, definitely." "

----------------------------------------------------

Honestly, what utter stupidity or sheer dissembling!!

Has there been a World Cup in the last 30 years (since replays became so ubiquitous) that didn't have "evidence" of bad, game-changing referee decisions? Is Blatter so thick-headed that he didn't expect there would be bad calls showed over and over again in this Cup? So, now that they can't do anything about those calls, they're going to re-visit the issue? Feh!

I think that it boggles the mind when I read FIFA spokesman saying that it was a definite "mistake" to show the replay of Tevez' offside goal on the stadium videoboards. The mistake is in not having a system to overturn such a miserable decision. Frankly, with what fans pay to see the games, they should expect to be able to watch a replay of every goal, even if it should have been disallowed.

As for how to implement such a system -- Obvious choices would be threefold: Reviews limited to goals allowed; Reviews that would include both goals allowed and disallowed (stoppages in play after each); and a system of challenges whereby coaches could get the fourth official to stop play -- maybe one challenge allowed per game. In the latter case, there would have to be some minimums and limitations to prevent abusive use of the challenge to disrupt the opposition.

Of course, reviewing disallowed goals can be problematic, if the referee is blowing his whistle prematurely. Players would have to be instructed to play thorough the whistles, which is normally something the referees hand out yellow cards for doing. Otherwise, you have to put in what the NFL does -- where the non-fumble call is not reviewable if the whistle blew to stop play.

As noted above, goal-line tech could also be used to indicate goals. Play would be stopped at that moment, but that's entirely appropriate since a goal should have been allowed.

Posted by: fischy | June 29, 2010 12:46 PM | Report abuse

End-line officials could help -- or just complicate things. Do their decisions automatically overrule other officials? Do they assist the referee the way sideline judges do? It's rare a referee overrules a sideline judge. Then, there's the human element. These guys wil lstand around for 90 minutes or more. How alert will they be during hte one or two plays a game that might invovle them?

What plays will they decide? If they're just deciding whether a ball crossed the line, then you're talking about making a close call once every 500 games or so... Seems hardly worth it, when there are much more cost-efficient and more precise ways to get the right call. If they're to have input on plays like Edu's disallowed goal, you have to get back to what to do about the referee's whistle which came before the header. I'm not against extra eyes, but it might require changes in the way referees do their thing.

Posted by: fischy | June 29, 2010 12:56 PM | Report abuse

End-line officials could help -- or just complicate things. Do their decisions automatically overrule other officials? Do they assist the referee the way sideline judges do? It's rare a referee overrules a sideline judge. Then, there's the human element. These guys wil lstand around for 90 minutes or more. How alert will they be during the one or two plays a game that might involve them?

What plays will they decide? If they're just deciding whether a ball crossed the line, then you're talking about making a close call once every 500 games or so... Seems hardly worth it, when there are much more cost-efficient and more precise ways to get the right call. If they're to have input on plays like Edu's disallowed goal, you have to get back to what to do about the referee's whistle which came before the header. I'm not against extra eyes, but it might require changes in the way referees do their thing.

Posted by: fischy | June 29, 2010 12:57 PM | Report abuse

Ha! Bob Ley just reported that Sepp Blather tweeted his "apologies" to England and Mexico. What a pompous buffoon.

Posted by: benonthehill | June 29, 2010 1:14 PM | Report abuse

i'm with tracee. i find it hard to seriously understand the "flow of the game" defense when players feign injury whilst diving, wasting time, and stopping the "flow of the game". i think along with replay, FIFA should address this. soccer would be 1000 times better for it.

Posted by: hokiesoccerfan | June 29, 2010 2:42 PM | Report abuse

Somebody should tell Hiddink that Blatter should resign for other reasons. Blatter and his cronies are corrupt bastards who have turned FIFA into a totalitarian, third-world state. Live forever, Andrew Jennings!!

Posted by: JosephDHippolito | June 29, 2010 3:01 PM | Report abuse

What european club in their right mind is going to take the chance of hiring Bradley? Maybe a team in Norway or even a smaller club in Scotland. But beyond that, be serious. If they wouldn't hire Arena why would the hire Bradley?

He's not going anywhere except back to MLS or to college.

Posted by: hacksaw | June 29, 2010 6:02 PM | Report abuse

RE: Replay. Why not let the 4th official review video to determine if a ball completely crossed the line, and only if the ball crossed the line? The referee already has the option of calling advantage when a foul is committed and then awarding a free kick if the advantage doesn't develop. All the officials are connected via radios, so the 4th official can easily signal the referee if ball completely crossed the line while the referee can continue monitoring the game.

Posted by: Chewie- | June 29, 2010 7:28 PM | Report abuse

First get off your high horse...second you do realize Mr. Gulati is in an unpaid position....right? Third Kilinsman is not the answer....thanks...


Gulati, I think he has done an amicable job, but change is needed. Either he signs up Klinsmann as a top adviser, or he steps down as the head of the USSF, I feel change is needed. On one hand our results in South Africa may be just good enough for some, on the other if this were a serious footballing country it is BLARINGLY obvious we need a new system and direction from top to bottom, we did not succeed. The USSF has the money to make the United States a TOP contender, it is about time we acted like it and do things accordingly.

Posted by: Shark21 | June 30, 2010 12:05 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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