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New Format Refreshes Terps

After a while, the conference slate can become a bit of a grind for any team. Especially near the end, the repetition and seemingly constant turnaround has a tendency to create a somewhat stale atmosphere.

Maryland, for example, played three games in a seven-day stretch from Feb. 25 to March 3. The competition itself is enough to get the juices flowing; that's not the issue. It's the time in between that can begin to wear on a team.

"Once the regular season's over," Gary Williams said, "there's that lift that you get from doing something different."

This week's ACC tournament certainly constitutes "something different." Maryland potentially could play four games in four days. After the first game, there's no time for practice, no time for major adjustments and no time for over-analyzing previous performances. According to Williams, that change of pace often is well-received.

"It's very easy to play two games in two days," Williams said. "They're 18-22 years old. They're certainly in good enough shape to do that so the physical part of it isn't hard. Three games in three days, we had to do that in Florida so that's not hard either. It's just, if we get to that fourth game, that'd probably be pretty tough."

Technically, the Terps played three games in four days while at the Old Spice Classic in Orlando last Thanksgiving, but you get the idea.

As for entering tomorrow night's matchup against N.C. State fresh off consecutive losses, Williams said he was not concerned. His team has rebounded "after a couple of losses that could have been termed 'embarrassing,'" already this season. He sees no reason why they cannot do it again.

And in regards to the fact his team's NCAA tournament hopes hinge on winning not just one, but at least two ACC tournament games, Williams said the focus simply has to remain on beating the Wolfpack, as difficult as that might be at times.

"You just worry about N.C. State," Williams said. "All that other stuff is ... there's a lot of scenarios after N.C. State, but there's only one scenario in the first game."

By Steve Yanda  |  March 11, 2009; 9:12 AM ET
Categories:  Men's basketball  
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Next: Terps' Wish List: Good Looks And Free Throws

Comments

"Technically, the Terps played three games in four days while at the Old Spice Classic in Orlando last Thanksgiving, but you get the idea."

I don't know whether to laugh at that sentence or cry thinking about getting blown out by Georgetown. I would say the only good thing about an NIT bid would be the prospect of handing them back a 30 point blowout down the line but, at this point, Georgetown might not win a game in the NIT.

Posted by: virtueandvice | March 11, 2009 9:32 AM | Report abuse

If you reallly want to see the direction of where recruiting and AAU coaches is going check out this article

http://rivals.yahoo.com/ncaa/basketball/news?slug=ys-agents031109&prov=yhoo&type=lgns


Yanda and Prisbell are chasing down shoe companies who no longer have influence. Attacking Maryland and Under Armour is nieve, why bite the hand that feeds you and cast a bad light, you two just don't get it

Posted by: fzuylen | March 11, 2009 11:25 AM | Report abuse

As disappointed as I am about how the season has ended, two things have eased the pain somewhat. 1) Maryland's womens team beating UNC and Duke and grabbing a #1 seed. I went to a lot of women's games in Cole and that definitely means something to me. And, much less significantly, 2)At least we're not G'town. What kind of funk overcame THAT team? I don't follow them closely but something must be deeply wrong in their locker room.

Posted by: jake177 | March 11, 2009 12:26 PM | Report abuse

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