May 20: Gonzales likely to resign before no-confidence vote

Also on the Sunday shows: Lawmakers call immigration deal a good first step; Pelosi rejects benchmark proposal; An 18th Century Debate--on NBC; Ron Paul defends foreign policy

Attorney General Alberto Gonzales is likely to resign before the Senate takes up a no-confidence resolution, according to Sen. Arlen Specter (Pa.), the ranking Republican on the Judiciary Committee. A vote on such a measure could come as early as this week.

"I have a sense ... that before the vote is taken, that Attorney General Gonzales may step down" because of the likelihood that such a resolution would pass, Specter said on CBS's "Face the Nation." "It is a very forceful, historical statement. ... And I think ... that he would prefer to avoid that kind of an historical black mark."

Specter has been critical of Gonzales, and yesterday he called testimony last week by James Comey, a former acting attorney general, about Gonzales's actions in March 2004 "very damaging to Attorney General Gonzales."

But Specter declined to say whether Gonzales should resign or how he would vote on a no-confidence resolution.

Comey told the Senate Judiciary Committee that Gonzales, then White House counsel, and former White House chief of staff Andrew Card went to an ailing John Ashcroft's hospital room to press the then attorney general to renew the administration's warrantless wiretapping program. Ashcroft refused.

Sen. Charles Schumer (N.Y.), one of the sponsors of the no-confidence resolution, signaled that he would seek to widen the inquiry into the hospital episode. He said that he is sending letters to President Bush, Vice President Cheney and Cheney's chief of staff, David Addington, inquiring as to who ordered Gonzales and Card to make the request of Ashcroft.

"The only person who thinks the attorney general should remain attorney general is the president," Schumer said on "Fox News Sunday."

Lawmakers call immigration deal a good first step

Lawmakers in both parties expressed modest support for a proposal to overhaul the nation's immigration laws, calling it a good first step but saying it will require weeks of debate to strengthen it.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said debate on the bill, scheduled to begin tomorrow, will last at least two weeks, and that lawmakers likely will introduce several amendments. "It's an improvement over the status quo, and an improvement over last year," he said on ABC's "This Week." "Is it a perfect bill? No."

The White House and lawmakers in both parties announced an agreement last week that would combine enhanced border security with a guest worker program and a path to citizenship for many of the country's 12 million illegal immigrants. The bill faces concerns among conservatives, who deride it as providing "amnesty" for illegal immigrants, and liberals, who say it could create a second class of workers and undermine the long-standing principle in immigration law of keeping families together.

Schumer, the third-ranking Democrat in the Senate, called the measure a "fair starting point" but said he worries that its method of establishing priority for legal status emphasizes work skills over the need to keep families together.

He added that the bill's guest worker program - which would allow immigrants to temporarily take jobs Americans won't - could be a "stumbling block to the whole bill" because the immigrants might be paid substandard wages and stay on illegally after their work ends.

On ABC, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) echoed Schumer's concern about provisions that put at the front of the residency line immigrants who speak English or have specific job skills, rather than those with citizen children or spouses. "The family unification principles which had been fundamental to American immigration are disrupted by what is there now," she said.

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), an architect of the immigration deal, said on Fox that he welcomes proposals that improve it. But he warned members of his party who do not embrace immigration reform that they could be risking the future of the GOP. "When is the Republican Party going to solve this problem? When we lose every aspect of the government?" Graham asked.

On CNN's Late Edition, Rep. Brian Bilbray (R-Calif.) said the bill amounts to "amnesty" and would be a terrible move in securing the nation's borders. "The worst thing you can do if you try to control illegal immigration is reward 12 to 20 million illegal aliens with citizenship and permanent residency. That's why the border patrol agents oppose this bill."

Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez rejected the contention among some conservatives that the plan constitutes "amnesty" for illegal immigrants. "It's not amnesty," he said on CNN's "Late Edition." "They're going to have to pay a penalty. They're going to have to wait in line. They're going to have to undergo a criminal background check. It is not amnesty."

Pelosi rejects Senate benchmark proposal

Pelosi said she would not back a proposal gaining support in the Senate that would tie Iraqi reconstruction aid to political and economic benchmarks. "This is too little, too late," she said of the proposal made by Sen. John Warner (R-Va.). "This would have been an appropriate measure maybe three or four years ago. But the accountability is very meager in the bill."

McConnell said the White House will not get behind any legislation with a "retreat date," and warned that he has the votes to uphold a presidential veto.

"What the speaker needs to do is understand that there are two houses [of Congress], and at the end, if we're going to actually pass a law that the president can sign, what can get through the Senate is a critical point," he said.

Despite the seeming impasse, Pelosi said, "[W]e will have legislation to fund the troops" by Memorial Day.

The maverick Republican

Rep. Ron Paul (R-Tex.), a 2008 White House candidate, appeared on CNN to defend his non-interventionist foreign policy decisions after an explosive exchange last Tuesday with another GOP candidate, former New York mayor Rudolph Giuliani, during a debate.

Paul suggested that U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East was the reason the United States was attacked on Sept. 11, 2001. Giuliani demanded that Paul withdraw the statement; he refused.

Paul stood by his statement yesterday, saying it's not a "subjective opinion" but based on the "evidence." Middle East experts support his position, he added.

Host John King suggested some hypothetical foreign policy decisions -North Korea invading South Korea, and China invading Taiwan - and Paul said in both cases the president could not act without congressional approval.

"Absolutely, he doesn't have the authority," Paul said. "Why should we send hundreds of thousands of Americans to die in a civil war?"

Paul said his view of foreign policy - "don't go looking for dragons" -- follows in the tradition of Dwight Eisenhower and Richard Nixon and is much more of a Republican philosophy than the muscular views of other presidential candidates.

Asked whether, given his outside the mainstream views and his low standing in the polls, he should be included in further debates, he asked, "Why stomp out the grass-roots candidate?"

"I'm the most conservative member of Congress," he said, " ... and they say I'm not Republican enough."

An 18th century debate - on Meet the Press

Sen. Chris Dodd (D-Conn.) and former House speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) engaged in what NBC's "Meet the Press" host Tim Russert promised what was to be "an old-fashioned, robust political debate."

The 25 minutes were dedicated to Iraq -- no news broken here -- but it was apropos of the Sunday morning news shows to have the two men, both age 63 and with full heads of silver hair, sitting side by side.

The most notable exchange in the 25 minutes was a lengthy discourse on whether U.S. efforts in Iraq are tantamount to French support to the Americans during the Revolutionary War.

"Equating the American Revolution with the Civil War in Iraq today, please," Dodd quipped.

"It's exactly the same," Gingrich said, noting that it took 14 years - from 1775 to 1789 - for the new America to write a constitution.

Dodd pointed out that America had a George Washington - and nobody in Iraq is fulfilling that role today.

By the end of the exchange, both had trouble holding back their amusement with the hypothetical nature of the debate.

Russert could not resist one more question about Gingrich's presidential plans. (Dodd is, of course, a candidate for the Democratic nomination, and Gingrich said last week that, while there's a "great possibility" he will run, he will not decide on it until October.)

"If there's a big enough market among Republicans for really white haired candidates," Gingrich joked.

"How about a ticket?" Dodd interjected to bellowing laughter.

By Zachary Goldfarb |  May 20, 2007; 2:02 PM ET
Previous: May 20 Preview: Pelosi, McConnell and Judiciary Cmte. Members | Next: Immigration and '08 Longshots

Comments

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The first time I heard a politician say Gonzo would be forced to "spend more time with his family" was 5 months ago.(1/07)
It has *not* happened yet.

Posted by: Rod Stanton | May 20, 2007 2:46 PM

I like Ron Paul's quote: "I'm the most conservative member of Congress," he said, " ... and they say I'm not Republican enough."

He needs to get on some big corporation's or wealthy individual's payola list so he fits in better.

Posted by: ibsteve2u | May 20, 2007 2:48 PM

Gonzo, after being told by non-fired attorneys that his continued existence as Attorney General was hurting the credibility of the Justice Department apparently could care less...He is still pleasuring the president and making our "democracy" the laughing stock of the civilized world. Impeachment is not nearly enough for this fake amnesia fascist.

Posted by: braultrl | May 20, 2007 3:00 PM

Gonzo, after being told by non-fired attorneys that his continued existence as Attorney General was hurting the credibility of the Justice Department apparently could care less...He is still pleasuring the president and making our "democracy" the laughing stock of the civilized world. Impeachment is not nearly enough for this fake amnesia fascist.

Posted by: braultrl | May 20, 2007 3:00 PM

Attorney General Gonzales is the poster-boy
for this Administration. He has been inept, a puppet for political machinations,
dishonest, and unwilling to actually accept
responsibility for actions of his staff.
This is what we have watched throughout this President's administration. They have
operated with little oversight by the heretofore Republican Congress and thought
that they could do just about anything under the name of "War on Terror." The
Attorney General should have resigned long
ago but he will stay to the bitter end,
unlike most of his underlings who long ago
saw the writing on the wall. Gonzales en-
joys only the support of President Bush,
and that's a matter of loyalty, not good
political sense.

Posted by: Anonymous | May 20, 2007 3:00 PM

All this seems to fall under the category " slight of hand distraction". War profiteers are raking in billions of dollars at the cost of soldiers blood and national security and taxpayers money. Oil barons are laughing their asses off while they raise gas prices knowing full well we and our elected politicians cant do a damn thing. It's a sad time to be american.

Posted by: chris g | May 20, 2007 3:03 PM

Gonzales to resign huh? Let's hope Specter know what he's talking about.

Posted by: Tony Lucio | May 20, 2007 3:04 PM

Gonzales to resign huh? Let's hope Specter knows what he's talking about.

Posted by: Tony Lucio | May 20, 2007 3:04 PM

Bill Maher had on his latest show a young Congress woman from California discussing the substance of Ron Paul's statement in the South Carolina debate. She said, in truth, that what these post 9/11 Republicans rely upon to win ellections is
FEAR. They try to make us live in FEAR of repeating the trauma of 9/11, and make the pitch that THEY are the only ones who can protect us! Bah Humbug! Ron Paul is simply saying in a roundabout way that, as FDR said, we should be afraid of FEAR itself. The only ones who can protect us is We The People ourselves not some polticians debating for popular favor in South Carolina.

Posted by: John Ripandelli, Florida | May 20, 2007 3:04 PM

The silence in the country over the resignation of Bush appointees suggests the extent to which the Press has been silenced by their big business backers and the power of the right-wing. I have never experienced a time in the last forty years when presidential appointees have resigned under such clouds and the earth beneath the US has not shaken with the thunderous weight of the mighty falling. Bush's appointees, like Bush, can stonewall because, despite their low approval ratings, the right and big business would rather remain silent than expressed their disgust of their friends' activities.

Posted by: Gordon | May 20, 2007 3:05 PM

go, gonzo...just go! go bushie...just go! The neoconistic delusionists must go...Why not a special prosecutor to investigate bushie and company??? These a**holes make nixon look like a saint...Jimmy Carter stated the truth about bushie's administration...abominal!

Posted by: Terry B. | May 20, 2007 3:05 PM

As members of the Republican party step around Gonzales like he was a dead rat in the middle of the White House stairs, our feckless president continues to cling to this incompetent who is so emblematic of this administration's appointees.

Thus Boy George continues his unwitting destruction of the GOP--an eventuality that will not intrude into his reality until sometime in November 2008.

Posted by: mikeasr | May 20, 2007 3:07 PM

Bush could have nominated Gonzales to the supreme court and he probably would been confirmed by the Republican Senate. Think about it.

Posted by: Anonymous | May 20, 2007 3:13 PM

Mr Bush has said repeatedly, "Alberto Gonzalez has broken no laws and will continue to serve." As if competency ever mattered.

Well it turns out, talking about a top secret NSA program in front of a person with no security clearance (Mrs Ashcroft) is indeed against the law.

I never liked John Ashcroft until I met Alberto Gonzalez. My respect for the former grows each day.

Posted by: Liberal4RonPaul | May 20, 2007 3:13 PM

It was a pleasant surprise to watch an educated debate between two articulate politicians. I am not a Dodd fan however he approached his differences to Newts' with passion, facts, and a great deal of professionalism. Both of these men debated points that were different, but both respected each other and did not interupt while the other was speaking.
Mr. Russert, on the other hand, let them debate without interfering and encouraged this excellent exchange of philosphies.

This is the way all politicians should conduct themselves.

Posted by: Michael E. Schweitzer | May 20, 2007 3:15 PM

Gonzo needs glasses so he can read,

Mene, Mene, Tekel, Upharsin

Posted by: Bill | May 20, 2007 3:16 PM

Gonzales should stay. He is a reminder to all Republicans of the price to be paid when you vote for ideology instead of the public interest.

A good many of them voted for Bush because during the first election he said the most important thing in his life was "Jesus Christ". That statement was probably thought of by Rove, but hey those right wing evangelicals are just as likely to vote based on religion as are the nuts who listen to bin laden.

Gonzo should stay as a reminder to all, right wing and left wing, that you should always vote based on who would do the best for America, not who is best suited to their ideology.

Posted by: non | May 20, 2007 3:25 PM

Bush cronies are raining like cats and dogs this week. Where's my umbrella?

Posted by: Pepe le Pew, New Orleans | May 20, 2007 3:26 PM

Ron Paul makes more sense to me all the time. I believe it is the other Republicans running for President who are in lockstep and completely out of the mainstream. Unless there is a miraculous turnaround in Iraq, their blind faith to the administration will help ensure that a Democrat is elected in 08.

Posted by: phoaglan | May 20, 2007 3:35 PM

Alberto Gonzales is a perfect example of the criminals that come from Mexico.
Totally, and without remorse, a dyed in the wool criminal devoid of any feelings of obligation to American law.

Posted by: D.Wayne | May 20, 2007 3:36 PM

Gonzales has been caught lying to the public and congress repeatedly and has made one ethically questionable decision after another.

That Bush remains supportive of Gonzales is just more evidence of just how corrupt "The Decider" is himself. Fortunately, the founding fathers provided us with a remedy:

http://www.impeachbush.org

Posted by: War4Sale | May 20, 2007 3:43 PM

"It's exactly the same," Gingrich said, noting that it took 14 years"

I can't believe Professor Gingrich would say that. As someone with a PhD in European history, he should know that France entered the US War of Independence in early 1778 and hostilities ceased in October 1781 with the Battle of Yorktown. By comparison, the US has been involved in Iraq for more than four years, with no end in sight. It is Sen. Dodd who got this one right.

Posted by: Charles B. Hall | May 20, 2007 3:45 PM

Why do I feel like I have time traveled back to the time of Roman Empire? I believe this young country is in a spiral to destruction. I can hardly wait for the American right to starve to death watching the Great Wall Of America go up. Walls don't stop hungry, determined, working people. It didn't work in China or Berlin. What nut thinks it's going to work in America?

Posted by: Kenneth | May 20, 2007 3:47 PM

As the president said, this chimp isn't going anywhere save impeachment. there is too much to hide and gonzales is the wall of silence that protects us from harming ourselves, himself, everyone in texas and shrub.

Posted by: retardedgonzo | May 20, 2007 3:55 PM

"gonzales could have been nominated to the supreme court."

indeed worry.

are you forgetting roberts and alito?

are they not just way smarter clone copies?

Posted by: needtoworry | May 20, 2007 3:59 PM

I AM GOING TO VOTE FOR RON PAUL AND AGAINST THE NEO-FASCIST 'REPUBLICAN' GOOSE-STEPPERS. I FEEL SHAME!! I COME FROM A LONG LINE OF PROUD REPUBLICAN OHIO FARMERS WHO HAVE BLINDLY LET OUR PARTY BECOME MORE CORRUPT THAN THE DEMOCRATS

Posted by: Buster Hiemenn | May 20, 2007 4:11 PM

The Democratic Party cannot, and I believe Nancy, drive for IMPEACHMENT AT THIS TIME. would be problematic and creat stumbling blocks for the change in direction so neccessary at this time.
It is up to the grassroots of this country to begin to CLAMOR, CLAMOR,CLAMOR FOR IMPEACHMENT- FOR- TWO. Don't let up. Every waking moment,24-7 everyone demand the Impeachment of those two men,Bush and Chaney.Our country is at stake.
Be OUTRAGED!

Posted by: Joanne George | May 20, 2007 4:16 PM

Oh, I can think of a number of differences between the Iraq War and the American Revolution. In fact, the only way the analogy really makes sense is if you equate the American Occupation foces in Iraq with the Britsh and the Hessians in America, and the French with the Iranians, and I suspect that that wasn't the analogy Mr. Gingrich had in mind.

Posted by: Marshall | May 20, 2007 4:17 PM

The Democratic Party cannot, and I believe Nancy, drive for IMPEACHMENT AT THIS TIME. would be problematic and creat stumbling blocks for the change in direction so neccessary at this time.
It is up to the grassroots of this country to begin to CLAMOR, CLAMOR,CLAMOR FOR IMPEACHMENT- FOR- TWO. Don't let up. Every waking moment,24-7 everyone demand the Impeachment of those two men,Bush and Chaney.Our country is at stake.
Be OUTRAGED!

Posted by: Joanne George | May 20, 2007 4:17 PM

The best Paul quote from today doesn't appear in the summary above. He said that the problem with the Republican party today is that Republicans are scared to death to face the truth about the war, and that he considered it his job to stand up and tell them. Please please please say exactly that at the next debate, Congressman - I want to see Giuliani have a ferret attack and collapse into tears of rage.

Posted by: Fluffy | May 20, 2007 4:27 PM

Why has the media(including THIS rag ) not been TOTALLY OUTRAGED AND MORE VOCAL about the OBVIOUS lies and spirit of arrogant CORRUPTION in ALL persons in the current administration? WHY? BEAUSE YOU HAVE ALL TREASONOUSLY SOLD OUT THE PEOPLE OF AMERICA AND OUR CONSTITUTION FOR MONEY?...

YOU EXPLAIN IT, THEN...

in the meanwhile...


CALL YOUR CONGRESSIONAL REPS AND SENATORS AND DEMAND ACOUNTABILITY!!!

IMPEACH BUSH AND CHENEY!!

Posted by: Sad American | May 20, 2007 4:32 PM

If US government going to build a Great Wall along Mexican border, make sure to build it really good able to draw tourists from all over the world. At least it can pay its cost partially.

Posted by: StanleyW | May 20, 2007 4:33 PM

Let us hope that Senator Spector is right. Gonzales symbolizes everything that is wrong with the Bush administration - the arrogance, the deceit, and above all, the drive for absolute power. More than symbolizing them, Gonzales has actively aided and abetted these abuses of power by his support for torture, denial of habeas corpus and other basic rights to so called "enemy combatants", his disregard of the Geneva Convention, and, most recently, his purge of US attorneys who were unwilling to use the criminal justice system to intimidate Democratic opponents and minority voting rights advocates. His bizarre hospital visit to a sick Attorney General Ashcroft, no friend of civil liberties himself, in order to try to pressure Ashcroft into approving an illegal spying program, may also meet the definition of torture. If Gonzales doesn't resign, he should be impeached.

Posted by: Roger Algase | May 20, 2007 4:44 PM

Gonzo,

YOUR FIRED!

...clean out your desk.

Posted by: Donald T. | May 20, 2007 4:52 PM

The Great Wall of China was built to keep the Mongols out, and didn't work all too well, however, the Mongols weren*t exactly *working people.* As for the French connection, the colonies had declared their independence from England BEFORE the French arrived. We declared Iraq independent BEFORE the Iraqis did!

Posted by: TheGreatAndPowerfulOz | May 20, 2007 4:54 PM

All this ranting and raving about the ineptitude of this administration, and all of the lackeys that kiss GWBs (read Dick Cheney's") boots in exchange for a guaranteed job for the next 18 months, is mis-directed. If the gutless Democratic Congress that we just elected would represent the will of the people, most to the members of the Bush White House, Bush included, would be impeached, fired, tried, convicted, and jailed for the treason they are perpetuating against our nation.
Gonzo is just an insecure little man that will never quit under any circumstances, because he's afraid he could never get another job. And anyone that can't see that Bush is just trying to run out the clock on the war in Iraq, so he can blame the next administration for losing a war that should have never been started and cannot be won militarily.
I have a question. In order for us to win this "War on Terror", who has to say "I give up"? Is there someone that speaks for all the terrorists in the world that hate us now...., the ones that didn't even know we existed until Bush and his minions declared war on the Islamic world?
Traitors in one branch of government, and gutless cowards in the other. It's a shame that "We the People" can't just clean the slate and start over, (We COULD), but the American people have turned into a bunch of herd animals, so involved in their own lives and problems, that they will no longer step up and get involved.

Posted by: Keith | May 20, 2007 5:06 PM

Again, missguided support of an incompatent individual put in place to maintain a failed policy.
Brownie? Meyers? Rumsfeld? Wolfy? Gonzo? Rice? Cheny? Rove?
We should cry, get it out of our system, then systematically go after each of these monsters for the security of the nations' future.
If we allow this to go unpunished, we can kiss our great nation adios.

Of course the attacks were a result of our involvement in the middle east!
Any one who disagrees should read up on the history of Standard oil, I mean the CIA, I mean the state department involvement in Iraq, I mean Iran, I mean Saudi Arabia, oops I mean Afgahnistan.

We invade a country, unprovoked, and wonder why they are defending themselves?
This is the logic that got a coward elected (almost) to the presidency. Logic based on ignorance of our actions.

I think we deserve better!

Posted by: Thosch | May 20, 2007 5:10 PM

If we want to get something done, we should start a campaign that would vote out ALL federally elected incumbents in each election cycle until we get people in office that realize the "We the People" are really the boss. Anything less than that, WILL NOT WORK.

Posted by: Keith | May 20, 2007 5:11 PM

Resign? Over a "meaningless stunt" (according to Bush)? Wow, I just hope the Dem controlled congress keeps up the meaningless stunts until all the trash is taken out.

Posted by: Derl | May 20, 2007 5:14 PM

What about all the local democrats that were selectively target by the loyal "Bushies?" Are they ever going to get a fair shake? A fair review?

Posted by: Jub Ernest | May 20, 2007 5:15 PM

Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain!

Everything will be, uh ...OKAY!.

The Great and Powerful OZ has spoken...

Go back to your business...

Nothing here to see...

Pray for Whirled Peas...

Posted by: OZ, The Great | May 20, 2007 5:18 PM

Isaiah was right though he wrote years before:::>

Isa 33:1 Ah, you destroyer, who yourself have not been destroyed, you traitor, whom none has betrayed! When you have ceased to destroy, you will be destroyed; and when you have finished betraying, they will betray you.
Isa 33:2 O LORD, be gracious to us; we wait for you. Be our arm every morning, our salvation in the time of trouble.
Isa 33:3 At the tumultuous noise peoples flee; when you lift yourself up, nations are scattered,
Isa 33:4 and your spoil is gathered as the caterpillar gathers; as locusts leap, it is leapt upon.
Isa 33:5 The LORD is exalted, for he dwells on high; he will fill Zion with justice and righteousness,
Isa 33:6 and he will be the stability of your times, abundance of salvation, wisdom, and knowledge; the fear of the LORD is Zion's treasure.
Isa 33:7 Behold, their heroes cry in the streets; the envoys of peace weep bitterly.
Isa 33:8 The highways lie waste; the traveler ceases. Covenants are broken; cities are despised; there is no regard for man.
Isa 33:9 The land mourns and languishes; Lebanon is confounded and withers away; Sharon is like a desert, and Bashan and Carmel shake off their leaves.
Isa 33:10 "Now I will arise," says the LORD, "now I will lift myself up; now I will be exalted.
Isa 33:11 You conceive chaff; you give birth to stubble; your breath is a fire that will consume you.
Isa 33:12 And the peoples will be as if burned to lime, like thorns cut down, that are burned in the fire."
Isa 33:13 Hear, you who are far off, what I have done; and you who are near, acknowledge my might.
Isa 33:14 The sinners in Zion are afraid; trembling has seized the godless: "Who among us can dwell with the consuming fire? Who among us can dwell with everlasting burnings?"

Posted by: natamllc | May 20, 2007 5:22 PM

Show Halliburton the money!

Posted by: Anonymous | May 20, 2007 5:26 PM

I'm fantasizing that the above comments are representative of the American public and not just a select group of Democrat partisans.Make my day! Tell me I'm close to right.

Posted by: howard m yonet | May 20, 2007 5:36 PM

I'm fantasizing that the above comments are representative of the American public and not just a select group of Democrat partisans.Make my day! Tell me I'm close to right.

Posted by: howard m yonet | May 20, 2007 5:36 PM

Carter is right. Bush is the worst. The AG is a disgrace to legal profession. He confirms Bush's own disdain for lawyers by acting as if he was serving a corporate client and not the American people.

US citizens die daily defending a Constituion that is being re-written in secret by political cronies and incompetents.

Posted by: JM Parras | May 20, 2007 5:37 PM

Carter is right. Bush is the worst. The AG is a disgrace to legal profession. He confirms Bush's own disdain for lawyers by acting as if he was serving a corporate client and not the American people.

US citizens die daily defending a Constituion that is being re-written in secret by political cronies and incompetents.

Posted by: JM Parras | May 20, 2007 5:37 PM

D.Wayne - you are a perfect example of racists that come from the United States.

Posted by: Roy | May 20, 2007 5:38 PM

D.Wayne - you are a perfect example of racists that come from the United States.

Posted by: Roy | May 20, 2007 5:38 PM

The administration does not want Gonzo to resign because they would have to go through the process of replacing him. They would have 2 choices:

1. Another neocon idiot who would walk in lockstep with this failed administration. This would lead to an ugly confirmation battle and the Republicans in the Senate would be put on a real hot seat.

2. An honest independent outsider who would do the job properly. This goes against everything this administration stands for.

If he does resign it will be interesting to see which way they go.

Posted by: DocG | May 20, 2007 6:01 PM

Why is perjury a good enough charge to impeach a president for, but not a lying sack of attorney general?

Posted by: danhagen | May 20, 2007 6:08 PM

The Bush Administration seems to have a knack for appointing the wrong person for every job. I wouldn't be surprised if Bush nominates Gonzo to run the World Bank.

Posted by: James | May 20, 2007 6:22 PM

WHEN BUSH OPENS HIS MOUTH , IT CONFIRMS THE IGNORANT, IMBECILE LOOK ON HIS FACE!!!!

Posted by: bubba | May 20, 2007 6:26 PM

WHEN BUSH OPENS HIS MOUTH , IT CONFIRMS THE IGNORANT, IMBECILE LOOK ON HIS FACE!!!!

Posted by: bubba | May 20, 2007 6:26 PM

WHEN BUSH OPENS HIS MOUTH , IT CONFIRMS THE IGNORANT, IMBECILE LOOK ON HIS FACE!!!!

Posted by: bubba | May 20, 2007 6:26 PM

when bush opens his mouth , it confirms the look of an imbecile on his face!!!!!better impeach him now!!!

Posted by: johnsons old grey mule | May 20, 2007 6:30 PM

when bush opens his mouth , it confirms the look of an imbecile on his face!!!!!better impeach him now!!!

Posted by: johnsons old grey mule | May 20, 2007 6:30 PM

Impeach Bush and Cheney, and arrest Karl Roves and deport him to North Korea, or worse, Saudi Arabia. As a New Yorker, all I can say is don't ever let middle America vote again. Anyone from the religious right should be banned from entering a voting booth. Bush and Cheney are the result of what happens when the only topic people can think of as a qualification for a presidential candidate is what women are doing with their bodies. Boy, I wish we could be secular like Turkey.

Posted by: Laura | May 20, 2007 6:39 PM

Bush has learned nothing. misleading america to go to war with Iraq, A. G Gonzo who has no regard for the Justice Dept or the Constitution, warrantless wiretaps all political disasters that he will embrace until the end. This nightmare needs to stop. The irony that the Administration and GOP says the Dems need a civics lesson!!!

They need to do the Gonzo no confidence and then the Bush/Chaney vote of no confidence, it may be non binding but the American people have a right to know which of their Senators are supporting the criminals in the White House and who is not!

Posted by: rcc2000 | May 20, 2007 6:42 PM

Gonzales is emblematic of the rot that pervades this Administration. Honor to these people is a faint echo of a distant time when public servants actually lived up to their titles. When it comes to what this nation needs most, that is Bush stepping down and Cheney following his lead so that America can begin to recover, that chimp won't hunt.

Posted by: Dewey Listen | May 20, 2007 6:50 PM

Gonzales is emblematic of the rot that pervades this Administration. Honor to these people is a faint echo of a distant time when public servants actually lived up to their titles. When it comes to what this nation needs most, that is Bush stepping down and Cheney following his lead so that America can begin to recover, that chimp won't hunt.

Posted by: Dewey Listen | May 20, 2007 6:51 PM

I have proved my ability to pleasure the President. Therefore I have the necessary qualifications. If Fredo resigns, the Lord hath already chosen me to become Attorney General of the United States Department of Justice and the President's Office of Faith-Based initiatives already embedded therein by executive order/Deciderization.

Posted by: America's Spiritual Leader and Senior White House Advisor to the Commander in Chief, Pastor Ted Hagg | May 20, 2007 6:54 PM

Criminals are in the white house. They must be punished.

Posted by: sara martindale-raptis | May 20, 2007 6:54 PM

Cant lose this dude fast enough. He has the brain of a pea...chuckle chuckle

Posted by: chukles | May 20, 2007 7:04 PM

I was extremely upset after watching the republican debate for many reasons, but the most being that the one person telling the truth about foreign policy was vilified. Ron Paul is correct that terrorists hate us not for our freedom or money(as the administration would like Americans to believe), they hate us for our involvement in the middle east, support of Israel,and for our illegal war which has killed thousands of our own soldiers and probably hundreds of thousands of innocent Iraqis. The greatest evil of the republicans since 9/11 has been feeding Americans with untruths and fear. These untruths began with the reasons for going to war(WMD), have continued throughout the war(Victory), and the latest untruth of "they will follow us home" which is now being spoken by operatives everywhere as a reason to continue the war. You would think that after Vietnam, we would have learned something. I hope Ron Paul gets more attention and press for being the only reasonable republican candidate.

Posted by: Andrea K | May 20, 2007 7:08 PM

on Gonzalez: Bush is very likely to ask him to stay just to ride over the World Bank mess and to stick a thumb in the eye of Congress.

on immigration: gee, if you come here illegally and you get to stay here because you've been here illegally for so long and worked here illegally for so long, that's not just amnesty for years of illegal behavior, it's *rewarding* years of illegal behavior. Why don't we do this to "solve" the drug problem, too? hey've you'e been dealing and doing drugs for years. It's ok. Stop doing it in the shadows. Come on out and become a legitimate drug dealer, pay a $5k tax and we'll let you deal all day as long as you don't get caught dealing or doing drugs.
Do they really think that if they legalize these people, that they will work the same jobs for the same salaries? Living the same lives that they did as illegals? And nobody else from Latin America will come here and do the same thing? Are these people crazy?

Posted by: cc | May 20, 2007 7:20 PM

well, maybe the "terrorists" do hate us for our "way of life", which is, clearly, going around the world and killing, repressing, arresting, torturing and in general simply exploiting Muslims, and claiming that it is ok because we are Americans.

I mean, if we attack them, how can we criticize them for attacking us? It's like a slaveowner justifying his attacks on slave countries because they want to destroy him. Ok we're not actually taking these people as *slaves*, but what are we not doing short of that? Ultimately war perpetuates itself simply because the two sides are willing to fight. We can say that they are wrong for attacking us...and so can they say that we are wrong, for attacking them.

Posted by: cc | May 20, 2007 7:25 PM

"Gonzales is emblematic of the rot that pervades this Administration."

...and this administration is emblematic of the rot that pervades this country.

Posted by: cc | May 20, 2007 7:27 PM

When Sigmund Freud stepped off the boat in New York city for the first time and looked around him,it is reported that he said"this is a huge mistake",referring to America.I'm an American,but I'm beginning to think that perhaps he was right.Our sad situation in America today is the result of decades of deceit by the powerful and apathy by the many citizens whose attitude has been that if does not affect them,then,they do not care to know.This type of cultural and political climate ensures that no one ever has to be responsible or accountable.

Posted by: Devra | May 20, 2007 7:49 PM

The more I think about this, the more I want Gonzales to stay in office, and Bush to keep fighting this nonsensical war. That's right, keep it up, you pathetic Bushies; all the lying, all the incompetence, all the far-right weirdness that has come to symbolize what Jimmy Carter has quite rightly called the worst administration in history. Keep up the good work, guys, and in November 2008, you will take an electoral pounding, the likes of which we haven't seen since 1932. I'm feeling better already...

Posted by: Mike | May 20, 2007 7:55 PM

After reading a number of the posted far left comments, all I have to say is "God help this country" if these cheerleading, light weights are an accurate reflection of the Democratic party base. If they manage to take the White House in 08, look for the following consequences: terrorism on our shores, a sinking stock market and an emboldened China that will make a re-assertive Russia look like Sweden.

Posted by: Robert | May 20, 2007 8:01 PM

Robert: Is that the best you've got? Elect Democrats and the country goes to hell? I've got news for you: we're there now.

Posted by: Mike | May 20, 2007 8:04 PM

What is this ""no confidence?" Another way to say "We have no power to fire him, but we want to look as if we know what we are doing?"

Get the to England and get elected to the system that has "no confidence" votes for real.

Who thought of such an idiotic waste of time?

Posted by: Gary Masters | May 20, 2007 8:12 PM

"I've got news for you: we're there now."

Not even close. Try Germany or Japan in 1945. You may not know as much as you need to participate.

Posted by: Gary Masters | May 20, 2007 8:14 PM

Mike: au contraire. We're still safe, prosperous and still the leader of the free world. I admire the Democratic party--just not its current Carterlike leaders.

Posted by: Robert | May 20, 2007 8:16 PM

Mike: au contraire. We're still safe, prosperous and still the leader of the free world. I admire the Democratic party--just not its current Carterlike leaders.

Posted by: Robert | May 20, 2007 8:16 PM

Well for me the issue is to try to understand Bush, who seems so drowned in cronyism and incompetence. Does he seriously think that Gonzo's incompetence & support for torture & warrantless wiretaps is correct? Or did he hand over his govt. a long time ago to paranoids in Cheney's office? I guess I keep waiting for some sign of intelligence there; although I'm a Democrat, I did think G. Bush Sr. had some decent ideas & came to office with credible experience, & handled Gulf War I pretty well. So what happened to W? brains rotted out by drink? by neocons seducing him?

Posted by: cgilbert | May 20, 2007 8:26 PM

OK, maybe we're not in hell -- I'll admit to some hyperbole -- but, even you right-side-of-the-margin people have to admit: this Bush administration is just awful; the president can't speak in consecutive coherent sentences without a staplegun; the war is a disaster, and worse, a totally unneeded disaster; the administration has made a complete hash of the Katrina aftermath, and, now, with the pitiful excuse of an Attorney General, you have a man that goes to the sickbed of his predecessor to ask him to sign off on illegal spying that even Mr. Ashcroft knew was way out of bounds. Please, guys, just for my own amazement: name me one significant POSITIVE accomplishment of this administration; just one. Good luck; you'll need it, because there isn't one. This is the worst presidential administration in history.

Posted by: Mike | May 20, 2007 8:34 PM

I hope that the mainstream media puts Ron Paul under public scrutiny for claiming to be the most conservative candidate in the Republican party, because I think once they do they'll reveal that he is.

Posted by: Seer | May 20, 2007 8:44 PM

I hope that the mainstream media puts Ron Paul under public scrutiny for claiming to be the most conservative candidate in the Republican party, because I think once they do they'll reveal that he is.

Posted by: Seer | May 20, 2007 8:44 PM

I have two names for you: Lincoln and Truman. Both had troubled administrations and were unpopular presidents. I'm not saying GWB is Lincoln, but his foreign policy will be judged over the next twenty to thirty years. I'll buy you a drink in Hawaii and we can compare notes. Oh by the way it's "the economy......".

Posted by: Robert | May 20, 2007 8:51 PM

Maybe, just maybe there is a voice of reason out there that can convince Gonzales to be "nudged" out to a new post!

OsiSpeaks.com

Posted by: Anonymous | May 20, 2007 8:52 PM

Maybe, just maybe there is a voice of reason out there that can convince Gonzales to be "nudged" out to a new post!

OsiSpeaks.com

Posted by: KYJurisDoctor | May 20, 2007 8:53 PM

"'It's exactly the same,' Gingrich said, noting that it took 14 years'

I can't believe Professor Gingrich would say that. As someone with a PhD in European history, he should know that France entered the US War of Independence in early 1778 and hostilities ceased in October 1781 with the Battle of Yorktown. By comparison, the US has been involved in Iraq for more than four years, with no end in sight. It is Sen. Dodd who got this one right."

I wish I'd have had the opportunity to challenge him on that.

'So, Mr. Gingrich, the American Revolution was the idea of the French? The French spearheaded the drive to remove the monarchy and provided the bulk of troops? The French stood by us throughout our development, even as our government foundered in chaos and an internal civil war broke out? Wasn't French participation in the Revolution limited to a few advisors like Lafayette for most of the war, and a Naval detachment at Yorktown? And didn't we build such a strong union with the British after we had established ourselves largely due to our shared opposition to the French?'

Posted by: Michael | May 20, 2007 8:53 PM

I did forget to mention that the American Revolution is also viewed as a primary cause of the French Revolution due to how it distracted the government and how it, combined with continuing war with Britain, drained the treasury and caused the government to collapse, I wonder if Gingrich is implying that we have that to look forward to as well...

Posted by: Michael | May 20, 2007 8:56 PM

And the conservative press is complaining about Carter's comments that this is the worst administration in the history of the country? Please, in my opinion, anyone who follows the news and takes the pulse of the nation and this administration's total ineptitude and sorry excuses for personnel and stupid decisions leading to untold pain and suffering for some but wealth and riches for others, Carter's comments are a 'no brainer' and right on target!

Posted by: grasspress | May 20, 2007 8:56 PM

Per Sarah Baxter's article in Timesonline, Gonzales is the last minion that the White House can throw to the lions. All thats left are Rove, Cheney, Dubya and Rice....
I understand that the millions of missing emails that Rove had to be kept from deleting are now in the hands of Mr. Luskin, Rove's attorney. I am sure that we can thank Alberto Gonzales for delivering those emails which were under subpeona out of the hands of American Justice and into the hands of Rove and his attorney's.
Sycophantic little rat, and a fine example of the NEOCON pattern of denial, obfuscation and redirection. Impeach them, indict them and hold them accountable.

Posted by: Nobody Knows | May 20, 2007 10:43 PM

If the Republicans had any guts they'd take the "Bushies" in hand and sanction all of them. For crying out loud....we are witnessing the destruction of the Party!

Posted by: MicroMandy | May 20, 2007 10:49 PM

Bush may, in fact, have been the best thing that has ever happened to the American political system. Through sheer ineptitude and transparent lying, he may have prevented the fascist takeover of government that his minions had groomed him for.

Posted by: Anonymous | May 20, 2007 10:55 PM

He has also singlehandedly [well, with a little help from Cheney and Rove] destroyed both the Republican Party and the Evangelical political movement. Thanks, George!

Posted by: thrh | May 20, 2007 11:00 PM

I mean it! It is hard to imagine anyone stupider than Jerry Falwell, but our boys Bush and Cheney have succeeded! Kudos!

Posted by: thrh | May 20, 2007 11:05 PM

Impeachment would be too kind. Better to let him, as Nixon put it, "twist slowly, slowly in the wind." His term is up soon, and things are not going to go better in the near future, no matter who is in power. Let events play out, as they will.

Besides, if we impeach Bush, we will have Cheney. La plus ca change, la plus c'est la meme chose!

Posted by: Tom | May 20, 2007 11:13 PM

Classified White House Memo
gonzo goes to the world bank wolfie takes over as attorney general

Posted by: domga | May 20, 2007 11:25 PM

Gonzo shares HIS President's contempt for Constitutional Law. The silence greeting their illegal behavior demonstrates how complacent we've grown as rogue cynics rend the fabric of our democracy.

Posted by: Lancelot | May 20, 2007 11:32 PM

I adore George Bush. He has a candid, Everyguy kind of warmth and approachability. He has done much to straighten out the sagging economy, to inspire us, and to charm us. He is a great guy, and history will one day show that he was a great President.

Posted by: Guru | May 20, 2007 11:40 PM

Bush is the best thing to happen to the Democrats in a long time!Without his stupidity and ineptitude they would still be on the outside looking in.

Posted by: walter_branch3 | May 21, 2007 12:52 AM

Bush is the best thing to happen to the Democrats in a long time!Without his stupidity and ineptitude they would still be on the outside looking in.

Posted by: walter_branch3 | May 21, 2007 12:52 AM

Re Gingrich's "14 years" comment: He was talking about the period from 1775 to the ratification of the Constitution in 1789. He was referring not only to the defeat of the British but also to the establishment of the new government.

That doesn't relieve the rest of the problems w/ his analogy, but it does mean that he wasn't totally clueless about the time span he was discussing.

Posted by: THS | May 21, 2007 1:55 AM

Bush, and Robert his defender on this forum, are desperately grasping at straws when they say that since Lincoln and Truman were unpopular at the end of their terms because of their wars, that history will vindicate Bush also. Well, LBJ was unpopular because of HIS war, and has he been vindicated? No. The Iraq War resembles the Vietnam War more than either the Civil War or the Korean War, and will be seen in a similar way.

Additionally, in looking at the Lincoln, Truman, or Johnson administrations, even the Nixon administration, you cannot find anything near the ill-informed arrogance, widespread contempt for the Constitution, lawbreaking among officials, continual lying, widespread corruption and massive incompetence of the Bush administration. Calling it the worst administration in history is an understatement; it occupies a hellish level of venality unimagined until now. The only positive thing it has done is make it unlikely a Republican will ever again be elected president while people who are adults now are still alive. It is amusing to watch the Republican candidates going through their monkey show in front of the extreme right, which is now again a distinct minority. 2008 is only the beginning. Bush has actually done some good for the country by destroying the sociopathic movement called neoconservativism. It will be a pleasure to watch them and the holy rollers go back to the wilderness they deserve to be in.

Posted by: Charles | May 21, 2007 2:07 AM

Here's the Democratic party's problem. They can vote any bill into law but Bush can also veto it. Without the votes to override the veto which the Republicans will not provide until it becomes politically necessary, it's just a endless cycle.

They could also try impeachment but here would be the problem...

"The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments. When sitting for that Purpose, they shall be on Oath or Affirmation. When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no Person shall be convicted without the Concurrence of two thirds of the Members present."

Do you think we could get that majority? Not unless Bush shot Nancy Pelosi on the front lawn of the White House with all of the Senate watching.

Posted by: Rachel | May 21, 2007 6:24 AM

Gonzales won't resign. The Boy King has no intention to dispense with the lackey who helps him and other members of the Administration break the law.

Moreover, Bush would be hard-pressed to find a candidate to the post of AG that would pass muster with Congress and would be confirmed. He would likely nominate another incompetent and dishonest puppet to the post, rather than a seasoned and honest law enforcer.

Posted by: Anonymous | May 21, 2007 8:17 AM

Hurting what Justice Department?

The thing that scares me about any sort of immigration law reform is that every few years they re-invent the same laws. Each time they work in amnesty and gravy parts for the illegal aliens. They are always quick to hand out the amnesty and gravy parts but they never do get around to the enforcement parts of the laws.

Do we really need a shiny new set of laws when we have never given the old comprehensive laws a test drive?


http://www.vdare.com/rubenstein/051101_nd.htm

Notices of intent to fine employers:

1997: 865
1999: 417
2000: 178
2001: 100
2003: 162
2004: 3


Worksite arrests of illegal alien workers:

1997: 17,554
1999: 2,849
2000: 953
2001: 735
2003: 445
2004: 159

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