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Posted at 8:03 AM ET, 01/17/2011

Where do Maryland, Virginia Tech and Georgetown stand today?

By Eric Prisbell

Here is a look at where the locals with the best at-large chances stand today:

Maryland
Record: 11-6
RPI: 91
SOS: 83
Vs. top 50: 0-6
Vs. top 100: 2-6
Best win: Penn State (57)
Worst loss: Boston College (35)
As of today: NIT
Comment: The Terrapins don't have a bad loss. But they also don't have a quality victory. Once again, they came up short against a respected opponent when they let a double-digit lead slip away against Villanova. Their 2-6 record against top 100 teams is ghastly. But that will improve through the course of the ACC season. After the Feb. 2 rematch against Duke, Maryland plays just three teams in the RPI top 50 - Boston College, North Carolina, Miami. All three games are on the road. Maryland faces an uphill climb to a bid, but don't count it out.

Virginia Tech
Record: 11-5
RPI: 73
SOS: 73
Vs. top 50: 1-4
Vs. top 100: 4-4
Best win: Oklahoma State (42)
Worst loss: Virginia (132)
As of today: 11 or 12 seed
Comment: The Hokies are in better position that the Terrapins, but they are playing short-handed. Down to eight scholarship players, they nearly knocked off North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Like Maryland, Virginia Tech has limited chances against quality opponents the rest of the way. It will play Boston College twice, Miami once and Duke once, as well. The Hokies will likely need to win a few of those games.

Georgetown
Record: 13-5
RPI: 8
SOS: 2
Vs. top 50: 3-5
Vs. top 100: 5-5
Best win: Old Dominion (31)
Worst loss: Temple (29)
As of today: 4 or 5 seed
Comment: Don't worry too much about the 2-4 conference record. Eleven Big East teams have reasonable chances at at-large berths, so anything close to a .500 league record will keep the Hoyas in the mix. They don't have a bad loss, and their RPI and schedule strength ranks among the nation's best. Here is the difference between the Big East and ACC: All but three of Georgetown's remaining opponents are strong NCAA tournament at-large candidates.

By Eric Prisbell  | January 17, 2011; 8:03 AM ET
 
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Next: NCAA tournament resume comparison

Comments

Eric, your analysis is right on the money. As much as I hate to say it, GT really benefits from the strength of the Big East and the Terps suffer from the weakness of the ACC. What has the world come to?

Posted by: petecard | January 18, 2011 11:24 AM | Report abuse

Thanks for the article, great summaries. One observation: Georgetown's best win was on the road against #13 Missouri (more so than the road wins at Old Dominion and Memphis).

Posted by: VerizonCenterResident | January 18, 2011 11:53 AM | Report abuse

Hey Gary,

Kevin Anderson is circling.

Posted by: rdondero123 | January 18, 2011 12:29 PM | Report abuse

What has the world come to?

Posted by: petecard | January 18, 2011 11:24 AM

It's come to whoring yourself out for football. Then having the football thing blow up in your face because Miami's now irrelevant and Virginia Tech can never win a big game. Rest in peace, noble ACC basketball conference.

Posted by: Kev29 | January 18, 2011 3:33 PM | Report abuse

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