The Checkout

Looking for a Job? Phishers Are Looking for You.

On Saturday, The Washington Post ran a story I wrote on a phishing scheme that targets job seekers who have posted their resumes on popular job sites such as Monster, Career Builder and Yahoo Hot Jobs.

This particular scam came with an Onion-esque flourish. One of the supposed employers, USAVoice.org, called itself "the world's fastest growing news organization," and lured aspiring journalists to give up personal information during the application prospect.

The news on the Web site, as one victim realized too late, doesn't update as often as, say CNN.com does, and consists of stories with timely headlines such as "A History of Valentines Day."

The scam came to the attention of the D.C. area Better Business Bureau because USA Voice uses a downtown Washington address, which turns out to be little more than a mail drop. A related site, Instant Human Resources, lists an address in Rockville, also a mail drop. Together, they've generated more than 8,000 inquiries since June.

While these particular Web sites are pretty slick, the phishing e-mails themselves are by no means the most sophisticated ever created. That honor, if you can call it that, belongs to the stream of official looking missives from financial firms, which are still the most popular ones to spoof among cyber criminals. After all, you're more likely to give up valuable financial info that way.

In that sense, the personal info that appears on job sites may not be as lucrative. But even a name, e-mail, address and telephone number are worth something to scammers. They can turn around and sell those or use them to perpetrate "synthetic identity theft," where a phony identity is created using bits of real people's information.

In this particular case, the success of the scam relied on a two-pronged strategy. Not only did they advertise on the job sites, but they also contacted people who used them.

Job seekers who posted their resumes on Monster, Career Builder and Yahoo received e-mails from either USA Voice or Instant Human Resources, telling them that based on the their resumes they qualified for a promising sounding position. Those who didn't smell a scam right away filled out online applications, in the process disclosing personal information.

Some get as far as entering a Social Security number. Many only get to name and address before backing out. At that point, job offers don't come pouring in, but spam does.

The job sites have gotten wise to these schemes and, for the past several years, have been posting warnings on their Web sites in an effort to educate users before it's too late. They also pre-screen job postings and monitor them daily. But it seems inevitable that scams will get through. Privacy expert Pam Dixon looked into how long USAVoice has been online; the site is about a year old. Most phishing sites don't stay up for a week. So this one seems to have staying power, despite having their job postings removed from Monster and Career Builder.

The job seekers I interviewed for this story who said they were scammed by USAVoice and Instant Human Resources were not naive Internet surfers by any means. One has made a living in technology. But their normal scam radar was blocked by their desire for employment, which is what makes this particular scam so effective--and so lame!

For tips on how to spot a phishing scam, check out Gina Hughes' tips.

Dixon's World Privacy Forum has advice just for job seekers.

washingtonpost.com's own Brian Krebs can also keep you up to date on the latest online security issues.

By Annys Shin |  February 12, 2007; 7:00 AM ET Privacy
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Comments

Please email us to report offensive comments.



Most of the "spam" on the bulletin boards I manage is now spammers posting profiles with these "job" listings as their home page, presumably to both get board members to click through and to raise their search ranking. It's definitely surpassed viagra and other drugs and even porn in my little corner of the Internet.

Posted by: The Cosmic Avenger | February 12, 2007 11:27 AM

I am sometimes amused and sometimes annoyed at how many phising attempts I get on my work e-mail from firms that either (1) I never used my work e-mail address for or (2) have never had any involvement with at all.

I'm amazed that people fall for the scams, but obviously they do.

Very simple protection that always works: Never click on links in e-mail or fill out forms e-mailed to you, no matter how official they look. If you really think it's at all possible the e-mail might be legit, go to the web site (from your own link or type in the address, not from a link e-mailed to you) and check your account there. Or better yet, call the company.

Posted by: SteveG | February 12, 2007 11:45 AM

I found a really good way to stop all of this phishing.

If you would like me to monitor your personal information and stop all phishing please send me your name, Birthdate, Social Security Number, and a major credit card number with expiration date.

Unfortunately I will be unable to use your major credit card number to charge for this service but you can wire me the money via Western Union.

Send it to my Caiman Islands account, attention to: U.B. Screwed (I am on business travel for a while).

Posted by: SoMD | February 12, 2007 12:00 PM

Seems like this is a topic that is covered a lot here. You can go back through Annys's articles and see the same things discussed in several of them.
Many of the safe safeguards that were listed in today article were covered in postings of her other articles.

Time to change it up a bit Annys.

Posted by: Mike C | February 12, 2007 1:28 PM

Thank you for your giving attention to this scam in this major news outlet. I'd say, start digging even deeper, Annys.

As you may know, since two and a half years I have reported about this long running phishing operation on my site and on some boards (mainly scam.com).

I have gathered tons of information, including evidence to be eventally helpful in nailing this scam gang.

As you may have noticed, several of the scam.com threads already have been deleted. More Scam.com threads about Alec Defrawy scams with possibly vital information are going to be deleted. The names of the mob's CEO, Ayman Ahemed el Difrawy, aka Alec Defrawy, aka Alex Simon / Alex Siman aka David Katz aka you name it, are now auto-replaced by ******.

At the same time, on behalf of their obviously moronic "Members", known criminal spammers William L. (Bill) Stanley and Robert Russo (now calling themselves the Defamation Action League) are harassing RipoffReport.com owner Ed Magedson by targeting his hosting companies. Attacking them with ddos attacks, inundating them with phone calls clogging up their lines. Threatening family members, also jam their phone lines and post things about (googleslander) their family on the Internet, telling them: this will not go away unless you take down RipoffReport.com. The viagra mobsters are venting their achievements, threats and googleslander unhindered on Scam.com.

At the same time Louis J. Pearlman is going down hard. Lou got sued for big time fraud and he is being fully investigated by Florida state. Alec Defrawy was a paid consultant of Relief Defendants Trans Continental Talent and Fashion Rock LLC.

No coincidence.

Posted by: Klaas de Vries Jr | February 13, 2007 7:51 PM

Meanwhile, still in Google Adwords... El Difrawi's

Instant Human Resources
Want to know the truth about IHR? Find out the real story.
thetruthinstanthumanresources.com

Instant Human Resources
Want to know what IHR is? Then check out this special report.
www.whatisinstanthumanresources.com

InstantHR Facts
Need to know about InstantHR? Then find out the real truth here.
factsaboutinstanthumanresources.com

Sponsored Links The Truth About USAVoice
Want to know about USAVoice? Then find the truth here
www.thetruthaboutusavoice.com

What is USAVoice?
Curious about USAVoice? Then read this special report.
www.whatisusavoice.com

Facts About USAVoice.
Want to know all about USAVoice? Find the people behind it here.
www.factsaboutusavoice.com

Truth About TooSpoiled
Want to know the truth? Then find out here.
www.thetruthabouttoospoiled.com

Facts About TooSpoiled?
Looking for info on TooSpoiled? Find out who's behind it here.
www.factsabouttoospoiled.com

What is TooSpoiled?
Want to know about TooSpoiled? Then read on.
www.whatistoospoiled.com

And what about Ask America, Good Grade Zone, Kasamba Careers, Administrative Solutions Group, Internet Solutions Corp?

Posted by: Klaas de Vries Jr | February 13, 2007 8:38 PM

I sure wish I had found this site first. I JUST filled out the app online last night. (found a job posting on Monster or CareerBuilder) UGH! I was so into job searching that I didn't really take the time to research the companies. - Live & learn.

Posted by: Stacey | February 14, 2007 9:34 AM

Just reported: USA Voice is changing names to World Voice.

Domains www.worldvoicenews.com, www.worldvoicenews.org and www.worldvoicenews.net were registered a week ago, as usual by infamous 'WebDesigners'.

Posted by: Klaas de Vries Jr | February 14, 2007 3:25 PM

Tenntrips.com webmaster just sent me this. Thanks!

Quote:
"Worldvoicenews.com just sent me an e-mail with a job offer. Strange thing is searching for them on google shows two VERY similar disclaimer pages that were used with toospoiled.
http://www.thetruthaboutworldvoice.com etc... The are exactly like the ones used with toospoiled talking about bloggers etc. talking bad about them. Funny thing is there aren't any blogs or bad pages about them YET......"

Yeah, lol.

Sponsored Links
WorldVoice Facts
Need to know about WorldVoice? Then find out the real truth here.
www.factsaboutworldvoice.com

WorldVoice
The truth about WorldVoice Find out the real story.
www.thetruthaboutworldvoice.com

What is WorldVoice?
Who's behind WorldVoice? Check out this special report.
www.whatisworldvoice.com

Posted by: Klaas de Vries Jr | February 16, 2007 5:58 AM

Here's the interesting thing about USAVoice. Not one person here has actually attempted to check them out. Everyone here, including the reporter, instantly believes the sites that spew negative things, however, nobody seems to realize that those types of sites are notoriously inaccurate. I filled out an application with them, and have been going through their application process over the last week and a half, and have received an offer letter (something that wholly contradicts a statement in this article). I have participated in training. I have received zero spam from them and the spam I do receive has neither changed in form, nor in the addresses it comes from, nor in the number of spams received per day.

I find it sad that in today's world, people are ready to believe the worst about an organization just because a so-called reporter that did a lousy job of investigating the story in the first place said it's true.

In truth, Annys Shin and the Washington Post owe USAVoice a retraction and an apology.

Posted by: Dawn | February 16, 2007 9:07 PM

Here's the interesting thing about USAVoice. Not one person here has actually attempted to check them out. Everyone here, including the reporter, instantly believes the sites that spew negative things, however, nobody seems to realize that those types of sites are notoriously inaccurate. I filled out an application with them, and have been going through their application process over the last week and a half, and have received an offer letter (something that wholly contradicts a statement in this article). I have participated in training. I have received zero spam from them and the spam I do receive has neither changed in form, nor in the addresses it comes from, nor in the number of spams received per day.

I find it sad that in today's world, people are ready to believe the worst about an organization just because a so-called reporter that did a lousy job of investigating the story in the first place said it's true.

In truth, Annys Shin and the Washington Post owe USAVoice a retraction and an apology.

Posted by: Dawn | February 16, 2007 9:11 PM

"Not one person here has actually attempted to check them out." Apparently Monster, Careerbuilder and Hotjobs did, "Dawn". Perhaps USA Voice (xcuse me World Voice) CEO mr. Siman aka Alec Defrawy better sue them all for defamation, lol.

Posted by: Klaas de Vries Jr | February 17, 2007 2:11 PM

Posted by: Klaas de Vries Jr | February 17, 2007 3:12 PM

Dawn, when you get an actual paycheck from USA Voice, or World Voice, or whatever they have been calling themselves that week, let us know. You'll be the first. You're naive to think a Washington Post reporter just regurgitated something she read on a Web site. That's what USA Voice "reporters" do.

Posted by: Derby | February 21, 2007 10:36 AM

I have to say that the world voice scam has a well written cover letter. $30 an hour to work at home was amusing. When I entered "world voice" and the "scam" i got 100 hits...eeek.

Posted by: Joe | February 21, 2007 4:00 PM

I just noticed the wordpress blog posting by "Michael Fomkin" has been removed. Still on worldvoicenews.com though. For you to avoid having to subscribe (give name, address, phone number, email) and end up in Defrawy's spam database, here is a copy of the complete content of the USA Voice article: CONNED! - WorldVoice Responds to Washington Post Article. Story by World Voice Investigative (whoever that may be).

[quote]

Saturday, February 17th, 2007...12:22 pm
CONNED! - WorldVoice Responds to Washington Post Article

Conned!!

From - www.worldvoicenews.com

How does an internet extortionist, operating from an hidden location in Eastern Europe (Russia), get The Washington Post, a respected and trusted news organization, to publish a completely false story that assists him in his extortion scheme?

While the premise may seem far-fetched, that is exactly what happened. Along the way the extortionist was actually able to gain the unintended support of a Yahoo company as well as that of the Better Business Bureau.

How could this happen? To get a better understanding of just how the extortionist was able to accomplish his goals, one must have an understanding of the background of the companies targeted by this malicious extortionist.

Instant Human Resources

Instant Human Resources (IHR), which is a sister company of WorldVoiceNews.com, launched its Beta site in October of 2005. IHR is a job-posting site that boasts higher security features than can normally be found on Internet job posting sites. Through IHR, applicants have the ability to post their resumes much like they can on many other employment sites.

The distinguishable difference between these sites and IHR is the extra level of security provided by their system. Employers searching through resumes do not have access to your last name, phone number, address or email information. Employers can contact applicants through the IHR network only, thereby limiting the amount of your private information that employers have access to.

This higher security level protects applicants from receiving the amounts of spam that are associated with other current job boards. IHR launched in 2005 as a site free to both applicants and employers and since that time has registered more than 20,000 employers and more than One Million job seekers. Employers who are registered with IHR include:

UPS Coca-Cola

Pepsi-Cola The Limited

EBay Texas Instruments

Morgan & Chase McDonalds

Midas Lord & Taylor

JC Penny Hilton

General Electric Aflac

All State AOL

USAVoice

USAVoice (now WorldVoiceNews.com) is an online news site that utilizes average people to report the news as seen through their eyes. USAVoice's motto of Honest and Unfiltered news is based on the premise that USAVoice allows the average person to post their views without being filtered through a biased editorial process. USAVoice's unique model of giving their reporters a percentage of the ad revenue that they generate has allowed them to become one of the fastest growing online news services with thousands of reporters currently hired.

E-Mail from an Extortionist
Shortly after going live USAVoice received the following e-mail.

Dear Sirs, I noticed a site has gone on the Internet http://www.klaasdevriesjr.com/ (sic) that has some very negative information about your organization. You should be aware that this site will cause your organization great harm. Many customers and potential employees will be scared of by reading this information. You should also be aware that people seeing this site will complain and may cause your company negative publicity or even legal investigations.

I specialize in having such websites removed. For a consulting fee of $50,000US and a monthly maintenance fee of $5,000US I will insure that this website is removed. I do not disclose my tactics but I assure you that you will never have to fear this website as long as the monthly payments are made in a timely manner.

I wish to re-iterate that I am a consultant only and that I am in no way involved with the aforementioned website. I am also willing to prove I can deliver as promised. If you wish to retain my services I will prove my value by making the website disappear for 1 day prior to you forwarding my initial payment. Because my work is extremely sensitive I will only communicate with you via email and we will never meet or speak.

Ivan Manteca*

Clearly this email was an attempted extortion threat.

The website referenced in the email contained malicious, slanderous and false information, calling both IHR and USAVoice a criminal phishing scheme designed to gain people's information for identity theft and other illegal purposes.

References were made that both companies were tied to Organized crime. All of these allegations were completely baseless.

Not surprisingly, after investigation, the website was found to have no contact information and was located overseas. (www.klaasdevriesjr.com **) When USAVoice inquired further, they were instructed to wire the requested funds to a bank account traced to Russia.

The Scheme Heats Up
Not intending to bow to the unjustified pressures of an obvious extortion attempt, USAVoice refused to wire the money. As a result of USAVoice's refusal to pay the extortionist, his malicious web site was updated urging potential employers and applicants to file complaints about the alleged phishing scheme. Using search engine optimization techniques, which focus on key words input by users through search engines, Ivan Manteca was able to place his site prominently on the Google results page whenever a search for IHR or USAVoice was conducted.

Ivan then urged viewers of his site to post complaints on message boards, file complaints with local, state, and Federal Governments, send complaints to the Better Business Bureau and even contact media sources with their concerns.

The plan worked flawlessly.

First, concerned viewers, spurred on by the inaccuracies on Ivan's site, filed complaints on posting boards such as scam.com. Some complaints actually thanked the extortionist's website for saving them from becoming a victim of identity theft or a phishing operation. The more that people expressed their concerns the more legitimate the threat seemed.

Job Boards are named next target.

Soon after, USAVoice began advertising for reporters on popular job boards such as Hot Jobs and others. Ivan then began directing visitors to his site to file complaints that the jobs that were being offered were in fact fraudulent and that no reporter position was available.

Because job boards are extremely sensitive to organizations attempting to obtain job seeker information for illicit purposes, Hot Jobs erred on the side of caution and removed the jobs without any attempt to validate whether the complaints were legitimate.


Better Business Bureau is unwittingly implicated
Although most people consider the Better Business Bureau to be a Government agency, the fact is that the Better Business Bureau is a private franchised operation. Each Better Business Bureau franchise earns revenue by selling memberships to businesses in their local community. When the Better Business Bureau receives a complaint they send the information to the company and wait for their response. If the company chooses not to respond to another private business such as the Better Business Bureau, it simply assumes the complaint is valid on its face.

The Better Business Bureau doesn't attempt to verify whether or not there is any factual basis for the complaint or even if the individual complaining actually exists. In this case, Ivan's website urged viewers to file complaints with the Better Business Bureau. Since IHR was a free site that was in Beta testing it did not offer any direct customer service and relied on user moderators to maintain the site, thus the Better Business Bureau's complaints went unanswered.

Always looking for an opportunity to get free publicity, the Better Business Bureau is constantly feeding information to local and national media in attempts to solidify their standing to consumers.

Washington Post Duped

To completely validate the scheme and make good on the threats in his email, Ivan Manteca needed a legitimate media organization to take the bait. The Better Business Bureau, always in search of publicity, contacted the Washington Post to promote this alleged phishing scheme.

But how would the Washington Post, an institution that is practically synonymous with accuracy and integrity be duped so easily?

The Washington Post relied on the following:

1. The presumed credibility of the Better Business Bureau

2. The fact that Hot Jobs and other job boards had removed the job postings

3. IHR did not respond immediately to calls by the Washington Post reporter

Amazingly, the Washington Post printed a story (see copy of story here.) on Saturday, February 10th, 2007 making the following allegations:

1. That USAVoice and IHR are phishing sites used to conduct Identity Theft

2. That USAVoice and IHR are phishing sites used to collect email addresses for purposes of spamming applicants

3. That Internet Solutions, USAVoice and IHR's parent company is a phishing site asking applicants to post Social Security numbers for the purposes of conducting Identity theft

4. That USAVoice had low quality writing

Is the Washington Post to Blame?
With hindsight being 20/20, can the Washington Post actually be free from blame for posting the erroneous story? Did they actually report fairly with the information they had? The answer to both is "no".

Even though IHR and WorldVoice did not respond, the Washington Post with only a small amount of due diligence would have realized that the information posted was incorrect.

In the story, the Washington Post essentially made four allegations.

1. That IHR and USAVoice were a phishing operation that lured job seekers into providing Social Security Numbers and other private and personal information for the purpose of identity theft

2. That IHR and USAVoice were a spam organization luring job seekers in to apply for jobs for the explicit purpose of sending them spam emails.

3. That Internet Solutions, USAVoice and IHR's parent company is a phishing site asking applicants to post Social Security numbers for the purposes of conducting Identity theft

4. That USAVoice had low quality writing

With just a little research and a bit of common sense all of these allegations are easily refuted.

Allegation # 1

That IHR and USAVoice were a phishing operation that lured job seekers into providing Social Security Numbers and other private and personal information for the purpose of identity theft.

This allegation is not credible for several reasons.

1. In the Washington Post article, it was reported that Hot Jobs had taken the jobs down after eight months. Phishing operations that are stealing identity never last for 8 months. Typically, phishing operators are hit and run organizations that operate for just a few hours.

2. An examination of all complaints sent to the Better Business Bureau and even on posting boards showed no evidence of anyone complaining that they had suffered from identity theft. If an operation had actually been committing identity theft for 8 months as reported there would have been numerous complaints as identity theft is something people are constantly on the look out for.

3. By simply reviewing the application process personally, the reporter would have identified that the two crucial pieces needed in identity theft, social security numbers and date of birth, are simply not asked for.

Allegation # 2

That IHR and USAVoice were a spam organization luring job seekers in to apply for jobs for the explicit purpose of sending them spam emails.


This allegation is not credible for several reasons.

1. In the Washington Post article, the allegation was that USAVoice and IHR purchased licenses with job boards for the purpose of accessing job seeker resumes. USAVoice and IHR would then send emails to potential job seekers enticing them to fill out an application for the purpose of gaining information that would then be used spam the job seekers.

2. This argument simply does not stand up to scrutiny because there would be no reason to send the initial email. The application on IHR and USAVoice only asks for information that would already be on the job seekers resume. So, if IHR and USAVoice's intent was to send spam, they would simply access the resume and send the spam directly.

Allegation # 3

That Internet Solutions, USAVoice and IHR's parent company is a phishing site asking applicants to post Social Security numbers for the purposes of conducting Identity theft.

This allegation is revealed as false simply by visiting the Internet Solutions web site.

1. Internet solutions website only offers a email link for those who are wishing to inquire about employment and does not provide an application form on its site.

2. The Internet Solutions web site does not solicit any Social Security information in any way.

Allegation # 4 That USAVoice has low quality writing.

This allegation is clearly baseless.

USAVoice, one of the fastest growing news organizations in the nation, employs thousands of quality reporters who provide content through a completely unbiased editorial process as seen through the eyes of the average person. USAVoice content is truthful, unbiased and well researched, providing its readership with accurate and meaningful news. When asked of their response to this allegation, the USAVoice team was flooded with comments and notes of support from the reporters who give USAVoice its true "voice".

"I believe that the media in America tends NOT to hear the voices of the average American on the street. I believe my liberal Democrat voice reflects about 1/2 of the mainstream American view of things. I have been lucky, I was against the war in Iraq before it started and was proven right. I am often ahead of the curve. I believed in the beginning that USA Voice was on the cutting edge of the future of journalism and still do." - Richard Payne, CO., Political Reporter

"I became a reporter for VOICE because I love being able to give an opinion that may help someone. I love being nosey and making sure people know the truth. I chose dating advice because I've gained a lot of knowledge over the years and I love sharing my opinions with others. I love getting feedback from my readers about whether they agree or disagree. I have so much inside me I want to say and its nice to be able to get it out. " - Monique B - Dating Advice Columnist

"I have always written. In good times and bad I have tried to put down on paper how I felt at the time. Poetry and short stories are my forte but I love to write all kinds of things. In High School I wrote for the H.S. newsletter and yearbook, in College, at Rutgers University, I wrote for the College newspaper, The Rutgers Targum. I am constantly looking for new ways to grow and express myself." - Lori Stone, MD

"I am an early childhood educator and entertainer. I am full of ideas and helpful advice to encourage parents to find the fun in raising their young ones. My writings place a lot of emphasis in educating parents on their important role as their child's first teacher!" - Lori Reeves, MS

"I became a reporter for the USA Voice because I have always wanted to be a writer. I have been writing poems and short stories since I was a child. I was published in high school and soon after I won the school poetry contest. This fueled my desire to become a writer even more so. It is my passion, the one place I can express myself. I will be writing until the day that I die and I figured why not get paid for what I already do in my spare time? Then I got an email from someone at the site and I decided to apply." - Jessica Mann, CA

"As a recent graduate of Kaplan University where my coursework entailed extensive writing assignments, I found that I not only enjoy writing but also get my intended points across. To make a difference in important matters that need to be addressed, one needs to not only write about the issues but get their point across. Being a reporter for World Voice is an excellent opportunity for me to put my 2 years of coursework into action by writing on issues such as Criminal, Civil, and Family law issues the public needs to read about." - Jeffrey Struck - MA

"When I entered the Carroll School of Management at Boston College in 2003 to get my MBA I decided that I would also try to do some writing. This is when I became the lead reporter as well as Editor for The Graduate (the newspaper for the Carroll School of Management). I had a blast reporting for the Carroll School and rediscovered my passion. Writing for the Voice gives me the opportunity to keep my mind active by writing and I am also looking forward to receiving some monetary compensation for my work. I am sending links to my articles to family and friends and everyone is happy that I am writing once again." - Ben Fawcett - MA

"I have been writing for 30 years, and I just got my book published, I am ensconced in the movie industry, and am very excited about covering events for USA VOICE. I have published my own magazine and am looking forward to getting my work broadcast around the globe." - Steven Barber - Santa Monica, CA

"For as long as I can remember I always wanted to be a reporter or a sports reporter, I was the editor for my school news paper. I feel that world voice is my opportunity to get back to my first love sports reporting." - Adrian Bennett, NY

"My passion for writing began in high school when as a junior I joined the yearbook staff. I carried my interest in print journalism to college as I initiated my studies at Florida International University. Now on my last semester at the school, I intern at the Miami Herald Neighbors section as a way to advance my interests in the field. My ultimate goal is to explore the culture of South Florida, a topic that amazes me." - Gisele Gomes, FL


An Extortionist is further armed
Within hours of the Washington Post article appearing, Ivan posted the story on his website as an attempt to validate his extortion scheme.

In next week's conclusion, we will discuss how companies can avoid falling victim to similar schemes.

*Ivan Manteca is not the real name used in the extortion letter.

** this is a copy of the site, not the original. WorldVoice chose to portray a copy, removing defamatory information about unrelated companies and not to give traffic to the actual extortion site.

[/quote]


Wow, so good old Klaas from Oosterpoort wijk in Grunn now turns out to be a Russian mobster with a Southamerican name, if my interpretation is correct. Quite an interesting approach, could be a great B-movie script, hehe.

The USA Voice contributor's recommendations I find most saddening, knowing these people's trust is being cruely abused.

Seems to me the writer's intention also is to lure the Washington Post into perhaps making unfunded allegations.

Defrawy's constantly spreading mis-information and hiding-behind is aimed one thing: getting away with it, if it ever would come to a jury trial.

He might succeed.

Posted by: Klaas de Vries Jr | February 21, 2007 11:38 PM

Klass who is posting this is trying to blackmail me for 50k. It wont work Klass!

Posted by: Alec Defrawi | February 22, 2007 10:41 AM

50k only?? Let's make it a C-movie script then.

Posted by: Klaas de Vries Jr | February 22, 2007 1:55 PM

At least you admitted it finally, you will pay for your crimes Klaas. It is Karma.

Posted by: Alec | February 24, 2007 7:34 AM

No Alec, It's called sarcasm. Your only aiming at the most gullible with your lying scams makes you as dumb as your moronic followers.

Posted by: Klaas de Vries jr | February 25, 2007 11:09 AM

I just accepted a sales position with World Voice. From everything I had done up until this week this has been a wonderful experience. Now I've discovered your story and the referenced websites regarding scam and pfisching. Thanks.

If this really was the opportunity I have been looking for and you've screwed it up for me I really appreciate it. You've blessed me beyond measure. Not!!!

If this really is a scam then thank you for real. Time will tell. But I will keep researching until I find out the truth for myself.

Posted by: Lanny Porter | February 28, 2007 11:07 PM

Annys, for your information. Make an inquiry with Hotjobs and see how fast they remove these 47 job ads Defrawy placed yesterday for Amateur Poker Tour.

http://hotjobs.yahoo.com/careers-58795-Amateur_Poker_Tour;_ylt=ArwT6hXMKtVCAz_r8BmMtU2mRKIX

I assume the spam format will be about the same as for this example:

[quote]
Amateur Poker is a company that has made a big splash by organizing and producing local, non-gambling poker tournaments to benefit charitable and non-profit organizations as well as to increase the flow of customers at clubs, taverns, and other public establishments.

Our company is seeking Dealers in your area to work at these tournaments. Dealers will have to have extensive knowledge of the rules of many different types of poker games (including Texas Hold Em, stud, draw, and three card) and the ability to make the players at the table enjoy the game. Dealers may choose to work full or part time and are eligible for the following compensation package:

The ability to earn $200-$400 per night
Medical & Dental Plan
Paid Vacations
Rapid Advancement Opportunities
If you enjoy gaming and have or want to gain experience as a Dealer, here is the perfect opportunity for you.

To apply for the Dealer position, visit the link below and fill out the online application. (If the link does not work in your e-mail you may copy and paste the address in your browser.)

http://www.amateurpokertourusa.com/registration/applications/one

[/quote]

Posted by: Klaas de Vries Jr | March 2, 2007 5:29 AM

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