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White House Cheat Sheet: Obama Beloved, Policies Be-Liked



President Obama's personal approval ratings are not matched by the ones for his policies.

President Obama enters his second 100 days in office riding a wave of likability but potentially plagued by an undercurrent of dissatisfaction with the policies he has put in place.

The latest NBC/Wall Street Journal poll paints this chasm in sharp relief; 51 percent of Americans both like Obama personally and approve of his policies while 30 percent like him personally but disapprove of his policies.

On the one hand, more than eight in ten Americans feel warmly toward Obama, suggesting he has a deep reservoir of personal likability and will continue to tap it in order to sell his agenda to the country.

On the other, the fact that three in ten like Obama but dislike his policies could well portend a much more difficult political environment for the president over the next 100 days than he dealt with in the first 100 days.

How big an issue is the chasm between Obama's personal favorability and the approval of his policies?

"It poses a significant challenge for Obama to turn the 'hope' voters have for his success into 'results,'" explained Republican pollster Neil Newhouse of Public Opinion Strategies. "The more stark the gap between those two, the more his programs are at risk."

Mark Penn, a Democratic pollster who handled survey research for Hillary Rodham Clinton's presidential campaign said that the data is a reflection that "people are comfortable with Obama's leadership style but remain uncertain about his policies, especially the potential deficits."

Republicans have gone hard after the idea that all of Obama's spending in the first 100 days will come home to roost at some point in the not-too-distant future, and there is some evidence that the American public remains concerned about government spending too much, too fast.

In the latest Washington Post/ABC News poll, nearly nine in ten Americans (87 percent) said they were either "very" (59 percent) or "somewhat" (27 percent) concerned about the size of the federal budget deficit -- numbers that have held steady in Post polling since December 2008.

Asked in the NBC/WSJ poll whether the budget deficit was a "real and important number" with a direct effect on the average citizen or a "bookkeeping and governmental number" with little impact, 68 percent agreed with the former statement and 27 percent with the latter.

Obama and his senior aides are well aware of the dangers inherent in the massive government spending they have instituted in response the economic crisis gripping the country.

It's why Obama regularly speaks of "bending the curve" on spending once the economic crisis passes, why he asked his Cabinet to cut $100 million from their combined budgets, and why he devoted the whole of last weekend's radio/You Tube address to touting the need for fiscal discipline.

"The cost of confronting our economic crisis is high," acknowledged Obama. "But we can't settle for a future of rising deficits and debt that our children can't pay."

(Obama trotted out similar rhetoric during his town hall meeting in Missouri on Wednesday -- and received a smack down from the Associated Press for his trouble.)

What then do the next 100 days hold for Obama?

The American public has "given him the football and they are waiting to see how far he gets down the field and how successful his policies are to decide whether to let him keep going or pull him back," argued Penn.

The key question: Will Obama continue to matriculate the ball down the field or fumble the pigskin?

What To Watch For:

Thursday's Fix Picks: Remember when the Atari 2600 was the coolest thing going?

1. President Obama's budget passes.
2. It may be day 101 of the Obama administration but the Scott Wilson's 100 days piece is still terrific.
3. Things aren't getting better for Jack Murtha.
4. Lincoln Chafee's in the Rhode Island governor's race. Or not.
5. Fix snubbed -- again! -- on People's 100 most beautiful people list.

Republicans Form "National Council For a New America": A group of House and Senate Republican leaders -- led by House Minority Whip Eric Cantor (Va.) but also including Sen. John McCain (Ariz.), Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.), Rep. Mike Pence (Ind.) and Sen. John Thune (S.D.) among others -- are forming a group aimed at re-branding the Republican party through a series of town hall meetings and other policy-driven activities. "The goal is to have a national conversation where we use Republican principles as a prism to ask people how best to handle the challenges and opportunities facing them," explained Rob Collins, Cantor's chief of staff. The group, which is known as the National Council For A New America, is holding its first event this Saturday in northern Virginia -- featuring former Govs. Jeb Bush (Fla.) and Mitt Romney (Mass.). Other prominent Republicans likely to be involved in future events include Govs. Bobby Jindal (La.) and Haley Barbour (Miss.). The formation of the National Council is best understood as a recognition by the establishment wing of the party that without a significant re-branding between now and 2012, President Obama will walk to re-election. Whether anything real comes out of these efforts remains to be seen but they are a step in the right direction.

2012 Like It's Tomorrow: The party switch by Sen. Arlen Specter (D-Pa.) evoked widely divergent reactions from the Republican politicians mentioned as potential 2012 candidates. South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford strongly condemned the move, telling the Fix: "The real news would be if he had announced he was now going to act like a Republican.... It's this kind of soulless pragmatism that turns people off to politics and helps perpetuate a ruling class more loyal to themselves than to the people who elected them." Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (Ga.) called the move an act of "personal survival," adding: "This defection will make the 2010 and 2012 elections an even clearer choice of two directions for America." Former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney was far more measured; "Mitt Romney's PAC will be working to elect a Republican to that seat in 2010," said spokesman Eric Fehnstrom. Neither Gov. Tim Pawlenty (Minn) nor Gov. Bobby Jindal offered any formal statement on Specter's move. The reaction to the Specter switch is indicative of the broader divide within the party between conservative true believers (Sanford, Gingrich) and the more pragmatic, mainstream candidates (Romney, Pawlenty). It's a fight that will continue to manifest itself in a variety of ways in the run up to the 2012 nomination fight.

Bayh in Strong Shape in 2010: A new poll conducted by Dave Beattie (of Hamilton Campaigns) for Sen. Evan Bayh suggests little reason for concern as the Indiana Democrat looks toward a race for third term in 2010. Nearly three-quarters (74 percent) of Indiana voters see Bayh in a favorable light while just 23 percent view him unfavorably. Bayh's favorability ratings are high across party lines with 74 percent of Independents and 61 percent of Republicans viewing him in a positive light. Republicans made some noise about challenging Bayh earlier this year but that talk has largely faded amid glowing poll numbers (like these) and the Democratic incumbent's massive campaign warchest ($11.4 million on hand at the end of March). The only Republican who might give Bayh a serious race is Gov. Mitch Daniels (R) and he has already pledged not to run again for public office. (Worth noting: the poll also showed very strong numbers for President Obama -- 61 percent of Indiana voters had a favorable opinion of him as compared to 38 percent who felt unfavorably.)

Thune, Olsen Hoop It Up: Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.) and Texas Rep. Pete Olsen held a fundraiser last night at the L.A. Sports Club in Washington. Yes, you read that right. The event was in the form of a basketball game between "Team Thune" and "Team Olsen" with the proceeds benefiting the Texas freshman Republican. (Thune doesn't really need the money; he had $4.4 million in the bank at the end of last month.) Thune is a renowned hoopster, having played for the Biblical Institute of Los Angeles (BIOLA) in his college days and standing 6'5". Olsen is no slouch himself, having played for a year on Rice University's basketball team.

Van Hollen Warns Members on Complacency: Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Chairman Chris Van Hollen issued a warning to his caucus this week in the form of a memo noting the long historical odds the party faces in 2010. "History shows that we can do everything right and still lose seats," wrote Van Hollen in a document distributed to the Democratic caucus, adding that only twice since Abraham Lincoln's victory has the president's party picked up seats in the first midterm election. Van Hollen also took note of Republicans' current cash position (+$23 million net as compared to Democrats' -$5.5 million) and asserts that "it is clear that the Republicans will have the resources they need to compete." He added -- continuing a theme from the 2008 election -- that Republican interest groups are certain to spend heavily on races next November. Reading this memo might make one think that Democrats are on the verge of losing their hold on the majority in 2010; the truth is quite different but Van Hollen knows the road from majority to minority status is a slippery slope.

Best iPhone Apps: Three the easy way (as opposed to three the hard way) -- Camerabag, Byline and Oregon Trail (YES!).

Say What?: "We got rid of some dead weight." -- Conservative talk radio host Rush Limbaugh on Sen. Arlen Specter's (D-Pa.) party switch.

By Chris Cillizza  |  April 30, 2009; 6:00 AM ET
Categories:  Cheat Sheet Share This:  E-Mail | Technorati | Del.icio.us | Digg | Stumble Previous: Obama's 100 Days Presser: First Thoughts
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Comments

Why is is that anything that doesn't go Obama's way is always Fox News' fault?

Did Fox News really urge all their viewers to go to a competitior's website and assign the President of the United States an 'F' rating? Can someone provide proof of the assertion made by 'ohmyobama'.

I know that Fox News and MSNBC are engaged in an ongoing feud and both get a bit carried away but if true this represents a new low.

I think the truth is that Obama is simply very polarizing. While he is the darling of the left, he is increasingly disliked by the right and if he isn't careful with his agenda, he could lose the independents that enabled his election and relegate himself to one-termer status.

Posted by: Ci2Eye | May 1, 2009 10:11 PM | Report abuse

Ummm... Chris.... the NBC poll showed that ONLY 12% disapproved of Obama's performance. When you take the 51% that approved of him and his policies, and the 30% that approved of him, but not his policies, it shows an enormous well of good will. Oh, and FraudObama, you putz, the MSNBC poll has been corrupted by the Fox News minions ... Fox News has been drumming up people to go to the site to give an "F". I'd prefer to read real polls rather than the results of these shillsters.

Posted by: Omyobama | May 1, 2009 1:07 AM | Report abuse

Hey brainless joe. Obambi has the lowest rating except the philandering willie in 40 years. So sad to rain on the lib parade.

Posted by: king_of_zouk | April 30, 2009 8:19 PM | Report abuse

The GOP's latest anti-BHO hate video (courtesy of HuffPo). It is too silly.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/04/30/house-gop-obama-ad-aims-t_n_193807.html

Posted by: broadwayjoe | April 30, 2009 7:53 PM | Report abuse

Uh Oh!

MSNBC Poll...Barry's First 100 Days Grade:

A - 32%

F - 39%

347K total votes

Say it ain't so, Barry! And MSNBC of all things. His bastion of Liberal hate mongers.


Posted by: FraudObama | April 30, 2009 11:51 AM
_______
That was an INTERNET poll which by definition is INVALID. (Remember all of Drudge's internet polls said BHO was going to lose the election by 30 points.)

The most recent scientific poll was done by the Washington Post and it shows 81 percent of Americans like BHO. BHO's approvals are at close to 70 percent (see Daily Kos for example) in many other polls.
______

The GOP (now only 21 percent of the electorate) still does not realize foolish mudslinging (he's a socialist, fascist, Muslim terrorist) will not work on 44. Their latest ad features what they think is a sure winner: pictures Bill Ayers and Hugo Chavez. Fox News only tried the Ayers attack, uh, about 541 times. Who knows, maybe the 542nd will be the charm.

P.S.: BTW, good post, scrivener50. Welcome to the real world again...

Posted by: broadwayjoe | April 30, 2009 7:32 PM | Report abuse

drivl and civil conversation in the same sentence. Now that's an oxymoron. As opposed to a liberal moron - drivl solo.

Posted by: king_of_zouk | April 30, 2009 7:21 PM | Report abuse

Whoa Drindl--your 10:43 AM posting was right on. Personally I am in thrall to BHO but stuck down here in the land of cotton where no liberal vote will be forgotton. Yup surrounded by screaming pig-stickers who could not carry on a civil conversation if you threatened to take their cornpone away.

Posted by: rawreid | April 30, 2009 6:29 PM | Report abuse

Wait a minute.. name some politicians who are not in nutcase territory.. let's be fair..

Posted by: newbeeboy | April 30, 2009 3:27 PM | Report abuse

"The goal is to have a national conversation where we use Republican principles as a prism to ask people how best to handle the challenges and opportunities facing them," explained Rob Collins, Cantor's chief of staff.

----

As long we look at people's challenges and opportunities through a party "prism", instead of listening to them, the view will continue to be bent and distorted. If you want to truly understand the "national conversation", try taking the GOP prism out of your equation, Senator Cantor.

Posted by: Daveyboy1 | April 30, 2009 2:58 PM | Report abuse

The Republicans can come back if they convenced Norm Colemen to do the right thing and concede which they won't do. It will also show their honestly as to doing the right thing. But that is a dream. Its Discraceful that the Governor of Minnesota Tim Pawlenty has not signed the election certificate for Franken, this goes to show the voters again how SICK the Republicans are. They stripped the Stimulus bill of funding for flue vacinations (now we have an outbreak of swine flue), stole the 2000 election from Gore, destroyed our economy, held up nominees for the OBAMA administration and worst, disinfranchizing the voters of Minnesota, this is the worst politics. As a former Republican it makes me sick to my stomach to see how this party has lost its integrity.

Posted by: mattadamsdietmanager1014 | April 30, 2009 2:44 PM | Report abuse

"DDAWD and drindl:

"Matriculate the ball down the field" was a favorite expression of the legendary pro football coach Hank Stram from the Chiefs back when they were in the AFL (maybe that's CC's link)."

Yeah, that's what the link was about. I didn't read it carefully the first time. (I was wondering about the awkward use of matriculate in the first paragraph)

Posted by: DDAWD | April 30, 2009 1:39 PM | Report abuse

uhhh, has anyone checked out the budget?

Posted by: TheBabeNemo | April 30, 2009 1:39 PM | Report abuse

DDAWD and drindl:

"Matriculate the ball down the field" was a favorite expression of the legendary pro football coach Hank Stram from the Chiefs back when they were in the AFL (maybe that's CC's link).

Posted by: mnteng | April 30, 2009 1:18 PM | Report abuse

drindl:
((hearty laughs))

matriculate a football --but don't do it in a confined place.

Posted by: TheBabeNemo | April 30, 2009 1:15 PM | Report abuse

((the babe is literally crying from laughing too hard)))))

The American public has "given him the football and they are waiting to see how far he gets down the field and how successful his policies are to decide whether to let him keep going or pull him back,"

----I'm a Bronco fan.....
he can do anything with the ball he wants to.

Posted by: TheBabeNemo | April 30, 2009 1:13 PM | Report abuse

This is ironic... i was basing my wordplay on 'solecism' which is ungrammatical usage, and I came across this -- the word is from a city in Cilicia! Sounds like your family's home town, CC.

Origin:
1570–80; < L soloecismus < Gk soloikismós, equiv. to sóloik(os) (Sólo(i) a city in Cilicia where a corrupt form of Attic Greek was spoken + -ikos -ic ) + -ismos -ism

Posted by: drindl | April 30, 2009 1:01 PM | Report abuse


"What the hell does it mean to matriculate a football anyways?"

Nothing, as far as I can tell. I think we should call Chris' many verbal tics "cillizaisms."

Posted by: drindl | April 30, 2009 12:49 PM | Report abuse

What the hell does it mean to matriculate a football anyways?

Posted by: DDAWD | April 30, 2009 12:05 PM | Report abuse

ohlook, zouk has changed his name to fraudobama. He never tires of playing childish games.

Michael Steele said someting sensible yesterday -- how much do you wanna bet he'll be out of there soon? And tha tis another part of the R problem -- no free speech allowed. If you break with party orthodoxy, you're out.

"Much of the right-wing "outrage" against the Obama administration has been over its willingness to grant "bailouts" to Wall Street companies. In fact, the RNC is currently encouraging supporters "to speak out against the bailouts." Today on MSNBC, however, RNC Chairman Michael Steele candidly admitted that it is "disingenuous" for conservatives to blame Democrats for bailing out Wall Street, since the original bailouts were approved by President Bush:

STEELE: Look, we can't go back out and start pointing fingers at Democrats and saying look how bad they're performing, look at what they're doing with the economy when we jump-started this thing. We were the ones that put the $700 billion on the table and said, all right, let's start nationalizing the banking system. So now, for us to stand back and go, oh, that's a bad thing to do is disingenuous. So let's own up, do the my bad, and move forward."

Posted by: drindl | April 30, 2009 11:58 AM | Report abuse


Uh Oh!

MSNBC Poll...Barry's First 100 Days Grade:

A - 32%

F - 39%

347K total votes

Say it ain't so, Barry! And MSNBC of all things. His bastion of Liberal hate mongers.

Posted by: FraudObama | April 30, 2009 11:51 AM | Report abuse

"The columnist for the Times is Gail Collins (Susan is the senator from Maine)."

Haha, I was about to ask if Susan didn't listen to her own conversations and had started referring to herself in the third person.

Posted by: DDAWD | April 30, 2009 11:51 AM | Report abuse

I am enchanted by our president.....

now chris c....that's another story..
(smiles)

Posted by: TheBabeNemo | April 30, 2009 11:45 AM | Report abuse

Sadly, Rush Limpballs has more power in the GOP these days than Tom Davis.

Posted by: koolkat_1960 | April 30, 2009 11:33 AM | Report abuse

drindl, I think Tom Davis agrees with you. He would not kick out of the R Party anyone who accepted those four principles, but he decried the litmus tests of the God, gays, guns" stripe.
You agree with me that as long as the R Party is the litmus-R Party its opposition to the Prez is [uh] attenuated.

bsimon, your point that the Rs are marginalizing themselves is a good one. I do see where they are stuck, of course. You are a far more credible opponent of big govt. than most Rs at this point. I know that you have a history of voting libertarian and actually believe in the principle of limited govt. I do not see how the Rs can retain their libertarian wing after the incredible waste of the GWB Admin. They would have to get in power and actually be good stewards to have a shot at that mantle again. The good news for them is that the Ds will not be espousing limited government anytime soon. That can become again a real point of difference. But not soon.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | April 30, 2009 11:14 AM | Report abuse


"The Republican Party has officially moved into nutcase territory."


Thank you, Ms. Collins, for finally saying it out loud. And thanks bondosan for posting.

"Say What?: "We got rid of some dead weight." -- Conservative talk radio host Rush Limbaugh on Sen. Arlen Specter's (D-Pa.) party switch."

And this made me laugh -- the 10 ton anchor that's dragging the R party down calls the kettle black. Rich.

Posted by: drindl | April 30, 2009 10:50 AM | Report abuse

"First, we must focus on the broad principles that made our party strong: limited government, free trade, free markets and a strong defense. That's it.""

If that was what the republican party ACTUALLY stood for, they might not be in trouble. Thing is, it's not.

How can you say you're for limited government if you want to make medical decisions for people and tell them who they can marry?

How can you say you're for a strong defense when you're in favor of stoploss for our soldiers and forcing them to serve one tour after another, and not in favor of giving them adequate medical services--while at the same time pouring billions into the coffers of incompetent contractors for planes that will never fly -- and weapons suitable for the kinds of wars we will never fight again?

How can you say you're for 'free trade and free markets' when through greed, cronyism and fraud you've pretty much destroyed the whole system?

As long as the party is run by hucksters and carny barkers shreiking about the 'socialism' and 'fascism' of the mild, sensible, middle of the road Obama they are going to continue to look like clowns.

Their problem is, Obama acts like a good dad, and they are acting like the crazy uncles in the attic.

Posted by: drindl | April 30, 2009 10:43 AM | Report abuse

katem1 writes
"Rep.Sen.Graham had a very realistic statement along the lines of, "If someone agrees with me on 70% of the issues, we can't exclude this person from our party because of a "pure ideology" standard." This will kill the party."

earlier mark_in_austin wrote
"Tom Davis, former VA Congressman [R],
wrote in the WaPo,
"First, we must focus on the broad principles that made our party strong: limited government, free trade, free markets and a strong defense. That's it.""


Coupling the comments of Sen Graham & Rep Davis, we can begin to divine the trouble the Republicans face: differentiating their 'brand' from the Obama administration specifically & the Dems generally. The Repubs are trying to portray the Obama admin as being all wrong, all the time. But in reality, many of their policies overlap. For instance: strong defense. The Obama administration is for strong defense - they are boosting military spending, trying to grow the number of people in the armed forces, while killing some extremely expensive programs of dubious value. I suppose if the GOP interpretation of 'strong defense' is 'money is no object,' they should take that argument to the people and see how they do - particularly if they couple it with warnings about excessive taxation & deficits.

Free markets & free trade are also valued by the Obama administration. Again, its a question of degrees - do the Repubs value the free market that created the gambling problem on wall street with CDOs, no oversight of the mortgage industry, etc? If so, they ought to take that argument to the people and see how they do. The Obama administration is looking to restrain some of the financial practices that threaten the stability of our financial system, ideally without squelching economic growth in other areas. So: how free should markets be; free to the point of anarchy, or free with some limits designed to contain damage?

The problem with the GOP is they're mischaracterizing the Obama admins plans as being more excessive and radical than they really are. In the process the GOP marginalize themselves & create the perception of being uncredible and/or dishonest. Good luck with that.

Posted by: bsimon1 | April 30, 2009 10:26 AM | Report abuse

If the cheat sheet is going to continue to be a regular posting, you should come up with a better name than this. How about the White House Daily Briefing? White House Morning Report? The Brick House? (With a mouse roll-over that plays a clip of the song?) Not relevant, I know, but kind of fun. Besides, now I have the song stuck in my head.

Posted by: psears2 | April 30, 2009 10:25 AM | Report abuse

Thanx, Bondosan - "Gail" writing ABOUT "Susan" was too much for me to keep from garbling.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | April 30, 2009 10:10 AM | Report abuse

Actually, Mark:

The columnist for the Times is Gail Collins (Susan is the senator from Maine).

Also, the paragraph you quoted begins with this sentence:

"The Republican Party has officially moved into nutcase territory."

Gotta love her!

Posted by: Bondosan | April 30, 2009 10:04 AM | Report abuse

Rep.Sen.Graham had a very realistic statement along the lines of, "If someone agrees with me on 70% of the issues, we can't exclude this person from our party because of a "pure ideology" standard." This will kill the party. Yet this going out to the people thing to find out solutions that work is ridiculous at this point in time. It looks like gratuitous handwringing. The American people soundly rejected Republican policies. That should be the starting point. And not just the policies but the way the GOP does business as in rallies that are all anger, all the time. If the GOP wants to make a new impression on the voter's they first have to publicly acknowledge that former policies don't work now, and show some accountability for how screwed up everything is. If you can't acknowledge your mistakes, you are doomed to repeat them. It's taken the media still awhile to get used to the CHANGE that has come to America, and the GOP is still waking up. Throw out Rove's playbook of divisive and fear mongering campaigning. Nov/08 showed the country for the most part has grown up and wants a fair and balanced playing field, not dirty and devisive, misleading crap that insults their intelligence that they would actually believe the crap.

Posted by: katem1 | April 30, 2009 9:55 AM | Report abuse

"Whether anything real comes out of these efforts remains to be seen but they are a step in the right direction."

Nice pun. Chris got that right, but if they keep going right, they will spin circles, right?

Meanwhile, I did not know Chris owned a tie, but I am glad to see he does not know how to wear one.

Posted by: shrink2 | April 30, 2009 9:23 AM | Report abuse

This morning, Susan Collins in the NYT wrote:

"The Republican moderate caucus in the Senate is down to the two women from Maine. And we would all certainly like to listen in on their conversations on the plane ride home."

Yesterday Tom Davis, former VA Congressman [R],
wrote in the WaPo,
"First, we must focus on the broad principles that made our party strong: limited government, free trade, free markets and a strong defense. That's it. Believe anything else you want, but don't make those beliefs a litmus test for admission. Litmus tests are fine for a private club, but they're no formula for a successful political coalition."

Litmus test republicanism, as criticized by Davis, will have the effect of not coalescing opposition to the Admin on the issues that people care about most. The result will be that general trust of the Admin will continue to float above the fray. We may or may not like the Prez's solutions but we are offered no real alternatives, and this "coach" explains what he is doing.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | April 30, 2009 9:06 AM | Report abuse

Republicans Form "National Council For a New America"

Hmmm... sounds a lot like "Project for a New American Century."

More apropos: "The Emporer's New Clothes Council."

***

SOLOMON-LIKE "SWAGGAH" IS LOOKING GOOD FOR AMERICA


Barack Obama may not be the "messiah," but he's surely a disciple of Solomon.

The impatent "progressive" left wants him to declare "torture" a crime -- when his unstated message is that it is not for him to decide.

By acknowledging that waterboarding is torture -- but by refusing to declare that the Bush administration broke the law -- Obama placates his critics while he provides the political cover necessary to allow his Attorney General to fairly and impartially enforce the law.

(He also may know of pending torture revelations to come -- that, in hindsight, may make waterboarding look quaint.)

Add to the Solomon-like wisdom a Kennedyesque display of wit, charm and "swaggah" -- the Obama version of JFK's "vigah."

"Enchanting," Obama deadpanned, when a New York Times reporter asked a classic four-part "touchy-feely" question (and a good one, since it elicited a seemingly heartfelt -- and politically savvy -- response about how he is emotionally moved when he meets with the troops.

Looked at through the optics of politics or cosmetics, it was another bravura performance by a young, confident President who makes "swaggah" look smart, indeed.

***

A special request to both POTUS and FLOTUS:

Please re-read, and heed, Dwight David Eisenhower's farewell address.

And please...

...beware of hawks bearing "photo ops."


http://nowpublic.com/world/gestapo-usa-govt-funded-vigilante-network-terrorizes-america

http://NowPublic.com/scrivener

Posted by: scrivener50 | April 30, 2009 8:50 AM | Report abuse

Obama was/is a great campaigner but his control of the facts or spin is just same old Washington DC politics. Here is a link to a fact checker on Obama’s speech.

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/news/ap/politics/2009/Apr/30/fact_check__obama_s_job__deficit_claims_are_iffy.html

Posted by: sltiowa | April 30, 2009 8:41 AM | Report abuse

"On the other, the fact that three in ten like Obama but dislike his policies could well portend a much more difficult political environment for the president over the next 100 days than he dealt with in the first 100 days."

The three in 10 who don't like his policies probably watch Fox news and hence have no idea what is actually going on in the world anyhow. I doubt he'll lose much sleep over it.

Posted by: drindl | April 30, 2009 8:02 AM | Report abuse

Can't imagine a better presser Obama could have delivered. There is a reason why he won the election and is enjoying such high approval numbers in the midst of crises (most of which are not of his doing, but still).

http://www.political-buzz.com/

Posted by: parkerfl1 | April 30, 2009 7:57 AM | Report abuse

My opinion, only - stated with more certainty than I feel for the sake of brevity.

I do not put great faith in the "favorability" polls. They are a fleeting metric, performed in a vacuum, and provide only one useful comparison. Here is what is useful: If a Prez were LESS popular than his policies, we would know that his position vis-a-vis Congress was precarious.

Leadership depends in part on the willingness of the team to trust the coach, even when the team disagrees about his game plan. GWB was reelected in 2004 based on the leap of faith by people who disagreed with significant parts of his game plan. By 2006, that reservoir of trust and affection was probably exhausted.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | April 30, 2009 7:54 AM | Report abuse

Bringing out Jeb Bush to rebrand the GOP is a step in the direction????

Might want to rethink that analysis Chris.

A new direction probably requires NEW LAST NAMES.

Posted by: tallertapas311 | April 30, 2009 6:48 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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