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Another McCain Staffer Departs

Mary Kate Johnson, the finance director for Sen. John McCain's (R-Ariz.) presidential campaign, has resigned -- joining a stampede of senior staff on Tuesday.

Johnson's resignation was confirmed by two sources with intimate knowledge of the inner workings of McCain's campaign. Johnson was a relatively new addition to the McCain team, brought in after McCain underperformed expectations in the first fundraising quarter. Johnson replaced longtime McCain finance consultant Carla Eudy.

With Johnson gone, the vast majority of McCain's senior staff has left the campaign. Rick Davis has stepped in as campaign manager and a few other key figures remain involved -- including former McCain chief of staff Mark Salter. But, the McCain campaign looks vastly different tonight that it did just twelve hours ago.

By washingtonpost.com Editors  |  July 10, 2007; 9:54 PM ET
Categories:  Eye on 2008  
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Next: Parsing the Polls: Understanding Independents

Comments

Daniel -- Ah, isn't a voting record a compilation of a politician's actions?

Perhaps what you mean is either that (1) some issues are more important than others to particular voters, like you; or (2) you actually demand COMPLETE agreement on all issues.

Posted by: Colin | July 12, 2007 11:25 AM | Report abuse

Just b/c someone has the "most consistent conservative voting record" doesn't mean they are conservative. Even though JM has a good conservative record, he still supported McCain-Feingold, Immigration Bill, Gang of 14 etc. Voting records have increasingly become hiding places for politicians. Although usefull in evaluating, they don't tell us the whole story. Actions are just as imortant as voting record.

Posted by: Daniel | July 11, 2007 11:53 PM | Report abuse

Glad to hear that Senator McCain finally woke up to the fact that John Weaver is a horrible operative and really unloaded on his incompetency.

John Weaver is a decade-long loser, and an arrogant ass who is widely reviled in GOP circles for abusive mistreatment of hard-working, lower level campaign staff.

Beyond that, he is a tactical moron to boot. First, he orchestrated Phil Gramm's "brilliant" 1996 campaign focusing on straw polls and only straw polls. Result -- Phil Gramm was elected President of "StrawPoll-istan" and retired to Texas.

Then, he decided that the way McCain could/would win in 2000 was by focusing on the large number of Republican primary voters who adore the media and agree with the NY Times editorial page.

Result -- McCain wins a couple of states where independents and Democrats could vote in the Republican primary, but couldn't even win a true Republican primary anywhere, including New York, where one would expect to find the maximum number of GOP primary voters who agree with the NY Times editorial page. (By the way, I am still looking for one.)

Then in 2008, Weaver was so stuck in the "glory" of reliving the rare and meaningless "victories" he experienced in 2000 that he never figured out that there is a difference between running as an outsider and running as the frontrunner. But he was very good at dumping money down a rathole just like the good Democrat he became when he resigned his GOP affiliation after having a public sissy-fit when Karl Rove and company cleaned his clock (yet again) in the 2000 elections.

Boy, John Weaver really "stuck it to the man" by resigning his GOP affiliation, and going to work for the likes of the DCCC, Dick Gephardt and the Trial Lawyers, didn't he? Prissy little moron.

The sad thing is that it took Senator McCain eight long years to figure out that maybe you should hire an actual Republican as your chief strategist if you want to compete for the Republican Presidential nomination.

Posted by: Grand Old Party Poohbah | July 11, 2007 10:31 PM | Report abuse

Jay Mullins--

You are correct that the last sitting U.S. Senator elected president was John F. Kennedy. In the entire 20th Century, the only other sitting U.S. Senator elected president was Warren G. Harding.

1900 through 2004-- only two sitting U.S. Senators elected president. And neither finished his first term.

Posted by: Terry L. Walker | July 11, 2007 5:58 PM | Report abuse

Ron Paul...I read somewhere that he considers himself a Libertarian, actually. That includes small govt, low taxes, and keeping the gov out of our private lives, our bedrooms, and practicing the intent of our US constitution (imagine), instead of allowing Clintonesque appointees to re-write it. Also he is not an isolationist, but believes we cannot be the worlds policeman either, instead a more limited role for us in always trying (and dying) to "fix" every conflict around the world. I voted for Bush twice, I realize now he is stubborn, to a fault. And has wasted 300 billion in Iraq, over 3,000 lives, and thousands more who will never be able to live a normal life. Colin Powell had it right about Iraq all along, but Chaney pushed him out. Condi Rice could be the GOP nominee, maybe President, were it not for Iraq. Let's face it, not every country needs our version of a democracy. Some cannot get past their own arrogance to see that. More chaos will follow in the civil war in Iraq when we leave. As the poster above said, the war was the main issue that ruined McCains chances. Other issues finished him off, but Iraq was the deal killer. If we are not aggressive, the Dems will get a veto proof majority in '08. Can you imagine that ?

Posted by: Jay Mullins | July 11, 2007 5:03 PM | Report abuse

McCain pandered to Democrats in trying to get the GOP nomination in 2000. He has alienated conservatives anew with the immigration bill, and driven off his Democrat supporters (who, unlike 2000, have their own party's nomination to care about anyway) by supporting Bush's policy on Iraq. McCain-Feingold means he'd never get libertarians. Who's left that would support him?

Posted by: McGehee | July 11, 2007 5:01 PM | Report abuse

Check out http://www.youchoose08.tv for news and videos on the '08 Presidential Candidates!

Posted by: youchoose08.tv | July 11, 2007 4:53 PM | Report abuse

I love all the posts praising Ron Paul. This man is NOT conservative. For one, he supports repealing drug laws designed to keep illegal drugs off the streets. I welcome someone to argue how that's conservative. Every post about Ron Paul on here is supposedly from different people from different walks of life, i.e. democrats, republicans, and independants. I'm willing to bet these are actuall all posted by one person, one of his very lowly paid (if paid at all) campaign workers trying desprately to get any sort of facetime. Paul DOES have principled, non-wavering stands, you gotta give him that. But they seem a little Lyndon LaRouche-esque....

Posted by: Marc | July 11, 2007 4:34 PM | Report abuse

I like McCain, always have. He should stop sucking up to the social conservatives and do what he thinks is right.

He's not falling behind because of McCain-Feingold; nobody really cares about that. He's taken some hits on immigration, but that will blow over. The big thing keeping him down is his stance on the war. The vast majority of Americans, of all political stripes, want us out.

Posted by: Jim R. | July 11, 2007 4:20 PM | Report abuse

McCain...can someone tell me, who was the last US Senator elected President? I think JFK 1960. Before that? I cannot think of a single one. Could be wrong though. Bottom line, people are turned off to DC. Carter, Reagan, Bush, Clinton, Bush all Govs, let's hope Hilliary does not break that streak.
I feel for you McCainiacs, but he is DOA.
Also, why are Mitts national poll numbers hardly out of single digits? The latest combo poll (RCP aver-see Fox) has Rudy at 26, Fred at 19, McC at 16, and Mitt at 10%!! That should be good news for Fred backers. Since Ron Paul is such a longshot, Fred may be the man. But dont give up yet on Dr Paul.

Posted by: Jay Mullins | July 11, 2007 4:16 PM | Report abuse

I just about sprayed my lunch all over my key board when i read a comment about John McCain being the most conservative in the race. Please people think before you type.

Posted by: Lawrence | July 11, 2007 4:05 PM | Report abuse

My problem with Gov Romney is that I don't believe he believes what he's saying re: conservative values and policy. He's late to the dance and I believe the criticism that he formulates his views based on when/where he's running for office is fair. I didn't get the sense that McCain was saying what people wanted to hear (a fact that I think contributed to his demise). I think that Rudy has remained relatively consistent with his views, admitting that he is not traditionally "conservative" on a number of issues and that voters could take him or leave him based on where he stands. The fact is, you can't be all things to all people. Politicians who recognize this and who are comfortable in their own skin tend to do well.

Posted by: RSW | July 11, 2007 4:04 PM | Report abuse

I've always found it interesting that folks ding Rudy for dressing as a woman while serving as Mayor. He appeared in a video-taped skit with Donald Trump to benefit a Catholic charity. Do folks seriously believe this to be a liability? I agree there are some issues with Rudy's personal life - multiple wives, etc. But this is the post-Clinton era, and I doubt people care much about that any more. I continue to believe that, faced with Hilary on the Dem side and Rudy for the GOP, a SIGNIFICANT number of Democrats and independents will vote for Rudy, giving him the majority he will need to win the White House. He'll make NY, PA, OH, FL, and possibly CA competitive for the GOP, something no other Republican candidate can do. Democrats bemoan Rudy as unelectable because of the primary process, but if he makes it out as the candidate (lots of Republicans are looking for a candidate who can win), Democrats should rightfully be scared.

Posted by: RSW | July 11, 2007 3:54 PM | Report abuse

I have voted Democrat in the last 2 elections for Gore and Kerry but I would happily vote for Ron Paul in 2008--he is by far my favorite candidate--He is offering America a chance to return to its founding ideals of liberty and freedom and away from ever-bigger government. It's sad that the people from his "party" have lost their sense of purpose they can't even recognize an ACTUAL CONSERVATIVE any longer, they're looking for a FASCIST who calls himself a conservative while supporting the indiscriminate slaughter of civilians and torture of suspected enemies not to mention continuing erosion of our civil liberties and bloated governmental spending--that's the new Republican platform.

Posted by: Adam | July 11, 2007 3:52 PM | Report abuse

Romney's relegion is not a problem. You are listing to to much left wing media. His real problem is that he is viewed as a "flip flopper" or as a "johnny come lately" to the conservative movement.

It is unfortnate he won't be able to over come this preception. Had he been a consistent conservative all along he would have already won the crown!

Change gonna come!

Posted by: Pompey | July 11, 2007 3:42 PM | Report abuse

I have nothing bad to say about Mr. McCain personally. However, his day, if it was to come, was 2000. And it is long past. He is a serious man with serious ideas--but he also reveled in the role of maverick eight years ago, and many of the conservative activists have not forgotten. Many at that time considered him a Democrat in Republican clothing--and still do. He was once the darling of the liberal media because he was a maverick against the Reublican base--now that he is no longer completely in that role, they can't wait to bury him. But, in reality, I don't believe it is too soon to write his presidential political obituary. He is a spent force.

South Carolina? Mr. McCain simply is not going to win the nomination race in South Carolina. A lot of prominent out-front Republican politicos in South Carolina signed on with McCain early on--and now a number of them are dismayed because he seems to be cratering. The South Carolina politicos signed on with Bob Dole early on in 1996--and the Republican Party wound up with the most unelectable candidate since the Democrats picked Michael Dukakis.

The conservative activist rank and file are, in my view, not going to roll over for
a candidate hand-picked by the party leadership this time.

An admittedly unscientific July 10 straw poll by SCHotline, an online political report in South Carolina, with 515 people responding, gave these results (only the top three Democrats were listed):

Fred Tompson, 27%

Mitt Romney, 15%

Rudy Giulian, 13%

John McCain, 9%

Mike Huckabee 7%

Ron Paul, 4%

Sam Brownback 3%

Hillary Clinton 4%

Barack Obama 3%

John Edwards 2%

All Others 11%

Sort of gives one an idea of Mr. McCain's relative standing, though I cannot speak to the nature and makeup of those who took the straw poll.

One poster mentioned the strong endorsement by Senator Lyndsey Graham. Not everyone in the South Carolina Republican base is particularly happy with Mr. Graham at this time. He was "booed" at the South Carolina Republican State Convention this year--an unheard-of event.

Posted by: Terry L. Walker | July 11, 2007 3:28 PM | Report abuse

Mitt...I wish he had a chance. But I do think he has a religious problem in all of Dixie, Texas, and many other states where Christianity is a majority. When the Dems go with Hilliary, what a contrast that would be. I think his personal values are unquestionable though, and he did a very good job as Gov and head of the Olympics. I doubt he has used an "escort" service, and he has a good bloodline. His poll numbers are still anemic.
I sense that abortion may be a serious sleeper issue, which should help Rudy. I am prolife, but I will not fall on my sword over that. That's up to the Supreme Court.
We have alot more to worry about. What yall think?

Posted by: Jay mullins | July 11, 2007 3:25 PM | Report abuse

McCain should make public appearances wearing a hooded cloak and carrying a long-handled sickle. Not only does he look like Death, but there are 134 brave sailors whom I'm sure are looking forward to having a long discussion with him after he closes his eyes for the last time. Nice scarf, flyboy!

Posted by: Justin Kayatin | July 11, 2007 3:24 PM | Report abuse

Romney is the only logical choice for Rs. The old Bush neo-cons and all the other fools are gathering behind Fred Thompson who is kind of old plus has lymphoma, a serious desease. He is unelectable. There are pictures of Guiliani dressed as a woman and I will not vote for a man who dresses as a woman under any circumstance. I've always been an R but this new breed are crazed. I hope they do the right thing and get behind Romney.

Posted by: duane lominac | July 11, 2007 3:24 PM | Report abuse

No matter what the media says, he had great numbers until he went front and center in his support for that horrible immigration bill. At that point he dropped like a two ton brick. That's it in a nutshell.

Posted by: Mac | July 11, 2007 3:21 PM | Report abuse

You people do not understand why he is in such bad shape. I will list some of them for you taxes, judges and immigration. If his poll numbers were due to his stance on the war then Ruddy would have numbers just as bad. Understand the Rep's lost the Congress because the electorate was upset because they did not govern as the conservatives that they ran as.

Posted by: Mark, Phoenix, AZ | July 11, 2007 3:11 PM | Report abuse

I liked McCain and would have voted for him until his immigration bill with Kennedy. Had he come out in favor of the fence and securing our borders, he might have been the front runner today. Too bad John.

Posted by: Ron J | July 11, 2007 3:10 PM | Report abuse

I've supported Sen McCain for many years, however, I've begun to realize that Mitt Romney may be the strongest candidate we've ever produced.

The media keeps telling us that he has a "religon" problem, but I don't believe that. This country was founded on freedom of religion and I would be ashamed if our party truly rejected a candidate because of his religion (from my experience, "Mormons" are the most patriotic, god-fearing, family oriented Americans I have ever met).

Infact, I am often ashamed of conservative my Baptist congregation when I compare the lives of the members of my congregation with the lives of my Mormon friends congregation.

Let's elect the best candidate we have. I now believe that man is Mitt Romney.

Posted by: Doug Merritt | July 11, 2007 2:57 PM | Report abuse

I've supported Sen McCain for many years, however, I've begun to realize that Mitt Romney may be the strongest candidate we've ever produced.

The media keeps telling us that he has a "religon" problem, but I don't believe that. This country was founded on freedom of religion and I would be ashamed if our party truly rejected a candidate because of his religion (from my experience, "Mormons" are the most patriotic, god-fearing, family oriented Americans I have ever met).

Infact, I am often ashamed of conservative my Baptist congregation when I compare the lives of the members of my congregation with the lives of my Mormon friends congregation.

Let's elect the best candidate we have. I now believe that man is Mitt Romney.

Posted by: Doug Merritt | July 11, 2007 2:56 PM | Report abuse

Everyone in the press seems to be drooling in anticipation of ways to spin the departure of Weaver and Nelson as the rats abandoning ship ahead of it sinking. In reality, most people near the campaign see this as an "it's about time" move and are celebrating, not drowning their sorrows. Weaver and Nelson had steadily driven away the true "McCainiacs" and had replaced them with people from the Bush campaigns who didn't care about McCain, nor were capable of understanding and embracing who he is. Now, finally, that is all changing.

Posted by: Thom | July 11, 2007 2:54 PM | Report abuse

Wow...I think I was the first this am to push Ron Paul on this blog. I think the herd is coming together. "unelectable" ? Where was the Arkansas Gov. at this point in 1991?
You will not see much of Dr Paul in MSM because he wants less government, and the liberal media always wants more Gov. Most liberals have never seen a Gov. giveaway program they did not like...unless it had measures of accountability... heaven forbid that!
The Red states are not going to vote for a non-Christian, knocks out Romney and Bloomberg. The Breck Boy will pander to anyone, and beat no one with his class warfare messages. Do we really want Hilliary with Dem Congressional majority?
Is the country ready for Obama ?
Fred...have to wait and see on that one. He is a media darling now, but if he announces, he will be shark bait. I'll ask again, do we really want Hilliary ??!!

Posted by: Jay mullins | July 11, 2007 2:53 PM | Report abuse

All comments seem to come from Democrats. John McCain never had a chance in the Republican party because of his campaign finance reforms, his lack of support for tax cuts, his membership in the "Gang of 14" and then add in the idea he teamed with Ted Kennedy on amnesty for illegal aliens and you have just described a democrat. Not a good idea when running in a Republican primary. People keep saying it's his support of the war thaT IS hurting him but that is not true as the Republicans generally favor winning the war and all the candidates have very similar views.
Please Mr. McCain, just retire and be remebered for the hero that you are as you just can't represent the Republicans in a national election.

Posted by: Will Farmer | July 11, 2007 2:43 PM | Report abuse

Ron Paul is definitely conservative.

Posted by: jabree | July 11, 2007 2:33 PM | Report abuse

Ron Paul is the clear choice for a return to true conservative principle

Posted by: yogluu | July 11, 2007 2:02 PM | Report abuse

How many of you have had an eyeball to eyeball discussion with Sen. McCain? How many of you have had a detailed discussion with Ric Davis? How many of you have had talks with Sen. McCain's very close friends, including those who served with him in the Hanoi prison? I have. Please don't count him out, I believe the campaign has just begun. The media seem to have discounted an American hero and leader for some reason. Supporting Sen. McCain for president is worth the fighting for.

Posted by: Jimmy | July 11, 2007 1:59 PM | Report abuse

RON PAUL 2008. I deeply encourage everyone to check this man out. He should be the one republicans go with. No one stands by the constitution and our bill of rights stronger than him. Please check him out.

Posted by: Luke | July 11, 2007 1:59 PM | Report abuse

Political opinions are always so exaggerated. Whenever someone is up temporarily, he's a genius; whenever someone is down temporarily, he's an irredeemable schlub. This is why it is so easy to make money on Intrade.

Posted by: Glenn Friedman | July 11, 2007 1:46 PM | Report abuse

This fossil needs to go back to the boneyard. About as popular as chronic diarrhea. Of course, like Lil' Bush he's in denial about reality (see his "Iraq is safe and secure" walk while being guarded by half the US army). So he'll probably hang on until he has 0% polling, and maybe beyond.

Posted by: Stan Buie | July 11, 2007 1:15 PM | Report abuse


One person's view. I think the good senator started to go down the shoot when his sugar daddy Don Imus went off the air. Imus had a way to keep the senator in the news no matter how distorted the senator's positions were.

I hope the president can find a way to reward the senator for being a shill for this adminitration.

Posted by: Jim R | July 11, 2007 1:12 PM | Report abuse

So,Mr McCain is a principled martyr is he,humm. Now let's see:
1) Against the tax cut which has resulted in the current prosperity and low unemployment.
2) Led the most outrageous frontal attack on the First Amendment in a generation with McCain Finegold.
3)Out front supporting the backroom hatched, fraudulent amnisty bill while playing the race card.
Now if this is princpled then who's principles are they?

Change gonna' come!

Posted by: Pompey | July 11, 2007 1:07 PM | Report abuse

I had planned to contribute to McCain's campaign but decided that I wouldn't give him one red cent after he seeing how he sided with Ted Kennedy on the illegal immigration issue. Good riddance.

Posted by: Doctor Adams | July 11, 2007 1:06 PM | Report abuse

McCain is a rockhead. He refused to listen to American citizens on the subject of immigration and border control, choosing instead to try curry favor with illegals. The American people have spoken. McCain is out!

Posted by: R Tjomas | July 11, 2007 1:03 PM | Report abuse

All of the Ron Paul minions who post here are really lucky they found him and not someone like Jim Jones. Otherwise they would have been drinking his Kool-Aid. Classic example of the lower end of the Bell Curve.

Posted by: Big John | July 11, 2007 12:57 PM | Report abuse

McCain is probably finshed now. Who is going to be writing checks to a campaign that looks like it isn't even going to exist in January? He could have made it had he started out with this pared-down campaign scale on a lower budget. But to go from the odds-on favorite down to the second tier and then hope to come back up? No. Now he looks like a loser rather than an up-and-comer. People don't like to vote for losers.

I won't say that it is completely impossible for McCain to make it at this point. But I would be very surprised.

Posted by: Jackson Landers | July 11, 2007 12:49 PM | Report abuse

Hey Joseph Iruku: Isn't there a bridge that needs to jumped off somewhere right now? Please leave.

Posted by: Kevin | July 11, 2007 12:40 PM | Report abuse

Don't rule war hero, solid citizen John McCain out. Rick Davis will be a great campaign manager now that the deadwood have left.

Posted by: Duke | July 11, 2007 12:35 PM | Report abuse

Don't rule war hero, solid citizen John McCain out. Rick Davis will be a great campaign manager now that the deadwood have left.

Posted by: Duke | July 11, 2007 12:33 PM | Report abuse

Kent: The Founder's intent???? Who the F cares about the Founder's intent in terms of what do we do about health care costs, climate change, family meltdown, etc.? Yes, we use the Constitution to shape our laws. But do you really think old Thomas Jefferson has something buried in his writings about carbon emmisions? OIA! (Only in America).

Posted by: Kevin | July 11, 2007 12:28 PM | Report abuse

Get a grip, McCain haters. He's RAISED tons more than any other Republican presidential candidate in HISTORY, save for Bush 2004. And that's just the big money boys. He has yet to hit up the under $500 donors or to ramp up his internet fundraising. The money guys are ALWAYS fickle with the wind.

So, he spent like drunken sailor for the first two quarters...what did you expect? He's NAVY, man! Nobody does retail politic and earned media better than John McCain.

Wait for the Second Act.

Posted by: GOPNYC | July 11, 2007 12:26 PM | Report abuse

L.Sterling, why is Ron Paul "unelectable?" Unless he is an animal, and not born in the USA, he is electable. It's people like you that plant the seeds of doubt in the undecided. Why go with another hack actor who is really a highly paid, government bribing lobbyist that does not deserve to be in the White house?

Even though I am a Libertarian, I will vote for Congressman Ron Paul because he is the only candidate who truly deserves to be called a Statesman. The only candidate who will reduce the size of government. The rest are full of poop. We have to do something America. Forget the global warming crap. The real tipping point on what is left of our freedoms is happening now.

The crisis is a huge, tyrannical government that only wants to get bigger, more intrusive, and take more of our hard earned bread. Only Ron Paul will save the Republic from it's slide into Orwellian totalitarianism. McCain Supporters please donate your money to Dr. Ron Paul and get off your bottoms and vote for Ron Paul in 2008!

Posted by: Carl | July 11, 2007 12:23 PM | Report abuse

I keep seeing in print and from the great prophet Stephanopolis that Ron Paul cannot win anything. My question is why not. I have kept up with him for a decade, but to the unwashed mainstream masses, he was unknown 6 weeks ago. Look at his record, listen to his words. Man, he is a real thing, - not some media hyped bowl of crap called conservative. For decades it has been "them" that define our terms, let us do it for ourselves for a change. Think folk, think.

Posted by: KentC | July 11, 2007 12:15 PM | Report abuse

John McCain is, and always will be, a flake. When he teams up with the biggest socialist/Stalinists in the Senate (Kennedy, Feingold) to conspire against US citizens, it ought to be abundantly clear to all. Trouble is, thinking of the bell curve, half the people of this country are stupid enough to fall for his political gymnastics.

Posted by: William | July 11, 2007 12:11 PM | Report abuse

Great recent posts above. Except for the ones who think McCain still has a chance.
Yes, McCain and Bush are incredibly stubborn.
In Bush's case, it will cost the GOP dearly in '08, just like in '06. There is a greater responsibility than just sticking to ones (poorly conceived) convictions, when they fly in the face of reality. The impact ripple is with every piece of legislation passed, and heaven forbid, Supreme Court nominees, plus all the appointments made in the Cabinet, Judgeships and on and on. Policy and budgets for many years to come. Oh yeah, when was the last US Senator elected President? Does anyone really believe the Dems will work with the GOP, unless the GOP caves in as they have in the last few years. I am very grateful of McCains military and DC service. I hope for the sake of the greater good that he and Bush, will think in terms of reality, instead of dragging down others with them.

Posted by: Jay Mullins | July 11, 2007 12:10 PM | Report abuse

George you are so right, but you forgot a couple of facts. He ran for a house seat in North Florida for which he was qickly dispatched. His first wife had no money and no power base. He quickly knew that was not the way to go through life easy. He would actually need to get a job.

He moved to Arizona and married the young daughter of the largest beer distributor in the state. AH! money and a power base. They used that to overwhelm anybody else for a house seat in the east valley where he waited till Goldwater resigned.

John's real problem is the same as Hillary's, personal anger as niether one accomplished anything on their own. All his dad and family early on, wife and father in law now. Hillary - Bill then and Bill now.

John just loves those stage lights, blinds one to the real truth.

Posted by: Alan in Phx,Az | July 11, 2007 12:02 PM | Report abuse

McCain's candidacy reminds me a bit of Joe Lieberman's from the 04' cycle. Both started off with high poll numbers, both cast themselves as the probable nominee with the best chance of winning, and both imploded long before the actual votes were ever cast.

Maybe McCain will get some of that Joementum...

Posted by: Bill B. | July 11, 2007 12:00 PM | Report abuse

I echo the sentiments of the above poster who pointed out that McCain has NEVER really been a Republican front runner, except as the myth is propagated by the Liberal Media, who WANT McCain to be a candidate. The whole thing is a complete non-issue....sort of like the Plame "outing" or the firings of a few US attorneys. The media tries to create excitement about a myth.

Posted by: Rick | July 11, 2007 11:55 AM | Report abuse

I see I am not the only one to have learned, to my sorrow, that Republican does not mean Conservative. Immigration certainly was the most alarming and unambiguous demonstration that Washington Republicans have lost their way to the point that they consider conservatives to be part of "The Problem".

Perhaps McCain sold his soul when, despite despising GWB (for good reasons), he sort of became a team player with the administration and Republican Party, to me solely for the purpose of securing the nomination--ironically ensuring he would never get it. I guess it struck me as a failed attempt to strike a faustian bargain--ineptitude is almost worse than cynicism.

And while his position and attitude toward conservatives on immigration sealed his fate with me, this notion of changing all of his staff strikes me as his failure to accept that HE is the problem, and that there is no staff on earth that can re-invent him with the conservative base.

Much as is happening in Minnesota, Republicans are learning that they go RINO at their peril, because when people want to vote for liberalism, a Democrat is the Real Thing.

I dearly wanted to vote for him in 2000, but I consider this my political epitaph for an honorable man who served his country with incredible courage as a veteran, but who's politics I disagree with.

Posted by: Mark K | July 11, 2007 11:53 AM | Report abuse

My god, who ARE you people that think that McCain was ever a conservative. He was only ever the front runner in the minds of the media, never did the majority of Republicans think that he was.

Posted by: asportsbill | July 11, 2007 11:43 AM | Report abuse

I've always wondered why ANYONE ever supported McCain?

Most of his life has been in Washington DC. I once attended a seminar in what once had been his nursery...a short walk from the Capitol. He was the goat of his class at the academy (lowest GPA of any midshipman in the graduating class) and a disaster as a Naval Aviator, even before he got shot down. Had he not been the son (and grandson) of an admiral, it is unlikely he would have graduated fron Annapolis OR kept his flying status.

His sole accomplishment in the Navy was to actually do pretty much what they tell you at SERE training once he was in captivity...but hey, MOST POWs did.

His only roots in Arizona were the ones that Barry Goldwater created for him there, once he was transplanted from his native Washington DC where he could never be a voting member of Congress. Once elected he quickly distinguished himself by becoming the only Republican (and arguably the least involved) in the Keating Five http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keating_Five the scandal that probably cost John Glenn his shot at the presidency.

McCain is really somewhat of a loser...always has been. The press likes him because he has cultivated this 'maverick' image, but the reailty is the man's a corrupt insider...and has always been an insider in the Washington DC establishment. Hell, he was born into it.

Posted by: George Hanshaw | July 11, 2007 11:36 AM | Report abuse

The McCain meltdown is Clinton's triangulation strategy run in reverse. McCain has staked out the least popular position on both of the most hotly contested issues of the day. That would be bad enough, but supporters for those two positions are almost completely disjoint sets. McCain has reduced his supporters to the lowest number possible.

It makes perfect sense that it would be this way. McCain has always been the mirror image of a centrist. Taking very conservative positions or very liberal ones on a case by case basis has been his pattern, a true maverick.

We need someone like McCain, or at least some parts of him. Mostly we need his integrity on things like earmarks. Had he been either a true Democrat or a true Republican, or even a centrist, but with his same interest in cutting out the crime in Washington, McCain would be in the lead today because he is the lone voice against abuse of the system, something everyone can agree with.

There is an unfortunate similarity between Bush and McCain. One of Bush's biggest problems is that he has tried to do everything, all at once, everywhere, for everyone, alienating most in the process, and accomplishing less than he could have where it mattered. McCain takes his positions based on what he thinks is right, but nobody thinks like McCain. McCain and Bush would both benefit from narrowing their objectives.

Posted by: The T in LR | July 11, 2007 11:31 AM | Report abuse

McCain is certainly a glutton for punishment. And he clearly has our current president matched for stubbornness and a refusal to accept reality.

Posted by: Mark F | July 11, 2007 11:31 AM | Report abuse

McCain-Feingold
McCain-Kennedy
McCain-Mexico
----------------
McCain-OUT!

If his campaign staff concedes his unelectable, as their departures would suggest, why should I trust defenders on a WaPo blog to convince me otherwise.

Posted by: Joseph Iruku | July 11, 2007 11:26 AM | Report abuse

McCain screwed himself. He tried to be a "good Republican" and went along w/the war and wouldnt criticize Bush, fearing that he'd piss off the far right. He all of a sudden became a supporter of these nutjobs, speaking at Jerry Falwell's university and kissing up to the base that he once shunned. Problem is, he didn't need to change who he was to win the nomination. He needed to stay the same. And by flip flopping, he lost my support and likely many others. McCain outmanuevered himself and has only himself to blame

Posted by: Ex McCain supporter | July 11, 2007 11:20 AM | Report abuse

McCain is not dropping out nor endorsing any other candidate. McCain is a fighter who will continue to fight the good fight until the voting is over. Ask yourself this: what does he have to lose? Nothing! He's a senator not up for re-election until 2010 who believes in what he is doing, therefore will continue. He doesn't have that money base of support b/c he has never pandered to that base for money. But, when ideas begin to take over the campaign, McCain will have enough money to spread his ideas. For everyone who says he needs to do well in Iowa and all of that jazz, I don't think McCain will do well in Iowa. He needs to win New Hampshire. Judd Gregg is likely to help him out there, as well as the rest of the McCain loyalists he has on the ground there from 2000. McCain is in 2nd behind Romney right now in New Hampshire, whom F. Thompson will steal votes from. McCain is leading in South Carolina right now, and has a strong endorsement there from sen. Lyndsey Graham and will propably get the endorsement, or at least back stage help, from gov. Sanford. If McCain can win the early states of New Hampshire and South Carolina he's in the race and has a great chance to win the Republican nomination. If the Michigan primary is bumped up to January or super Tuesday, that will help McCain. McCain also has some strong endorsements in Florida, especially some of the Hispanic congressmen and women. Mel Martinez is likely to help McCain there, too. He will just have to resort to stumping on the ground himself, since he will not have as much money to spend as some of the other major names in the race. But stump on the ground he will do, and he will stay in and has a good shot at victory in the end.

Posted by: reason | July 11, 2007 11:13 AM | Report abuse

McCain is not dropping out nor endorsing any other candidate. McCain is a fighter who will continue to fight the good fight until the voting is over. Ask yourself this: what does he have to lose? Nothing! He's a senator not up for re-election until 2010 who believes in what he is doing, therefore will continue. He doesn't have that money base of support b/c he has never pandered to that base for money. But, when ideas begin to take over the campaign, McCain will have enough money to spread his ideas. For everyone who says he needs to do well in Iowa and all of that jazz, I don't think McCain will do well in Iowa. He needs to win New Hampshire. Judd Gregg is likely to help him out there, as well as the rest of the McCain loyalists he has on the ground there from 2000. McCain is in 2nd behind Romney right now in New Hampshire, whom F. Thompson will steal votes from. McCain is leading in South Carolina right now, and has a strong endorsement there from sen. Lyndsey Graham and will propably get the endorsement, or at least back stage help, from gov. Sanford. If McCain can win the early states of New Hampshire and South Carolina he's in the race and has a great chance to win the Republican nomination. If the Michigan primary is bumped up to January or super Tuesday, that will help McCain. McCain also has some strong endorsements in Florida, especially some of the Hispanic congressmen and women. Mel Martinez is likely to help McCain there, too. He will just have to resort to stumping on the ground himself, since he will not have as much money to spend as some of the other major names in the race. But stump on the ground he will do, and he will stay in and has a good shot at victory in the end.

Posted by: reason | July 11, 2007 11:13 AM | Report abuse

Lots of humping on this blog for Ron Paul. At this juncture, completely unelectable. Romney may be a "suit" and Giuliani, a serial monogamist, but McCain seemed to be the only one supporting the congressional candidates in 2006, and stumping for the GOP in venues across the board during the last campaign. He was the only one of the current crop to do so, to any effect. At long last however, his support of the immigration bill, (hated by both Repubs and Dems), the Bushie position on Iraq, the sub-rosa preparation by the neo-cons and Israeli lobby for a strike against Iran, and, not for nothing, his AGE, have conspired to make him last night's news. It may be sad to many, but it looks like he's getting ready to pack it in. He should be gone by September...

Posted by: L.Sterling | July 11, 2007 11:12 AM | Report abuse

Regardless of of the politics, the man and his family have sacrificed a lot for the country. As he fades from the political scene, we all owe him thanks and respect.

Posted by: A3J | July 11, 2007 11:10 AM | Report abuse

McCain has been very wrong on two huge issues...immigration and Iraq. He has lost his "Maverick" glow since 2000 by becoming just another DC politician. I'll bet he is out of the race within 60 days...he has no money, and no staff. Only someone with blinders on would contribute to him now. Please read the post above by tw2003. I cannot say it any better. Please discover Ron Paul.

Posted by: Jay Mullins | July 11, 2007 11:00 AM | Report abuse

Congressman Ron Paul will gain even more supporters after McCain's fall.

www.RonPaul2008.com

Posted by: J.B. | July 11, 2007 10:54 AM | Report abuse

David Vitter for President! He'll keep the economy moving, by spreading $$ around. LOL

Posted by: Loudoun Voter | July 11, 2007 10:52 AM | Report abuse

Bobby in Edmond has nailed it. McCain was never a conservative. He was just a Republican in name who kept saying things that irritated members of "his" party but got great press from the MSM every time he did so.

He would have been toasted (and not in the good sense) by that same MSM if he'd ever have gotten the nomination. The press wanted John McCain to be the Republican nominee very, very badly, because they knew how much that would weaken the Republican base.

Short answer: He didn't have a prayer from the beginning. People who thought he did read too many MSM press clippings.

Posted by: Rod | July 11, 2007 10:51 AM | Report abuse

Count me among the folks who really liked McCain in 2000, before he tried to become the establishment candidate. I still respect the guy more than the other GOP candidates, if for no other reason than the fact that he at least looks guilty and unhappy when he panders, but it really has been sad to watch him embrace so much of the Bush administration's failed - and not conservative - legacy.

All that being said, I think he would -- without a doubt -- make the best president out of the current GOP crop. But for that very reason there's no way he's going to get the nomination at this point. The modern GOP, which is dominated by big-government Bush republicans, isn't going to accept a candidate that cares as much about balancing the budget as he does slashing taxes. Or who actually seems to value federalism more than passing federal laws to control what people do in their bedrooms.

Posted by: Colin | July 11, 2007 10:49 AM | Report abuse

John McCain (and GWB) lost my support when they tried to ram the "Comprehensive" Immigration bill down our collective throats. The idea that they met in secret with such thieves as Teddy and then embarked on a campaign to marginalize any one who had the audacity to oppose them really hurt their cause. Worse yet, it has caused people who previously supported them to completly distrust ANY THING they do or say. I could never support any politician that allows the law to be blatantly ignored.

Posted by: AJP | July 11, 2007 10:45 AM | Report abuse

McCain says he wants to reduce the federal spending, but it's telling how he managed his campaign, burning up the $24 million campaign dollars to less than $2 million now.

Ron Paul appeals to many people across party lines. I bet you would never see him manage money poorly like McCain. He is the most consistent and principled candidate ever, with over a solid 20 year voting record. He uses the Constitution as a guide and works hard to protect our freedom and liberty. He's for limited government, knows how money works, and won't accept any from corrupting lobbiests and corrupting corporations. He works for We The People, not the power elite.

Ron Paul has repeatedly demonstrated that he does what he says. I bet you would never see him manage money poorly like McCain.

Posted by: tw2003 | July 11, 2007 10:43 AM | Report abuse

Everyone needs to check out Ron Paul. He is "the real deal baby...". Run Ron run !

Posted by: Jay Mullins | July 11, 2007 10:31 AM | Report abuse

McCain worked long, hard and diligently to sabotage his 2008 run. Either none of his handlers warned him or could save him from himself. And he came across as infirm or senile because of it. Now the old soldier can just fade away.

Posted by: Scott Dance | July 11, 2007 10:31 AM | Report abuse

The John McCain presidential bid is failing because he supports illegal immigration and restrictions on free speech, AKA McCain-Feingold.

He has been a disappointment to his Arizona constituents, and he would be a disappointment as a President. His immigration stand is destroying my home, and he would do the same for America.

The people who know him best, Arizona voters like myself, won't vote for him in 2008. A lifelong Republican, I would vote for Hillary first. At least after that disaster a real conservative would win in 2012.

Posted by: AZ voter | July 11, 2007 10:23 AM | Report abuse

What a shame. McCain is the only guy with a sack and a backbone in the race. He has plenty of finance talent in his committee and should tap it. I can think of 1 newly retired Wall Street executive that could clean up this mess.

Posted by: Johnny Sizey | July 11, 2007 10:12 AM | Report abuse

What a shame. McCain is the only guy with a sack and a backbone in the race. He has plenty of finance talent in his committee and should tap it. I can think of 1 newly retired Wall Street executive that could clean up this mess.

Posted by: Johnny Size | July 11, 2007 10:11 AM | Report abuse

What a shame. McCain is the only guy with a sack and a backbone in the race. He has plenty of Finance talent in his committee and should tap it. I can think of 1 newly retired Wall Street executive that could clean up this mess.

Posted by: Johnny Size | July 11, 2007 10:10 AM | Report abuse

McCain, Obama, Rudy, Clinton, it does not matter. Unfortunately it took segregationist Governor Wallace to reveal the truth that "there's not a dime's worth of difference between" Republicans and Democrats. The Democrats willingly went along with the War in Iraq, suspension of Habeas Corpus, detaining protestors, banning books like "America Deceived' from Amazon, stealing private lands (Kelo decision), warrant-less wiretapping and refusing to investigate 9/11 properly. They are both guilty of treason.
Support Dr. Ron Paul and end this madness.
Last link (before Stark County District Library bends to gov't Will and drops the title):
http://www.iuniverse.com/bookstore/book_detail.asp?&isbn=0-595-38523-0

Posted by: Oliver T | July 11, 2007 10:08 AM | Report abuse

McCain can endorse Immigration Bill, or Ron Paul, for all I care.

It seems both Algore and John McCain are BUSTS.

Posted by: Carol Herman | July 11, 2007 10:08 AM | Report abuse

The Republicans don't have a candidate. McCain has been brainwashed, Giuliani is a serial adulterer, Romney is an empty suit, and Fred Thompson hasn't even declared his candidacy yet. Chuck Hagel and Michael Bloomberg are waiting in the wings ready to pick up the pieces.

John McCain never was a serious candidate. He has trouble staying alert during a TV interview. The guy is totally washed out. He's like a punch-drunk fighter who doesn't know when to quit.

Posted by: John Miffel | July 11, 2007 10:02 AM | Report abuse

You guys are clueless about McCain. BCRA pretty well cooked his chances with the Republican base. The "Gang of 14" undercutting dealing with the abuse of filibusters last session, and now the "shamnesty" bill just reinforced our impressions of him. A lot of the problem with the immigration bill was how they cooked it up in secret and then tried to cram it down our throats. Since the current laws aren't being enforced, there is zero credibility that the provisions in this bill would make any difference.

McCain's support for the war in Iraq is the only thing he has going for him. The public's attitude towards Iraq is being spun by the Democrats and legacy media. What folks want is to either do what it takes to win, or get out. Remember, the Republican candidate will be chosen by people who support the war in Iraq.

Posted by: Jack Okie | July 11, 2007 9:57 AM | Report abuse

If given the chance, Romney would actually deliver results most conservatives would be proud of...but unfortunately that most likely won't be possible given that the vast R Christian Coalition won't judge a man by the content of his character but rather by the color of his Christianity...

Posted by: Texas2Step | July 11, 2007 9:42 AM | Report abuse

Those of you who think that McCain is a "Conservative" have been smoking something. You tought his reputation as a maverick and then have the guts to call him conservative. There are several reasons the real conservatives do not trust him. You have listed several and others go back to when he was branded by his media buddies as a maverick. Have you forgotten about the Keating Five. Those five Senators, McCain included, should have gone to jail. That man has never had a conservative idea that he did not think was going to get him a headline. Good riddance.

Posted by: Bobby in Edmond | July 11, 2007 9:42 AM | Report abuse

McCain is NOT losing support because of his alliance with GWB and his support of the war. If that's the case how does Rudy keep the lead? Why is he not losing support?

McCain is losing support based on his support of the bad immigration bill. Protect our borders? Are you kidding me!? That bill does absolutely nothing to protect our borders!

You want facts? Look at the percentage of illegal aliens before Simpson-Mazzoli passed in the 80's. Then look at the percentage of illegal aliens today. Simpson-Mazzoli granted amnesty then too. When tried amnesty has NEVER worked.

Posted by: Doc | July 11, 2007 9:37 AM | Report abuse

If McCain (or Bush) is a conservative, then I must be mickey mouse. The terms conservative, liberal, democrat, republican, left, right, have become meaningless. They are out of date terms meant to control the brainwashed masses, the non-thinking folk like Coastal Conservative. Ron Paul looks to be the only person running, from either party, with traditional values and a desire to conform to the Founders intent.

Posted by: Kent | July 11, 2007 9:32 AM | Report abuse

Principled is insufficient; correctness is to be preferred. McCain is principled, but he has serious shortcomings with correctness.

Posted by: mso | July 11, 2007 9:32 AM | Report abuse

I think, given the recent political environment, McCain would have been better served staying with his MO from the 2000 cycle as opposed to switching strategies to pander to the absolute right wing. Even though he lost the nomintion in 2000, he was respected and considered a "Straight Talker", now, he is just a wannabe who will say whatever his "base" wants to hear to get elected. Its a shame!

Posted by: Amod Damle | July 11, 2007 9:31 AM | Report abuse

It sounds like Fred Thompson should have very little trouble finding a staff.

Posted by: Luigi | July 11, 2007 9:23 AM | Report abuse

Everyone should read Bokonon's Corollary:

Romney could be the next President if he tied the Democratic candidate to the roof of a car and had him driven to a secure, undisclosed location.

Posted by: Mark in Austin | July 11, 2007 9:00 AM | Report abuse

The McCain of 2000 would have been the most principled Republican candidate today. But I'm not sure about the McCain of 2007. McCain lost a lot of credibility with me in the last few years, as he constantly supported Bush. He didn't even really speak out against the Swift Boat attacks on a fellow veteran in 2004, because he was too busy campaigning for Bush. McCain seemed like a maverick in 2000; now, he's just a mainstream Republican.

He still might be the most principled major Republican candidate. But being more principled than Romney and Giuliani is hardly impressive.

Posted by: Blarg | July 11, 2007 8:57 AM | Report abuse

Mark in Austin: I agree with Bokonon (I'm so agreeable lately; did someone slip some Valium in my coffee?) and somewhat with "Coastal Conservative." McCain is far and away the most principled candidate on the R side. But the current occupant of the WH makes it obvious that those qualities are no longer needed or desirable to the GOP. Extreme moral flexibility combined with a lot of snake oil seems to make for their best candidate. McCain is no longer a "top tier" candidate according to many. Will he right his 'ship' in time? I seriously doubt it.

Posted by: Judge C. Crater | July 11, 2007 8:53 AM | Report abuse

I dunno, CoastalConservative. I think Ron Paul is the most "consistent conservative" in the race.

Posted by: JohnW | July 11, 2007 6:46 AM | Report abuse

I find this very sad, even though the situation is consistent w/ basic theory of life, which is: Things undertaken for bad reasons rarely turn out well.

McCain lost the support of people who respected his independence for toadying up to the religious right and supporting GWB in the 2004 election. And he gave up that support w/o gaining the support of the religious right, who did not buy his "conversion".

If he hadn't weakened himself in those ways, I believe he might have been able to find more support for his views on the Iraq war and immigration.

Again, very sad. I view him as one more casualty of the Bush administration.

Posted by: THS | July 11, 2007 1:51 AM | Report abuse

McCain is toast, and the ship that seemed unstoppable not so long ago is now largely deserted.

IMO He'll hang on for a little while, and then pull out with a bitter speech criticising the fact that politics does not reward people of principle. He won't endorse anyone, his chances of even an Administration spot are remote.

Where will his votes go? He was supported by a broad range of people, although predominantly those independents who liked his maverick image. Those people are likely to switch to the social liberal Rudy. Maybe a few will go to Thompson or Brownback (those who felt he was the 'real' conservative in the top 3).

Posted by: JayPe | July 11, 2007 1:20 AM | Report abuse

I agree with Mark in Austin. John McCain is the most consistent conservative in the race and the only true leader amongst this crowd of politicians.

He has taken STRONG positions of leadership on the war in Iraq. Leaving is a short sighted plan for failure and will weaken our country.

He has taken STRONG positions of leadership on securing our border and ensuring that the millions of illegal immigrants in our country have a process of being identified. Leaving the status quo in place is a failure of leadership and again, another example of politicians trying to win favor of the day with the media class, pundits, and liberal left.

I hope that Senator McCain will bring back Carla Eudy to take over his campaign finance operation. She was not the problem.

Give McCain some room to retool and I promise you when he hits the ground, he'll be stronger and better than before.

These changes were LONG overdue and many of us loyal supporters of John McCain are actually quite relieved by some of these changes.

Posted by: Coastal Conservative | July 10, 2007 11:58 PM | Report abuse

Also, do you want to re-open the discussion of the Bush family's Nazi connections?
Or how about Mitt Romney's grandfather's three wives?
Or, for that matter, Rudy's three wives, the last of whom was cut loose publicly, at a press conference?

You've been working hard. Why not relax with a movie?

Lighten up... FRANCIS.

Posted by: Anonymous | July 10, 2007 11:35 PM | Report abuse

So, Francis, is Moulitsas a candidate now? No? In that case, how is that relevant?

Posted by: Anonymous | July 10, 2007 11:31 PM | Report abuse

Mark, I don't think anyone else in the GOP field has what it takes to be a good president.
If Giuliani wins, it will be because he was successful in scaring at least 51% of us.
If Romney wins, it will be because he bought the office in some way... either that, or because he tied the Democratic candidate to the roof of a car and had him driven to a secure, undisclosed location.

Posted by: Bokonon | July 10, 2007 11:30 PM | Report abuse

More interesting is the controversy on the Democratic side, with the new "Truth About Kos Blog." The blog says that the family of Markos Alberto Moulitsas ZÚNIGA is far wealthier than "Kos" ever let on. And now Kos admits that he spent 6 months training with the CIA in 2001!

And, it turns out that Kos isn't even an immigrant as he claimed (he was born in Chicago).

Plus, someone listed as the "manager" of the Kos "family business" hotel where Kos honeymooned (Carlos Alberto Delgado ZÚÑIGA) in El Salvador is also listed in websites as a board member of the ANEP (National Association of Private Corporations) which the CIA calls a right-wing "political pressure group" that is implicated in death squad activities.

The same Carlos Alberto Delgado ZÚÑIGA listed as "manager" at Kos' family hotel is listed as the "owner" of Baja Salt, a well-known polluter of grey whale spawning grounds in Baja Mexico. Who would have expected all of this from progressive Kos?

Posted by: Francis L. Holland | July 10, 2007 11:28 PM | Report abuse

[and Simon...]

Posted by: Mark in Austin | July 10, 2007 11:18 PM | Report abuse

It is not truly fair to equate McCain, who exposed the crooked lobbyist Abramoff, who fought the good fight on torture, and who is the 57th most liberal or 44th most conservative Senator, with GWB. I know he deserves criticism for pandering to the social conservatives, who hate him anyway, and for backing off his principled position against the second round of Bush tax cuts with the lame excuse that if they expire it would be a tax increase.

All that said, he is the only candidate from either house of Congress who did not even submit any earmarks, as a matter of principle.

His campaign has foundered on his support of the surge and his support of the immigration bill and his inability to control the burn rate of his money. He remains the only R who has any foreign policy experience and the ability to reach across the aisle to Ds.

Who else is there, Bokonon and Judge, on the R side, to give you any hope that the nearly 50% chance that the next Prez is an R would not end up being a disaster?

Posted by: Mark in Austin | July 10, 2007 11:17 PM | Report abuse

Agreed, Bokonon. Hanging on until the bitter end is McCain's MO.

Endorsement? The remaining "top tier" GOP candidates would all immediately tell ol' Johnny boy "NO THANKS!" More of a curse than a blessing given all those hard feelings still swirling around a confused and battered McCain.

Besides, McCain would probably never endorse anyone with such pronounced flip flops on the abortion issue. I give HIM credit for being consistent in his beliefs.

Posted by: Judge C. Crater | July 10, 2007 10:59 PM | Report abuse

if McCain drops out, whom will he endorse? Not prettyboy Romney, and not crusty old Rudy. My guess would be Thompson, although at this point I wonder if his endorsement would carry much weight.

But in any case, my guess is he doesn't drop out before the fall.

Posted by: Bokonon | July 10, 2007 10:53 PM | Report abuse

This is the beginning of the end for McCain. The maverick captain of the straight talk express of 2000 has been replaced with the Bush parroting, pandering, ineffective old man

Also, in before inevitable off topic posts!

Posted by: Simon | July 10, 2007 10:08 PM | Report abuse

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