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Bailout Fallout: Can Republicans Stage a Comeback?

The House vote to pass a $700 billion rescue plan for the financial industry likely brings to an end the two worst weeks of John McCain's general election campaign for the presidency.

The debacle for McCain began with the collapse of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, continued through his decision to suspend his campaign to come back to Washington to deal with the issue and peaked with the House's rejection of the initial bailout package on Monday, a defeat largely blamed on Republicans.

During that two-week (or so) period, McCain watched as his poll numbers -- both nationally and in key battleground states -- plummeted. The dive in his numbers led McCain's campaign to pull out of Michigan, a state expected to be a critical battleground in the contest, earlier this week -- a decision that continues to shrink the playing field of pickup opportunities for the Republican nominee.

With the rescue package now through Congress and signed by President Bush in short order, McCain must now hope that it works as intended -- buying up bad loans and stabilizing the financial giants. And, for McCain to have the sort of bounce-back that polls suggest he needs, the bailout must also work quickly -- showing results in time for voters to refocus on other matters in the final week (or so) before Nov. 4.

That's a lot of "ifs," but in an election cycle like this one, where the playing field is badly slanted against McCain and Congressional Republicans, the triple-bank shot may be their only shot at winning.

New polling released by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research, a Democratic polling firm, for Democracy Corps suggests that -- while things look dark currently for Republicans -- there may be room for a comeback by the party on the bailout.

The poll, which was conducted in 50 Republican-held district that are playing host to competitive contests this fall, showed voters equally divided between the Democratic and Republican candidate as to who would "do a better job" addressing the "financial crisis in the country."

McCain -- and downballot Republicans -- must hope that with the bill now enacted, voters look to what's next for the economy as opposed to what just happened in the last two weeks. (Poll after poll -- including the Post's own -- shows voters blamed Republicans by a two-to-one margin over Democrats for the legislation's failure earlier this week.)

Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, during last night's debate, trotted out the "forward not the past" line several times during last night's vice presidential debate -- a strategy born of necessity given the damaged Republican brand and the erosion of the party's ballot position over the last few weeks.

The question is whether -- as Sen. Joe Biden argued last night -- "past is prologue." If so, there is little hope for either McCain or downballot Republicans running for the Senate and House. They simply cannot win a race that is a referendum on the economy.

By Chris Cillizza  |  October 3, 2008; 4:34 PM ET
Categories:  Economy Watch , Eye on 2008  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Sarah Palin, St. Louis and 2012
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Comments

If this is the best McCain can do, he's lost. not a strong performance at all.

Obama wins a tie and it looks a tie again.

Brokaw is good.... much better than Awful, er Ifil.

Posted by: wpost4112 | October 7, 2008 9:21 PM | Report abuse

Where things stand: O up 12 nationally, up 7 in OH -- DailyKos.

Maureen Dowd's take today on the Palin performance last Thursday is great. (Note to Gwen Awf-, er, Ifill: when you ask about major issues like the Palestinian conflict and the candidate in effect announces she will not be answering any of your questions and then proceeds to give a series of "shout-outs" to third graders, you have officially lost all control as moderator and you need to exit the room safely and quietly.)

Excerpt from Dowd today:

"With her pompom patois and sing-songy jingoism, Palin can bridge contradictory ideas that lead nowhere: One minute she promises to get “greater oversight” by government; the next, she lectures: “Government, you know, you’re not always a solution. In fact, too often you’re the problem.”

Talking at the debate about how she would “positively affect the impacts” of the climate change for which she’s loath to acknowledge human culpability, she did a dizzying verbal loop-de-loop: “With the impacts of climate change, what we can do about that, as governor, I was the first governor to form a climate change subcabinet to start dealing with the impacts.” That was, miraculously, richer with content than an answer she gave Katie Couric: “You know, there are man’s activities that can be contributed to the issues that we’re dealing with now, with these impacts.”

At another point, she channeled Alicia Silverstone debating in “Clueless,” asserting, “Nuclear weaponry, of course, would be the be-all, end-all of just too many people in too many parts of our planet.” (Mostly the end-all.)

A political jukebox, she drowned out Biden’s specifics, offering lifestyle as substance. “In the middle class of America, which is where Todd and I have been, you know, all our lives,” she said, making the middle class sound like it has its own ZIP code, superior to 90210 because “real” rules.

Sometimes, her sentences have a Yoda-like — “When 900 years old you reach, look as good you will not” — splendor. When she was asked by Couric if she’d ever negotiated with the Russians, the governor replied that when Putin “rears his head” he is headed for Alaska. Then she uttered yet another sentence that defies diagramming: “It is from Alaska that we send those out to make sure that an eye is being kept on this very powerful nation, Russia, because they are right there.”"

Posted by: broadwayjoe | October 5, 2008 8:25 AM | Report abuse

Tina Fey delivered ANOTHER dead on impression of Palin tonight!

WOW!
Another loss for the McCain/Palin ticket tonight.

Maybe it's a shame that many voters get the majority of their political info from pop culture such as SNL.

But after watching the pundits let Palin off the hook for her ridiculous performance in the VP debate where she lost and lost big, I'm actually thankful we have SNL to call out the obvious 'take aways' from the VP debate that the so called analysts missed on CNN and FOX "News".

Palin could not answer the questions that were asked of her. She regurgitated memorized talking points and spewed catch phrase after catch phrase while transparently trying to connect to average Americans with her corny folksiness. She was more UNpresidentail than any VP candidate in history... including Dan Quayle!

Thank God SNL pointed this out. Thank God for Tina Fey!

Posted by: jgarrisn | October 5, 2008 12:24 AM | Report abuse

Before either McCain or Obama throws mud they should watch Saving Our Economy. What's Next? on FOX news . It shows the history of the bailout problem. The problems start in 1977, then Freddie/Fannie and shows when Obama worked for ACORN. What is ACORN? Both Republicans and Democrats are to blame and only you will be able to intelligently assess the degree of blame. But it is a must see before you vote in this election. Just watch it, do your own research and make up your mind. It could be the end of our country as we know it. I consider this view a civic duty.

Posted by: schreff | October 4, 2008 11:47 PM | Report abuse

Palin winked, wrinkled her nose and alternately answered in a breathy tone and repeated back memorized phrases in a monotone is qualified to be the star of her own afternoon gabfest. It does not qualify her to be the Vice President.

Kay Bailey Hutchinson must spend a lot of time shaking her head and wondering why they didn't pick her instead. I know I do

Posted by: corridorg4 | October 4, 2008 11:44 PM | Report abuse

First Alec Baldwin rightfully putting the blame on the Dimocrats for this financial crisis and now the Boston Glob also telling the truth. Will wonders never cease?
From the Glob of 9/28/08

"Frank's fingerprints are all over the financial fiasco"
By Jeff Jacoby
"The roots of this crisis go back to the Carter administration. That was when government officials, egged on by left-wing activists, began accusing mortgage lenders of racism and "redlining" because urban blacks were being denied mortgages at a higher rate than suburban whites.
The pressure to make more loans to minorities (read: to borrowers with weak credit histories) became relentless. Congress passed the Community Reinvestment Act, empowering regulators to punish banks that failed to "meet the credit needs" of "low-income, minority, and distressed neighborhoods." Lenders responded by loosening their underwriting standards and making increasingly shoddy loans. The two government-chartered mortgage finance firms, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, encouraged this "subprime" lending by authorizing ever more "flexible" criteria by which high-risk borrowers could be qualified for home loans, and then buying up the questionable mortgages that ensued."
-------
Read the whole article at Boston.com

And there is more of this social engineering where the above dim-witted idea came from. Just ask that community organizer B. Obama and his socialist pals.

Posted by: zqll1 | October 4, 2008 9:25 PM | Report abuse

Thank you Officermancuso for your reply of 10/03/08 @ 9:09pm

Posted by: zqll1 | October 4, 2008 9:06 PM | Report abuse

Of course Republicans will bounce back. Republicans understand the way the market works, they understand that you can't tax people more during a recession, that cutting the corporate tax rate will actually increase revenue (because companies will come back), and that paying taxes isn't "patriotic", it's a way to raise money. Democrats will continue to raise taxes because they see it as patriotism, like Joe Biden said, even if it costs the US money. And don't get me started on their spending policies!

Posted by: njt61 | October 4, 2008 7:48 PM | Report abuse


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Why would an American be so irreponsible as to place this nation at RISK by voting for some INEXPERIENCED AFFIRMATIVE ACTION guy whose only economic or business experience is buying cocaine ???

I feel sorry for all of you.

You apparently do not care about this country's future or your children if you would like to place this great nation in DANGER by voting to put in charge such inexperienced person. I honestly believe the Obama people are being irresponsible with this Country.

The position is one of responsibility. The position is not one for on-the-job training.


We need someone who knows Washington, who has the experience and the PROVEN LEADERSHIP ABILITY TO LEAD THIS NATION OUT OF THE ECONOMIC CRISIS AND TO MAKE THIS NATION STRONG AGAIN.

.

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Posted by: 37thandOStreet | October 4, 2008 7:30 PM | Report abuse

The American people know the economic strain we are currently experiencing has occurred on Republicans' watch. Republican candidates are often so consumed with Culture War rhetoric and trying to divide ordinary people that they avoid the real issues. People are tired of electing politicians who avoid real issues. This is why this will be a huge Democratic year. The country has real problems facing it and those need to be seriously discussed and addressed. Only one party seems to realize that. The divisive Culture War issues won't work this time around because the country has real issues of consequence with which to concern itself.

Obama will win with at least 52% of the two-party vote which will translate into 320+ Electoral Votes and Democrats will gain 7-10 Senate seats, pushing the majority near or to 60.

Posted by: OHIOCITIZEN | October 4, 2008 7:27 PM | Report abuse


.


.


Why would an American be so irreponsible as to place this nation at RISK by voting for some INEXPERIENCED AFFIRMATIVE ACTION guy whose only economic or business experience is buying cocaine ???

I feel sorry for all of you.

You apparently do not care about this country's future or your children if you would like to place this great nation in DANGER by voting to put in charge such inexperienced person.

The position is one of responsibility. The position is not one for on-the-job training.


We need someone who knows Washington, who has the experience and the PROVEN LEADERSHIP ABILITY TO LEAD THIS NATION OUT OF THE ECONOMIC CRISIS AND TO MAKE THIS NATION STRONG AGAIN.

.

.

Posted by: 37thandOStreet | October 4, 2008 7:27 PM | Report abuse

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Let's get one thing straight: Wall Street was deregulated under CLINTON in 1999.


This entire disaster is a result of the banks and insurance companies wishing to keep up with the crazy returns which the internet companies appeared to be producing for investors.


In a failed attempt to keep up with the internet companies, the banks and insurance companies had their lobbyists secure the repeal of the Glass-Steagal Act which led to this week's events.

THE DEMOCRATS ARE THE ONES WHO ARE RESPONSIBLE -


Ok


Bush's Father During the first Bush Term in the early 90s "If you want this economy to look like Arkansas, Elect Bill Clinton and see what happens to our economy."

HE WAS RIGHT.

.

.

Posted by: 37thandOStreet | October 4, 2008 6:53 PM | Report abuse

No one thinks Obama is going to drag down the democratic ticket this year ???


.

Posted by: 37thandOStreet | October 4, 2008 6:15 PM | Report abuse

This woman has little room to speak given her long association, and the association of her husband, with members of the AIP, who openly advocate the secession of Alaska from the United States. Also, the leader of this organization stated, and I quote: "the fires of hell are glaciers compared to my hatred for the United States of America." This sounds worse than anything Rev. Wright ever said about the United States. Of course, a big difference is that, while Sen. Obama has publicly condemned Rev. Wright for his hateful contents, Sarah Palin has never so much as criticized the leader of the AIP for his expressed hatred of our country. The more one gets to know this woman and her associates, the more one realizes what a danger she presents to the security of our nation and the freedom of its citizens. Johnny McSame is desperate and will say anything over the next month in an effort to derail the inevitable election of Sen. Barack Obama to be President of the United States. WE CAN STOP HIM!!! Obama/Biden 2008!!!

Posted by: Caliguy55 | October 4, 2008 5:43 PM | Report abuse

Last night, at 9:09P, OfficerMancuso correctly, imo, stated that there was enough blame to go around, in the partisan sense. Yet the Ds only point to market deregulation and the Rs only point to the housing bubble,rather than admit complicity. As each decision that led to this cyclone was made, it appeared to the maker to be a way to stimulate the economy, not a contribution to an expanding bubble that would break.
For example, read how happy the interim SEC commish was to remove Shad-Johnson, creating the "Enron" exception, as a counterweight to reading about Barney's belief that ez credit for the poor was great for the economy. See:
http://www.sec.gov/news/speech/spch465.htm
My point is not to say "A pox on both your houses", however. It is to say that when a regulatory [and credit]
framework had worked for 12 years, 1988-2000, constant tinkering around the edges, supported not by small business and individual investors but by the financial industries themselves, had to be viewed with caution by the pols, and it was not. The desire for quick bucks and big returns fueled massive lobbying and there is actually no one to protect us from this, as far as I can see. Somehow, going forward, we need a new paradigm, as they say, and I do not have a clue hoe to get it. The smartest people in the room will have to include some whose interests are not narrowly in short term profits. How can that be institutionalized?

Posted by: mark_in_austin | October 4, 2008 4:13 PM | Report abuse

This is where things stand right now (from Boston Globe). From here things could break wide open for O or, due to the racial junk, tighten. Most analysts seem to think -- O electoral landslide (353+)...you betcha:

Boston Globe: "With 31 days until the election, Democrat Barack Obama's road to the White House is widening, and Republican John McCain's electoral path is narrowing.

The McCain campaign's decision this week to abandon Democratic-leaning Michigan is the most obvious and dramatic sign, a major tactical retreat that limits the ways he can reach the magic number of 270 electoral votes on Nov. 4.

But McCain is in as bad or worse shape in other battleground states. Barring a dramatic change, he is on course to lose Iowa and New Mexico, both states barely won by President Bush four years ago in his narrow victory over Democrat John F. Kerry. And he and the Republican National Committee this week began pouring money into Indiana and North Carolina, reliably Republican states where the Obama campaign has made strong advances and polls indicate the candidates are roughly tied."

Posted by: broadwayjoe | October 4, 2008 2:04 PM | Report abuse

Not worth it, no one knows anything about it or cares. Same with most of that old stuff they will try to bring up about Obama made op or real.
Obama's end game is to present himself as a president, next to Mccain who looks like a old hack politician. Mccain's sleazy ad's and his demeanor will just confirm what Obama will be trying to paint as. Mccain is like a guy sitting in a poker game who just had his bluff called. He turns over his cards and there is nothing there.

---------------
now that mccain is planning ads about obama's "associations," obama and some independent groups had better make Charles Keating into mccain's running mate. i would like to hear about nothing other than mccain and the Keating Five between today and election day. let's go!

Posted by: comments99 | October 4, 2008 12:33 AM | Report abuse

Posted by: popasmoke | October 4, 2008 12:32 PM | Report abuse

We finally have something to thank George W. Bush for......
Thank you for loosing the Presidential Campaign for McCain/Palin.
We couldn't have done it "with-out-cha" as simple Sarah would say!

Posted by: LMALESKO | October 4, 2008 12:12 PM | Report abuse

People like you are the reason Mccain is going to lose. They didn't face realities in the campaign much like you. Mccain had three months while Hillary and Obama were killing each other to actually win this. He could have put together a political machine like Obama did. Instead Mccain did nothing, for three months. Mccain ran an historically bad lackluster campaign that was a joke and I suspect is surrounded by people like you who don't have a clue. Nothing you have done or said on these blogs has aided your candidate one bit. When this is over you will all have yourselves to blame for the loss. This was a winnable election for Mccain. Not easy but not impossible and you all blew it.


-------------
Rick

Sarah Palin is the one who is getting all the attention now - Biden might as well been a potted plant.


Obama is yesterday's fad.


What are you talking about - the television ratings for Sarah Palin are through the roof - the Obama paid staffers can not lie about that.


.

Posted by: 37thandOStreet | October 4, 2008 7:12 AM | Report abuse

Posted by: popasmoke | October 4, 2008 12:09 PM | Report abuse

It won't work, Mccain will become even more disliked and it will galvanize Obama's base and move voters to Obama. If Mccain can't show he is a better product it is over for him. Trying to tarnish Obama is not enough. Obama has been withstanding these attacks for a year. In fact, the Obama campaign is going to shift almost completely positive ad's featuring Obama just talking to the people 1 and 2 minuter ad's. Like any good salesman he is now going to make the close. The final contrast will be stark. A very presidential Obama sitting in your living room laying out his case to the American people. Then you will have Mccain all over the place making up lies negative ad's trying to win in any way he can. It will be a real contrast that the Obama campaign knows will work. The contrast will be one man presenting himself as a president and the other looking in the end like a desperate hack politician. In the end, Mccain played right into their hands.


-------------
Most indications are that the GOP campaign, lacking alternatives, will go to new depths of negativity in the time remaining. McCain himself hints he'll be in rabid attack mode in the next debate.

My guess is it's too late to accomplish much with a slash and burn approach, and many who have come to accept Obama as a plausible president will be turned off buy the smears. The Obama ground game looks strong enough to overcome any remaining Bradley effect, and there's no hint of complacency among the Democrats. The only thing Republicans can accomplish now is the destruction of whatever respect the public still has for their candidate – that, and creation of enough ill will to lose a couple more Senate seats.

Posted by: FlownOver | October 4, 2008 7:54 AM | Report abuse

Posted by: popasmoke | October 4, 2008 11:57 AM | Report abuse

This crises is not over, things will get worse before they get better and we are one month out from the election. It was Mccain's erratic and seeming all over the place behavior that did the damage. It was a chance to see Mccain in a crises and he did two things. One was to shoot from the hip without much thought. The second was to obviously not put country first, but try to exploits it for political gain. It was a lose lose for Mccain and is not repairable. For many independents it was what it took to move them to Obama. The numbers will not be jumping around anymore. They are beginning to harden and people are getting comfortable with their decisions. In a bad marriage people often live together for years. Then the day comes when something is said or done that can't be taken back or apologized for. That one last insult or act. Mccain has reached the point with many voters. For many voters they have been saying they were just waiting for Obama to close the deal. Mccain did it for him the last two weeks.

Posted by: popasmoke | October 4, 2008 11:46 AM | Report abuse

Throw out the bums! McCain included as he has so little new to offer

Posted by: nclwtk | October 4, 2008 11:06 AM | Report abuse

Electoral Polls show O with 353, and ahead in every battleground state but MO, even ahead in NC. Ramussen, the most anti-O poll, has O ahead by 7, post debate.

Had Gwen Awful, er, Ifill not forgotten how to moderate a debate on Thursday, this would now be over. (Hey, Gwen Ifill, this message from George C. Scott (as Bert in "the Hustler") -- Don't be walking into a big time TV debate again.) Even Soupy Sales knows to ask followup questions. Gwen, contact the registrar at Northern Virginia Community College -- there is an opening in the Saturday morning Journalism 101 class this semester just for you.

BUT in today's Washington Post, O's opponent has signaled they will be using the ultimate trump card, the r- card (transferred to Mac by HRC). However the ground reports are that that won't work this time (a DailyKos poster said his bowling alleys friends are totally pro-O); the stakes are too great for the nation and the World. So for the next 30 days hold on to your horses.

Over the next few weeks, count on non-stop racial junk: he's-a-Muslim, fistbumps, emails from Scarlett Johnasen, he's-a-celebrity, Rev. Wright, Ayres, Resko, the non-existent "Whitey" tape (the Beave said that all the time so what's the problem?), the guy in O's choir that died, O's middle name, cameo appearances on Faux News by Ed Rendell and G. Ferraro, one-hour anti-O specials from Hannity, who-does-that-XXXXXX-think he-is, etc., etc.

This race is an SAT test for America, let's see if they ace it.

Posted by: broadwayjoe | October 4, 2008 9:38 AM | Report abuse

I didn't watch the debates, instead I listened to them. Both Biden and Palin dodged some questions. The difference I heard was that when Biden dodged he still make some specific points and sounded like a seasoned politician with a well defined agenda.

When Palin dodged, she sounded as if she was covering up for a lack of knowledge. She did, however; do it well.

Palin did not have to do much to NOT sound like to whack job she had been in the previous week. She did a great job overcoming that. However, she did not rice to the position of a qualified VP. She sounded well coached and well rested.

Biden, though dry at times, soiunded like a VP who could if needed take off as CIC and keep the Gov. moving with TRUE COMMAND abilities.

Palin would be a puppet and that scares me to no end.


Posted by: vance1 | October 4, 2008 9:16 AM | Report abuse

Most indications are that the GOP campaign, lacking alternatives, will go to new depths of negativity in the time remaining. McCain himself hints he'll be in rabid attack mode in the next debate.

My guess is it's too late to accomplish much with a slash and burn approach, and many who have come to accept Obama as a plausible president will be turned off buy the smears. The Obama ground game looks strong enough to overcome any remaining Bradley effect, and there's no hint of complacency among the Democrats. The only thing Republicans can accomplish now is the destruction of whatever respect the public still has for their candidate – that, and creation of enough ill will to lose a couple more Senate seats.

Posted by: FlownOver | October 4, 2008 7:54 AM | Report abuse

CC, IT WOULD TAKE A LOT!

Americans are emotionally driven. When they see fire they try to get as far away from it and anyone associated with it as possible. Unfortunately, they have gotten so far away from the fire they are innocently heading into the middle of the ocean with Sen. Barack. What they need is balance which is McCain/Palin.

Posted by: oldgirl1 | October 4, 2008 7:18 AM | Report abuse

Rick

Sarah Palin is the one who is getting all the attention now - Biden might as well been a potted plant.


Obama is yesterday's fad.


What are you talking about - the television ratings for Sarah Palin are through the roof - the Obama paid staffers can not lie about that.


.

Posted by: 37thandOStreet | October 4, 2008 7:12 AM | Report abuse

"And while all us progressives are anticipating that this will happen, so far only New Mexico and Iowa look like good candidates. If McCain can pick off Pennsylvania or Minnesota or Wisconsin, he will almost make up for that loss.(Much more so if the casualty is Pennsylvania) So this thing is far from over and those of us who have some small part of working in the trenches need to stay on top of things and not get carried away with premature celebrations."

It is pretty unlikely that McCain is going to take any Kerry state. He is polling pretty poorly in all of them (two double digit deficits for him in NH today).

If McCain can't take a Kerry state and Obama is very solid in Iowa and NM, then that means he need take only one more Bush state. Which one? I'm not sure, but Obama is working all of the tossups. I really doubt he will lose all of them.

But yeah, this isn't over yet. McCain doesn't seem likely to win simply through the normal political game. He needs something that will turn the national sentiment against Obama. Most likely, this is something beyond his control. McCain's best bet is to just hang close and see if Obama implodes. It is doubtful this will happen, but it's all the Arizona Senator has. McCain can't fight a national tide in a bunch of states. He has to have a change of the tide.

The thing that is lost is that Obama is an excellent campaigner. The more he interacts with people, the more they grow to love the guy. People talk about how he lost Pennsylvania to Clinton, but what is lost is the fact that he cut a 20 point lead in half through an extended campaign there. (the opposite is true as well. In the last few states where he didn't bother to campaign, Clinton demolished him)

But no one is taking anything for granted. Obama has some excellent organizers working for him in the swing states and they are not resting until the last ballot is cast. I know people in some really red states and they have plans to stay up for the last three days straight to get Obama every last vote. If the red staters have this attitude, imagine what the purple staters are feeling.

Posted by: DDAWD | October 4, 2008 7:03 AM | Report abuse

The voters are starting to tune out McCain and Palin. The bailout will not magically transform anything in the near-term and there's still much pain to come. Layoffs will continue and prices will rise over the next six months. Voter angst will increase until the election. And McCain's answer seems to be character assassination of Obama... Not much of a strategy at this point.

Posted by: RickJ | October 4, 2008 5:46 AM | Report abuse

Michigan means nothing! It was a Kerry state in 04. Let's not forget that McCain can win this election by holding on to the states that were won by Bush in 2004 (or 2000 for that matter)It is Obama that needs to pick up at least one more state. And while all us progressives are anticipating that this will happen, so far only New Mexico and Iowa look like good candidates. If McCain can pick off Pennsylvania or Minnesota or Wisconsin, he will almost make up for that loss.(Much more so if the casualty is Pennsylvania) So this thing is far from over and those of us who have some small part of working in the trenches need to stay on top of things and not get carried away with premature celebrations. It's much too soon for that. A lot can happen in a month. Hell six weeks ago we would have said "Who the heck is Sara Pelin."

Posted by: Opa2 | October 4, 2008 2:29 AM | Report abuse

Mccain and Palin like to talk about government being on the side of the people but Mccain has never been on the side of the people just like now he's always were for the rich and wealthy. Mccain also is the biggest to blame for the deregulation on Wall St. which is what the keaten 5 scandal was all about. Watch for yourselves. The real Mccain and how he help create the biggest federal bailout in history. Nothing about Mccain is change just more of the same.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HAzDEbVFcg8&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TM2OYd1hBc

Posted by: amosdefnails | October 4, 2008 2:28 AM | Report abuse

Allot of the pundits are talking about Mccain becoming very negative this week, even bringing up past associations. This is totally a coward move. All Mccain has to do is get a plan. Why is it so hard for Mccain to get a plan for working class Americans? Instead Mccain would rather change the subject and bring up past associations? Rev. Wright, What does Rev. Wright has to do with the biggest federal bailout in history? I tell you who does have something to do with the biggest bailout in history, Mccain. Remember the keaten 5 scandal. We'll Mccain and Mr. Keaten were very good friends they and their families went on numerous vacations together and Cindy Mccain had allot of investments tied up with the Mr. Keaten business. Why was Mccain in such hot water with Mr. Keaten which is better known as the Keaten 5, because Mccain was one of the senators accused of pressing regulators not to go after a savings and loans with Charles Keaten. Mccain has a history with deregulation and the Keaten 5 scandal was about deregulation for Mr. Charles Keaten which relates to our economic crisis of a lack of regulation on Wall St. So if Mccain want to really change the subject bring up past associations in Mccain's case relates directly to our current situation and is soley the main concern on Americans minds. If Mccain think Rev. Wright or Tony Rezco will defeat his Keaten 5 scandal and the charges of deregulation which has helped lead to the bigges federal bailout in history is a big mistake. A huge mistake. If Mccain is looking for a game changer past associations is not it for Mccain because his past associations and what it involved leads up to our curren crisis and Mccain should be greatful Obama and his surrogates didn't make the charge but they will if Mccain brings up past associations. Besides, it will bring up the Witch hunter pastor of Gov. Palin inwhich prayed witch like sermons while praying over her. Theres footage of this witch hunter pastor and Palin who deemed a local woman in his native land a witch. Also, it would bring up Pastor Hagar and others. it would be so much easier if Mccain had an economic plan because I don't think Americans are interested in this when 750,000 people have lost their jobs and seen their pensions and 401k decreased but if Mccain is willing to say and do what ever it takes to win an election, he is gauranteed to lose so maybe he should stoop to the lowest levels of his campaign and honor. KEEP MCCAIN/PALIN OUT OF THE WHITE HOUSE. WE NEED SOLUTIONS NOT DISTRACTIONS.

Posted by: amosdefnails | October 4, 2008 2:16 AM | Report abuse

The bailout-rescue-whatever you wish to call it - is triage at best. The economic fundamentals established by the long-term Republican borrow-and-spend policies and wink-wink--nod-nod approach to regulation are simply disastrous. Turning the fundamentals takes time and they are SO bad that it'll probably take longer than a single presidential term to fully recover. McCain is toast and the electoral margin is likely to be "mandate" large.

Fantasy scenario of the day? Republican Party fractures and the offshoot is that the the social conservative Christianists break off into their own fringe party, then mix that with a merger of the few remaining fiscal-conservative Republicans with the blue-dog Democrats as paleo-Republicans (MUCH better than the neo- variety), gently fold in a party of social liberals, season generously with greens and libertarians and we might actually end up with content-based discussions of issues!

So sad that our electoral system is incapable of supporting multiple parties in the way that parliamentary systems do. Oh well - I'll lay off the cool-aid starting tomorrow.

Posted by: fr3dmars | October 4, 2008 1:34 AM | Report abuse

Sure the Republicans can comeback.

As long as we all pretend like they have a clue.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ycdgJoN5H8

Posted by: sobugged | October 4, 2008 1:24 AM | Report abuse

"I still think, as I've thought for some time, that the GOP is ready to fracture. I think any loss would do it, though a big loss will probably do it most quickly."

Well, let's take a baseball team that misses the playoffs by one game, perhaps a tiebreaker. What does the team do? Perhaps add a power hitter, a good closer, or a good defensive shortstop. If the team is young, maybe nothing at all. If the team is back by twenty games, the team needs to be blown up. Everything must be rethought. Old players let go for fresh blood.

Same thing with the election. If in such a favorable environment for Democrats, Obama can only garner 269 votes, Republicans won't be rethinking their platform or rethinking their strategy. Perhaps get a candidate who is better than McCain, but you won't see the Republicans losing trickle down philosphy orstopping the negative attack ads or veering away from the evangelical base.

If Obama can get in the area of 340 votes, its not to say the Republicans are going to abandon any of all of their platform, but they will think long and hard about it. Democrats haven't changed a LOT of their platform, but some of the philosophy has changed. Democrats are a lot more assertive than they have been in the past. No attack goes unchallenged. This is a stark difference from Kerry. Democrats have gotten a very good politician and have realized that issues alone don't win elections.

I have a feeling the election is going to be a blowout. That would be best to bring the Republicans closer to the Democrats rather than they thinking the status quo is intact and just a tweak and homefield advantage away from a victory in four years.

Posted by: DDAWD | October 4, 2008 12:56 AM | Report abuse

I don't see the bailout turning things around for at least 4-5 months. Meanwhile, the numbers will not be good. Sarah's Alaska investigation report will be out in a week, the Justice Department fiasco will grab a few headlines, and the early voting states are already in the bag for Obama. I think McCain will resort to dirty tactics, Palin will be hidden away from the press and trotted out only to "dog-gone-right" crowds that have already made up their collective minds. The toast is burning! Personally, I think McCain is close to his mental breaking point - this campaign has taken a heavy toll on him already. One or two more interviews like the one he did in Des Moines will have even the faithful ready to throw in the towel.

Posted by: BlueDog3 | October 4, 2008 12:42 AM | Report abuse

now that mccain is planning ads about obama's "associations," obama and some independent groups had better make Charles Keating into mccain's running mate. i would like to hear about nothing other than mccain and the Keating Five between today and election day. let's go!

Posted by: comments99 | October 4, 2008 12:33 AM | Report abuse

adamgray writes
"One thing that could hurt McCain in the remaining weeks is the bill he's just urged everyone to vote for contains substantial amounts of pork - you remember, the stuff he's utterly opposed to and would never support."

Yup. This one is going to bite him in the butt before its all said and done. Played right, it could make for an interesting debate moment.

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 3, 2008 10:22 PM | Report abuse

mark in austin writes
"Here is my horseshoe toss as to what the bailout debate teaches us: the coalitions that make up both our major political parties are FRAGILE. A close race will probably tend to cement those fragile pieces together for another four years, but a blowout might lead to the fragmentation of either or both parties."

I still think, as I've thought for some time, that the GOP is ready to fracture. I think any loss would do it, though a big loss will probably do it most quickly. What I have not considered is the possibility of a big win wiping out the Dems. I would expect, after a session of Dem single-party rule, many of the same problems that plagued the Repubs from 2002-2006 - hubris, overreach, K street projects and plans for 'permanent' majorities.

I think Mark in Austin's hypothesis bears consideration. If Obama wins big, which I expect he will; and if the GOP undergoes drastic reengineering, which I expect it will, it is quite possible that a reborn, moderate GOP could start chipping off certain groups of Dems. For instance, if an Obama administration panders to the protectionist wing (I don't expect that), the free traders/internationalists could start siding with a moderate GOP, in certain situations. It would take time, probably more than one Congress, before such new coalitions would begin forming.

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 3, 2008 10:17 PM | Report abuse

i agree McLame is toast....your defense of palin on hardball was embarassing! you should be ashamed of yourself!

Posted by: douglechleiter | October 3, 2008 9:33 PM | Report abuse

zqll1, as to your recent post, I believe you stand on solid ground there. It should be balanced with the NYTimes article by Stephen Labaton, entitled "Agency’s ’04 Rule Let Banks Pile Up New Debt".

There is indeed blame that ought to be apportioned to Democrats, for urging the writing of subprime mortgages as a matter of social policy, and Republicans, for urging the SEC and other regulatory agencies to get off the capitalists' back.

Posted by: officermancuso | October 3, 2008 9:09 PM | Report abuse

From ireport.com

"From the Congressional Record:

FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE REGULATORY REFORM ACT OF 2005
The United States Senate
May 25, 2006
Sen. John McCain [R-AZ]: Mr. President, this week Fannie Mae's regulator reported that the company's quarterly reports of profit growth over the past few years were "illusions deliberately and systematically created" by the company's senior management, which resulted in a $10.6 billion accounting scandal.
The Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight's report goes on to say that Fannie Mae employees deliberately and intentionally manipulated financial reports to hit earnings targets in order to trigger bonuses for senior executives. In the case of Franklin Raines, Fannie Mae's former chief executive officer, OFHEO's report shows that over half of Mr. Raines' compensation for the 6 years through 2003 was directly tied to meeting earnings targets. The report of financial misconduct at Fannie Mae echoes the deeply troubling $5 billion profit restatement at Freddie Mac.
The OFHEO report also states that Fannie Mae used its political power to lobby Congress in an effort to interfere with the regulator's examination of the company's accounting problems. This report comes some weeks after Freddie Mac paid a record $3.8 million fine in a settlement with the Federal Election Commission and restated lobbying disclosure reports from 2004 to 2005. These are entities that have demonstrated over and over again that they are deeply in need of reform.
For years I have been concerned about the regulatory structure that governs Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac-known as Government-sponsored entities or GSEs-and the sheer magnitude of these companies and the role they play in the housing market. OFHEO's report this week does nothing to ease these concerns. In fact, the report does quite the contrary. OFHEO's report solidifies my view that the GSEs need to be reformed without delay.
I join as a cosponsor of the Federal Housing Enterprise Regulatory Reform Act of 2005, S. 190, to underscore my support for quick passage of GSE regulatory reform legislation. If Congress does not act, American taxpayers will continue to be exposed to the enormous risk that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac pose to the housing market, the overall financial system, and the economy as a whole.
I urge my colleagues to support swift action on this GSE reform legislation."

"Alas, thanks to the Democrat Party and the special interests of the left, both of these attempts to reform the banking system were still born."


Posted by: zqll1 | October 3, 2008 9:05 PM | Report abuse

Old Barney was probably too busy with his boy-toy procurement business to pay much attention to what was going on around him at work.

Posted by: zqll1 | October 3, 2008 8:58 PM | Report abuse

Talking about the past here is what was reported in the NY Times in 2003:
"The Bush administration today recommended the most significant regulatory overhaul in the housing finance industry since the savings and loan crisis a decade ago.
Under the plan, disclosed at a Congressional hearing today, a new agency would be created within the Treasury Department to assume supervision of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the government-sponsored companies that are the two largest players in the mortgage lending industry.
Significant details must still be worked out before Congress can approve a bill. Among the groups denouncing the proposal today were the National Association of Home Builders and Congressional Democrats who fear that tighter regulation of the companies could sharply reduce their commitment to financing low-income and affordable housing."
"These two entities - Fannie Mae
and Freddie Mac - are not facing
any kind of financial crisis," said
Representative Barney Frank of
Massachusetts, the ranking
Democrat on the Financial
Services Committee. "The more
people exaggerate these
problems, the more pressure
there is on these companies, the
less we will see in terms of
affordable housing."
Representative Melvin L. Watt,
Democrat of North Carolina,
agreed."

Posted by: zqll1 | October 3, 2008 8:56 PM | Report abuse

Texan2007 wrote, "Did you say 700 Billion? This is nothing but spending a little pocket change if Obama is elected. With tax and spend 1 TRILLION Obama combined with a majority Democrat House AND Senate, America would have given Obama ONE BIG BLANK CHECK."

I doubt that deficit reduction will be on any intelligent person's top list of priorities for the U.S. federal government during the next two years.

Dubya inherited a surplus and squandered it during a period of prosperity. And Dubya was just bad enough that he left his successor with the worst economic mess since the Great Depression - and a massive deficit.

If I want any noise out of Texas Republicans about how Democrats will save the country from that mess, I'll squeeze their Texas Republican heads.

Posted by: officermancuso | October 3, 2008 8:47 PM | Report abuse

Bud0 posted:

"'Sarah Palin, during last night's debate, trotted out the "forward not the past" line several times during last night's vice presidential debate -- a strategy born of necessity given the damaged Republican brand...'"

"Yes, forget the last eight years and vote Republican.

"Amnesiacs for McCain!"

So true. How transparent a debating ploy, to accuse anyone who brings up the world historically abysmal record of George W. Bush, in the election which will replace him, of being "backward-looking". They really are desperate, and lack scruples.


Posted by: officermancuso | October 3, 2008 8:42 PM | Report abuse

One thing that could hurt McCain in the remaining weeks is the bill he's just urged everyone to vote for contains substantial amounts of pork - you remember, the stuff he's utterly opposed to and would never support.

Of course, the argument is that this bill had to pass and that when he's President he'll do all he can to outlaw it, but he can no longer claim that he's consistently voted against earmarks.

Posted by: adamgray | October 3, 2008 8:38 PM | Report abuse

Did you say 700 Billion? This is nothing but spending a little pocket change if Obama is elected. With tax and spend 1 TRILLION Obama combined with a majority Democrat House AND Senate, America would have given Obama ONE BIG BLANK CHECK.

Posted by: Texan2007 | October 3, 2008 8:34 PM | Report abuse

wpost, I cannot tell whether you agree or disagree that the bailout will not effect the 2008 GE. I understand that an inspiring leader can motivate us to effect change - was that your only point?

=====================

ah.

I think the "bail out" will have no effect on the 2008 GE. It's effect, or lack thereof, will not be felt/noticed in full until 2009.

I was looking beyond November.

Posted by: wpost4112 | October 3, 2008 8:24 PM | Report abuse

wpost, I cannot tell whether you agree or disagree that the bailout will not effect the 2008 GE. I understand that an inspiring leader can motivate us to effect change - was that your only point?

Posted by: mark_in_austin | October 3, 2008 7:42 PM | Report abuse

MinA opined:
I do not think that the bailout itself is significant for the 2008 GE. What is significant is the economic and financial and job instability that will continue. The bailout effect will not be seen in an economic turnaround by November. The hoped for effect is to dampen the amplitude of the recession and to shorten our time in the pit.

----------

And no one thought the Berlin wall would fall.

There is always the human unknown...esp the effects of good leadership...

We must learn to ignore the hyperbolism of the media and acknowledge the reality we experience while holding to hope for a better future...as we work to make it happen.

We can always make a positive impact regardless of the environnent.

Look what a carpenter who lived in one of the most brutal and repressive totalitarian regimes in history effected.

Posted by: wpost4112 | October 3, 2008 7:20 PM | Report abuse

Here's a prediction. Sarah Palin won't be back in 2012, she'll be thoroughly discredited by then.

Why?

Her information processing algorithms don't allow for the fact that some flaw in her own views led her to Waterloo. She is on a mission from God, and will only be able to process her huge November defeat by blaming it on others - and in doing so, she'll lose whatever credibility she has left.

I wouldn't put it past her to become the next David Brock.

Posted by: officermancuso | October 3, 2008 7:15 PM | Report abuse

No. The bailout is nothing more than an extortion job by Bush and lawmakers. Taxpayers were shaken down for $700 billion for Wall Street and $150 billion more in pure pork for lawmakers.

The bailout doesn't bring back the more than 600,000 jobs lost this year.

The bailout doesn't restore the full $1.2+ trillion in value lost in our retirement accounts, mutual accounts, and personal savings accounts.

The bailout doesn't bring gas and food prices back to the level it was just a year ago.

The bailout doesn't bring home equity back up to the level it was just last year.

The bailout doesn't stop the thousands of home foreclosures under way.

The bailout doesn't pull the economy out of the recession.

The bailout doesn't end the Iraqi war and the $10 billion a month cost.

All of these problems happened under the leadership of a republican president. McCain is a republican. Why in name's hell would we send another republican to the White House?

Posted by: jandcgall1 | October 3, 2008 7:13 PM | Report abuse

I was home sick today and watched CSpan. As I listened to the short speeches of the Congresspersons I heard the themes of the "aginners" on the left and right.

Here is my horseshoe toss as to what the bailout debate teaches us: the coalitions that make up both our major political parties are FRAGILE. A close race will probably tend to cement those fragile pieces together for another four years, but a blowout might lead to the fragmentation of either or both parties.

I do not think that the bailout itself is significant for the 2008 GE. What is significant is the economic and financial and job instability that will continue. The bailout effect will not be seen in an economic turnaround by November. The hoped for effect is to dampen the amplitude of the recession and to shorten our time in the pit.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | October 3, 2008 6:57 PM | Report abuse

During the past eight days Obama has held to a consistent minimum five per cent advantage in Rasmussen daily tracking polls - and Rasmussen is a Republican-friendly pollster. Currently his lead in that poll stands at seven per cent.

If those numbers hold up - and they're still trending higher for Obama - they could easily translate into an electoral college landslide.

The Republican party has richly earned such an event. Hopefully they will receive a fair wage on election day.

Posted by: officermancuso | October 3, 2008 6:49 PM | Report abuse

For what it is worth,
on intrade Mccain is now in the 20's. The lowest he has been since January. Obama is now in the 70's the highest he has ever been since intrade has been tracking the election.

Posted by: popasmoke | October 3, 2008 6:42 PM | Report abuse

A triple bank shot? That's not risky at all! Picking Palin as VP, now that was risky. Suspending your campaign to grandstand in DC hoping to take credit for a bill so bad, that a bipartisan coalition of left and right wing extremist joined to kill it, that's risky. Claiming to be a 'maverick' 9% of the time, that's risky. Putting this erratic, reckless, nut-job in the White House is a risk most Americans aren't willing to take.

Posted by: thebobbob | October 3, 2008 6:24 PM | Report abuse

"What I'm wondering is, if they're going to 'let Sarah be Sarah', is she going to start undermining Senator McCain?"

Hear, hear. Though it is well-known that I don't think Palin should be allowed within 500 miles of the Oval Office (though come talk to me in 2012), she's 20 times better qualified than McSame. Lots of wing nuts have posted about Palin's "need" to leave the ticket - the GOP might do better to dump McClueless.

Posted by: bondjedi | October 3, 2008 6:17 PM | Report abuse

I disagree with the thrust of CC's argument. This election has moved so strongly in the Democrats' direction during the past week, and is now so close at hand, that every day that passes without a game-breaker by the Republicans is a very bad day for them. The "political markets" at Intrade (real money) and Rasmussen (play money) bear this out. Obama has gained about 1.5 per cent and McCain has lost about the same amount in those markets since it became apparent that congress was going to pass the bailout.

Of course, the Supreme Court could pass a McCain/Palin electoral bailout with five votes, but that's another story....

Posted by: officermancuso | October 3, 2008 6:14 PM | Report abuse

Seriously Chris. You were Palin in trousers.

Defending her as VP material?

You subtract even more from our national cultural, political, and intellectual poverty.

Look to your forbears in Roma.

O tempora, O mores!

Posted by: wpost4112 | October 3, 2008 6:14 PM | Report abuse

Seriously Chris. You were Palin in trousers.

Defending her as VP material?

You subtract even more from our national cultural, political, and intellectual poverty.

Look to your forbears in Roma.

O tempora, O mores!

Posted by: wpost4112 | October 3, 2008 6:14 PM | Report abuse

Chris was just on with Tweety DEFENDING THE INDEFENSIBLE...trying to argue that Palin did well...and he got ROUNDLY SPANKED by Matthews!

It was an embarrassing performance by a barely adequate DC bobble-head!

Shame on you Chris!!

Posted by: wagonjak1 | October 3, 2008 5:59 PM | Report abuse

Um, Chris, there is no way that the election will not be about the economy. The bailout is designed only to stop the hemmorhaging. It does not come close to representing a solution to the problem. We need a lot more structural changes to fix this, and it's not going to happen before 11/4. God forgive me for employing this cliché, but Main Street will still be hurting, badly, come election day. That bodes badly for McCain, even if Sarah Palin did make herself seem (marginally) less idiotic last night. I don't think the American electorate is quite dumb enough to forget Mighty Mouse McCain vowing to fly into Washington and solve the problem and then just arriving and making it worse.

Posted by: ASinMoCo | October 3, 2008 5:50 PM | Report abuse

This election is in fact a referendum on the Economy and the Bush Presidency. The recent financial crisis reinforced the need to change course.

While not sure as to the House seat outlook, Obama is going to win fairly comfortably in the Electoral College and Democrats are going to get very close to 60 seats in the Senate, as they will likely oust at least two of the three Republican Senators in Oregon, North Carolina and Minnesota, in addition to the more definite pickups in Republican open seats and Alaska. Those were races which leaned Republican until the past two weeks. The momentum is clearly on the Democratic side.

Posted by: OHIOCITIZEN | October 3, 2008 5:44 PM | Report abuse

Beyond the economy, I think there are two things that stand out from the debate & today that The Fix might follow-up. During the debate, Gov Palin talked about a difference between her & Senator McCain - about drilling in ANWR. She noted the difference, appropriately. But she went on to say "But I'm trying to convince him that I'm right" or something along those lines. I thought that was a step off the reservation that the base will like, but could alienate swing voters.

The second item is today's story about Michigan. It is being reported that this morning she stated that they should continue to campaign in Michigan - that ceasing to campaign there is a mistake.

What I'm wondering is, if they're going to 'let Sarah be Sarah', is she going to start undermining Senator McCain? We already know she's a bigger draw at rallies, I'm starting to wonder if there's more risk to that strategy than they realize - particularly if her debate performance induces her to start ad libbing to reporters in a way that she thus far has not.

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 3, 2008 5:41 PM | Report abuse

From:
Head of State
http://headofstate.blogspot.com/2008/10/i-may-not-answer-questions-way-you-and.html

Friday, October 03, 2008
I May Not Answer The Questions The Way You And The Moderator Want...

Palin: I may not answer the questions the way you and the moderator want, but I'm going to talk straight to the American people

Ifill: Ok...Gov. Palin. Sen. McCain has said that he will take on the excesses of the financial industries that have led to today's chaos. Yet, Sen. McCain has been for deregulation of those industries throughout his career. How do you resolve that seemingly glaring inconsistency?

Palin: Well, like I said. I'm an outsider, so it's time for straight talk. In Alaska, we like a good cup of Mocha. Good n' strong. And that's how I want out government to be. Good and strong. We won't let terrorist or Al Qaeda march into our towns, into Wasilla--and I know that we're behind that. Why, I just saw a hockey mom walkin' with Joe Sixpack on Main Street in Wasilla.

And so I think that's the way that we can best support our people.

Biden: With all due respect, the Governor has not answered the question. The facts are that in virtually every legislative instance where Sen. McCain has had the opportunity to place reasonable regulations on financial industry before this crisis occurred, he has not done so. It is only with the advent of his campaign that he has begun making these statements. Sen. Obama and I have called for such regulation long before.

Ifill: Gov. Palin?

Palin: There you go, Joe, usin' those facts and those figures that Washington insiders use. Regular, everyday Americans don't want those fancy facts and figures. They want to know that they're getting straight talk--even if it doesn't answer the question at all.

Ifill: Our next question is on Iraq and Afghanistan. The war in Afghanistan has now gone on for over 8 years. We have seen a return of violence to multiple areas in Afghanistan, where the origins of the conflict began, while most funding has been devoted to Iraq, where there was no direct link to the origins of the fight against terrorist group. Sen. Palin, specifically, how would you modify current policy to ensure that proper military effort and funding are being devoted to Afghanistan, and what specific plans would you propose for phasing out action in Iraq and in creating strategic and tactical military progress in Afghanistan?

Palin: Well, Gwen, like I said, I'm an outsider, and outsiders, like mavericks, make their own rules, and that includes how they answer questions. So I'd like to give a shout out to the third grade class in the APO in Kabul. Hey kids! Now, I'm sure that those kids, just like all decent Americans, believe that General Petreaus is doing a heroic job, and we know that he will keep the terrorist on the run in main theatre of the war, Iraq, without showing the white flag of surrender, until we win. Hi, Kids. And with general Petreaus in place, we have the surge...and the surge is working in Iraq, and so the surge would work in Afghanistan, where General Petreus's brave principles would also win them their freedom if we don't surrender. After all, it's like we say in Wasilla, it's energy independence, the phrase is "Drill, Baby, Drill." I respect you, Sen. Biden, for doing things wrong. And that's why John McCain will stand in the face of terror for our freedoms.

Ifill: Senator Biden?

Biden: The general who is the commander of forces in Afghanistan has said--today--that the surge strategy will notwork in Afghanistan. I want you to listen to that again. The commander in Afghanistan--not Joe Biden--has said that the surge will not work in Afghanistan. You just have to listen to the person who is actually in charge of that specific area. That's a fact.

Palin: General McClellan did not say that. He did not say that a strategy of hold and secure would not work in Afghanistan. General McClellan is the Joe Sixpack of Afghanistan--every hockey mom knows that. How long have I been at this, five weeks? Me and McCain and Joe Sixpack and hockey moms--we share that worldview.

Voice of Truth, at a frequency only able to be heard by dogs: His name is McKiernan. McKiernan. McClellan was a general in the Civil War. McKiernan.

Biden: The general...(gracefully) did say that. And, I do have to say, Gwen, I did not hear a plan. Sen. Obama and I, if we have the privilege of taking office, will remove troops from Iraq within 18 months, will ensure that Iraq troops can become responsible for their own security, and will devote those extraordinary funds to the security and financial needs of Americans where it is most necessary---in Afghanistan, and here at home.

Ifill: Alright, now we move onto the question of your own qualifications. Gov. Palin, you have been criticized recently for being unprepared for the Vice Presidency, or the possibility of the Presidency. Sen. Biden, you have been critiqued for being undisciplined. Can you name your Achilles Heel, as it were? Sen. Biden, first:

Biden: Well, I'm sure that lack of discipline is only one of my flaws. But I know that we will work as hard as we can for this country.

Ifill: Gov. Palin?

Palin: No. But that's such a short answer, so I'll say this. Gwen, I have the experience for doin' this job, the executive experience, and I think we need that kind of experience, of what folks are wantin' on Main Street in Wasilla, and what hockey moms are wantin' too! And I know that John McCain will also bring the experiences necessary to this great nation, to preserve our great freedoms. Sen. Biden isn't a hockey mom. He didn't grow up on Main Street in Wasilla. Joe Sixpack did. I may not have an Achilles heel, or know what one is. And that's exactly what America needs. And that's why Americans will be proud and free.

Cite:
Head of State
http://headofstate.blogspot.com/2008/10/i-may-not-answer-questions-way-you-and.html

Posted by: robthewsoncamb | October 3, 2008 5:29 PM | Report abuse

wharwood writes
"If McCain doesn't explain how his policies will create increased median income and wealth, and exactly how they are different from Bush, he's toast."

Exactly. The fundamental problem faced by McCain-Palin is they're arguing that tax cuts boost the economy; President Bush has been arguing for 8 years that tax cuts boost the economy, yet look where we are.

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 3, 2008 5:15 PM | Report abuse

My business partner was at the bank yesterday talking to the person who helps us there. She was talking about how so many small businesses are going under right now due to gaps in credit and accounts receivable. (She also mentioned that the $100,000 line of credit we got three months ago would be impossible to get right now.)

I doubt that the economy will turn around in a month, in fact the turmoil already in motion will play itself out between now and then...all systems have "inertia"...

Go look it up Gov. Palin...

How could the election not be a referendum on the economy (and the wars are really a part of that too)?

Posted by: jwallace1 | October 3, 2008 5:08 PM | Report abuse

They bailout is not going to put the 189K people who lost their jobs last quarter back to work. Its not going to put people back in their houses.

People judge the economy, and vote on it, by their wallets, not by watching what the credit market is doing.

If McCain doesn't explain how his policies will create increased median income and wealth, and exactly how they are different from Bush, he's toast. The normal republican sophistry that cutting taxes on the super rich will lead to growth is not going to fly any more. Its going to stall and crash on approach, so to speak.

What he is going to do Tuesday is claim that by "suspending" his campaign, he helped put through a bill. Obama just needs to read off McCain's intinerary between his suspension and his arrival in DC 24 hours later to prove what a cynical fraud McCain is.

Posted by: wharwood | October 3, 2008 5:07 PM | Report abuse

With today's news about more dreadful declines in employment, the economy will continue to dominate the concerns of voters in the next thirty days.

McCain does not have a coherent plan for addressing the country's financial and economic problems. Palin underscored this in last night's debate in which she was utterly unable to articulate a single McCain economic proposal that differs from the disasterous Bush philosophy of deregulate and cut taxes for the rich.

The generally low ratings given Palin's performance reflect the public's more sophisticated approach to these serious issues. Winking at economic distress is not an acceptable answer from either Palin or McCain.

By pulling out of Michigan the weakening McCain campaign signals that it knows it has a fight on its hands to even hold onto traditionally Republican strongholds in Ohio, PA, Missouri, and North Carolina.

Obama, supported by the excellent performance of Joe Biden in the debate, simply has shown over the past month that the calm, sympathetic, experienced and wise approach to solving our economic crisis is what voters long for.

The people are smarter than Palin and McCain combined.

Posted by: dee5 | October 3, 2008 4:50 PM | Report abuse

BAILOUTS ARE A BAND-AID ON A WAR WOUND.

WHERE'S THE "BOTTOM UP" IN THIS PLUNDERING?

NOW CONGRESS MUST CONDUCT AN INQUIRY.


Now that the "tribute" has been paid, will Congress hold hearings to find out how this REALLY happened?

Was this "crisis" engineered? Was it an outgrowth of purposeful acts and under-the-radar policies?

How can Congress think it's come up with a solution when it's never inquired as to the real CAUSE?

Could it be that lenders were ORDERED by government agencies to offer EASY CREDIT to "targeted" citizens?

And is there now a "disinformation campaign" underway to blame naive Democrats for what may have been a prime example of hard-right social engineering?

Could "extra-judicial targeting" of social or political "undesirables" be a root cause of the mortgage meltdown which led to the wider crisis?

See: http://www.nowpublic.com/world/targeting-u-s-citizens-govt-agencies-root-cause-wall-street-financial-crisis
OR: members.nowpublic.com/scrivener

Posted by: scrivener50 | October 3, 2008 4:49 PM | Report abuse

The 'bailout' cannot impact the economy or voters minds fast enough to impact the election on Nov 4.

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 3, 2008 4:48 PM | Report abuse

Give FeedBack on how you think Sarah Palin did in the Debate, See what the national poll says about what others think,
http://www.mccanes.com/watchdebatevp.html

Posted by: pastor123 | October 3, 2008 4:47 PM | Report abuse

'Sarah Palin, during last night's debate, trotted out the "forward not the past" line several times during last night's vice presidential debate -- a strategy born of necessity given the damaged Republican brand...'

Yes, forget the last eight years and vote Republican.

Amnesiacs for McCain!

Posted by: Bud0 | October 3, 2008 4:44 PM | Report abuse

What is the delay with the McCain camp taking credit for the bailout?

Posted by: bondjedi | October 3, 2008 4:41 PM | Report abuse

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