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Clinton Cash Machine Keeps on Churning

Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (N.Y.) collected $24 million for her primary campaign over the last three months of 2007 and ended the year with "tens of millions" of dollars in the bank, according to campaign chairman Terry McAuliffe.

A jubilant McAuliffe crowed during a conference call with donors -- and reporters, noting that Clinton's total eclipsed the haul of Sen. Barack Obama (Ill.) in the fourth quarter, the second straight period where Clinton bested Obama in the money chase. (Obama collected $22.5 million in primary cash, according to a report earlier today)

"We are going to beat Senator Obama's campaign in fundraising in January," said McAuliffe, who will be henceforth referred to in this space as The Macker. He added: "The phone lines are jammed. That victory last night was something spectacular."

The Clinton campaign brought in more than $1 million since midnight via the Web, and McAuliffe said an e-mail had just been sent out soliciting more. All told so far in 2008, the Clinton campaign has collected $3 million -- still $5 million less than Obama has brought in since the new year began.

What Clinton's numbers mean is that talk of a cash shortage appears to have been somewhat premature. It now seems unlikely that either Clinton or Obama will have any problem fully funding operations ahead of the Feb. 5 primaries. McAuliffe, for his part, predicted the campaign would end one way or another on that day when voters in 20 states -- including electoral behemoths like California, Illinois, New York and Georgia -- are set to cast ballots.

By Chris Cillizza  |  January 9, 2008; 5:11 PM ET
Categories:  Eye on 2008  
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Next: Kerry's Endorsement of Obama: Assessing the Impact

Comments

if edwards bails out and endorses obarma as well, hillary will win for sure, as 2 previous candidates and new guy are against one woman, it is really hard to even hear about it.

Posted by: anakin1992 | January 12, 2008 3:13 AM | Report abuse

And just how much of this Clinton cash comes from lobbyists? Curious minds want to know.

Posted by: optimyst | January 10, 2008 4:07 PM | Report abuse

I am disgusted that Kerry has thrown his support to Obama after all the hard work lots and lots of women put into his ill fated campaign. I personally spent many days running his campaign headquarters in my town and making phone calls on his behalf.
How soon they forget.
I, as a woman, am fed up with men who take our work and give nothing in return.
I am sick of women being excluded from the top positions in the country -- in business and government.
It is time for Hillary to be elected.

Posted by: bghgh | January 10, 2008 2:53 PM | Report abuse

apologies for multiple post - i kept getting error messages.

Posted by: jbentley4 | January 10, 2008 2:05 PM | Report abuse

Terry McAuliffe is an arrogant piece of crap who is willing to go into gutter and worse if that's what it takes to win. He represents everything that's wrong with the Clinton machine and his incompetence as party chairman is one reason why we are stuck with W's second term. Frankly, I don't care if she outraises Barack Obama; his financial support is far more broad-based and less reliant on corporate types. Clinton has the benefit of Bill's rolodex and his political machine. Frankly, the fact that the fundraising race is even close is a credit to Barack Obama, not Hillary Clinton.

I would also say that as a former President and the party's most prominent elder statesman, it is especially unbecoming of Bill Clinton to attack Barack Obama, to misrepresent his record to call him things like "kid" (Barack Obama is the same age as Bill when became President). If he wants to champion Hillary's agenda and her record, that's fine, but to savage one of the Democratic Party's brightest and most talented young stars is unacceptable.

Posted by: jbentley4 | January 10, 2008 2:04 PM | Report abuse

Terry McAuliffe is an arrogant piece of crap who is willing to go into gutter and worse if that's what it takes to win. He represents everything that's wrong with the Clinton machine and his incompetence as party chairman is one reason why we are stuck with W's second term. Frankly, I don't care if she outraises Barack Obama; his financial support is far more broad-based and less reliant on corporate types. Clinton has the benefit of Bill's rolodex and his political machine. Frankly, the fact that the fundraising race is even close is a credit to Barack Obama, not Hillary Clinton.

I would also say that as a former President and the party's most prominent elder statesman, it is especially unbecoming of Bill Clinton to attack Barack Obama, to misrepresent his record to call him things like "kid" (Barack Obama is the same age as Bill when became President). If he wants to champion Hillary's agenda and her record, that's fine, but to savage one of the Democratic Party's brightest and most talented young stars is unacceptable.

Posted by: jbentley4 | January 10, 2008 2:03 PM | Report abuse

Terry McAuliffe is an arrogant piece of crap who is willing to go into gutter and worse if that's what it takes to win. He represents everything that's wrong with the Clinton machine and his incompetence as party chairman is one reason why we are stuck with W's second term. Frankly, I don't care if she outraises Barack Obama; his financial support is far more broad-based and less reliant on corporate types. Clinton has the benefit of Bill's rolodex and his political machine. Frankly, the fact that the fundraising race is even close is a credit to Barack Obama, not Hillary Clinton.

I would also say that as a former President and the party's most prominent elder statesman, it is especially unbecoming of Bill Clinton to attack Barack Obama, to misrepresent his record to call him things like "kid" (Barack Obama is the same age as Bill when became President). If he wants to champion Hillary's agenda and her record, that's fine, but to savage one of the Democratic Party's brightest and most talented young stars is unacceptable.

Posted by: jbentley4 | January 10, 2008 2:01 PM | Report abuse

If Clinton's cash machine keeps churing, that's what I really don't like about her.
She doesn't seem to be truthful with the American people and she reminds me too much of the idiotic Republicans that kiss up to bush.

Posted by: Lodi_1 | January 10, 2008 11:31 AM | Report abuse

Forget the money and the tears - when will you begin critical discussion of Sen. Clinton's WORDS?

"Dr. King's dream began to be realized when President Johnson passed the Civil Rights Act." Imagine if a GOP candidate said the same thing - you'd be all over it!

What did she say immediately after welling up? That she's terrified of the country going backward if she's not elected. Remember - the woman who posed the question that evoked the tears voted Obama. Why? Though moved by Clinton's response, she was taken aback by how quickly Clinton bounced back into political posturing.

Posted by: GordonsGirl | January 10, 2008 11:31 AM | Report abuse

Well said wpos. that is why hillary and her supporters AND LEAST NOW, must show obama and edwards supporters respect. The dem establishment has called us "crazies" or "fringe" for all this time. Now they want that vote. Not going to happen.

People are destroyig voting records. Why? to elect hillary clinton? I don't think so. hillary and the dem leadership MUSt realize that thei are conseqences to their choices, like with bush. If they would attack or throw away the future, they make there bed for the long term. This is why I call the clintons moderate republicans now.

I agree that clinton needs us, we don't need her or her supporters. She'd be well served to but her support behind the democratic candidate for president like kerry did today.

Posted by: JKrishnamurti | January 10, 2008 11:19 AM | Report abuse

Indeed. A realistic democrat.

Obama supporters can live without Hilary supporters because Obama has the future...4, 8, 12 years.

But Hilary cannot survive this general election without Obama supporters.

So, continue to bash Barak and his supporters to your detriment. History marches on.

Posted by: wpost4112 | January 10, 2008 12:02 AM | Report abuse

wpost: Your own typewritten words identify you as what you are.

Posted by: lylepink | January 9, 2008 11:56 PM | Report abuse

I am not a Hilary Hater. I am a life long democrat who hates what the Clintons and Bushes have done to this country as a result of their narcissistic and deceitful ways.

And there are more of us then there are Hilary (aka Bill)-lovers. And our numbers are increasing as they bring their dirty tricks to bear on Barak, the only democrat who has electrified the next generation of democrats (and republican and independents).

If Hilary could put aside the dirty tactics of Bill and his co-horts, I might be persuaded. But she can't or won't.

So it doesn't matter to me if she won 3% more votes in a 3 way primary race.

I do not want to live through the gridlock and chaos that they will bring to the White House and Washington. Her win will also rally the Republicans, who truly loathe them. Just as a win by Huckabee would rally us dems.
'
I'd rather vote and actually work for a Republican like McCain, who hasn't drunk the neocon kool-aid and who has a record of true service to the country. Then Obama will return to take his place. I can wait. By then the Clinton kool=aid drinkers will be mostly gone. And myself included I imagine.

The Clintons have seriously misread the climate. We are tired of the BS. And all the boomer women in the world won't get her elected to the white house when they've lost half the party by attacking the real hope of the democratic party, even if his time is still a few years off.

SC and Nevada will show the truth of this.

Hilary won NH, but at a very very great cost. History will not be kind to them. But they will have no one to blame but their own narcissistic selves.

Posted by: wpost4112 | January 9, 2008 11:40 PM | Report abuse

Funny, not many of you "Hillary Haters" will not even acknowledge Hillary got the MOST VOTES in NH, A FACT somehow you folks don't seem to KNOW that MEANS A WIN.

Posted by: lylepink | January 9, 2008 10:58 PM | Report abuse

dave asks about Sen Obama being asked by the State Dept to help try to quell the violence in Kenya
"Why exactly is this so special?"

You're right, its not necessarily an extraordinary event. But its certainly worth noting.

Posted by: bsimon | January 9, 2008 10:58 PM | Report abuse

The idea that I could be witnessesing the election of the FIRST Female President of the United States brings tears of joy to my eyes. I am a 25 year old woman, have earned 2 BA's & a JD, and I'm a strong supporter of HRC!!
The polls that only well educated, or younger voters are Obama supporters, or only women over 40 support HRC are wrong. Thank you to the voters of New Hampshire that showed the rest of the country that we ALL matter. Well, except those like me in Michigan. For those candidates that took their names off our ballot, that shows me you do NOT care about Michigan and the citizens here. What a shame, the Democratic party screwed their nominee and Michigan will vote republican in the Fall.

Posted by: neecee | January 9, 2008 10:55 PM | Report abuse

dave, That is a generous, but possibly accurate, take on HRC.

I may have heard her incorrectly. I think she said that she was not cleared for all she learned, '93 - '00. I assume that is probably true.

However, it is bragging about a crime to trumpet it. When I heard that, I thought it was a "felony-stupid" statement.

But perhaps I heard her incorrectly.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | January 9, 2008 10:33 PM | Report abuse

Nevadaandy - "...but it does seem noteworthy that, in the midst of the most amazing week of his life, Barack Obama has found the time to do a some diplomatic scut-work"

Correct me if I am wrong but he is still a Senator, correct? The taxpayers are still paying him a salary to fulfill the obligations of a Senator? Would any of the other 99 Senators have turned Secretary Rice down? Why exactly is this so special?

Posted by: dave | January 9, 2008 9:46 PM | Report abuse

'They were and continue to be the ultimate power couple whose relationship has been describe more as a business partnership than marriage (although I don't doubt that they love each other). They have always, since day one, had the common interest in politics and policy and have worked as a team. To think that this ended during the WhiteHouse years seems a stretch.'

well, i have to agree with you there, dave. i do think they love each other. i have to admit, you are being kinder than most on this. everyone is so quick to judge their relationship, as if they had any idea.

Posted by: drindl | January 9, 2008 9:46 PM | Report abuse

bokonon13,
Then we will have to agree to disagree. Probably not surprisingly, I think HRC's Iraq vote was (and still is) the right one. Despite the, um, distance they had for a while, there is no substitute for your spouse to talk about things with. The doghouse notwithstanding, Hillary is and was a lot closer to Bill than Richardson (or anyone) could claim to be. They were and continue to be the ultimate power couple whose relationship has been describe more as a business partnership than marriage (although I don't doubt that they love each other). They have always, since day one, had the common interest in politics and policy and have worked as a team. To think that this ended during the WhiteHouse years seems a stretch.

Posted by: dave | January 9, 2008 9:38 PM | Report abuse

There is something that no one's talked about. With all that he had on his plate with NH, Obama found time to make calls to Kenyan leaders urging them to resolve their problems. The following is something I got off of the Obama website.

One of the more extraordinary stories of the Obama campaign has been playing out behind the scenes over the past week as the candidate has been working on a daily basis to try to calm things down in his father's homeland and his grandmother's home, Kenya, where a contested election has led to riots.

On January 1, two days before the Iowa caucuses, Obama left a message for Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. According to Robert Gibbs, Obama's Communications Director, Rice called back "as we were driving from Sioux City to Council Bluffs on January 1. They talked about the situation and Rice asked Obama to tape a Voice of America message calling for calm." Obama taped the message on January 2, after a rally in Davenport, Iowa. He said, in part:


"Despite irregularities in the vote tabulation, now is not the time to throw that strong democracy away. Now is a time for President Kibaki, opposition leader Odinga, and all of Kenya's leaders to call for calm, to come together, and to start a political process to address peacefully the controversies that divide them. Now is the time for this terrible violence to end.
Kenya's long democratic journey has at times been difficult. But at critical moments, Kenyans have chosen unity and progress over division and disaster. The way forward is not through violence - it is through democracy, and the rule of law. To all of Kenya's people, I ask you to renew Kenya's democratic tradition, and to seek your dreams in peace."
On January 3, the day of the caucuses, he had a conversation with Bishop Desmond Tutu, who had flown to Nairobi to see if he could begin negotiations with the factions. In the days since his Iowa victory, Obama has had near-daily conversations with the U.S. Ambassador in Kenya or with opposition leader Raila Odinga. As of late this afternoon, before his rally in Rochester, N.H., Obama was trying to reach Kenyan President Kibaki.

I haven't been able to talk to Obama directly about this--he is sort of busy right now--but it does seem noteworthy that, in the midst of the most amazing week of his life, Barack Obama has found the time to do a some diplomatic scut-work. I suspect we'll be seeing a lot of this sort of thing if he wins the nomination and is elected President.

It seems to me he's has foreign policy experience. The same message he sends to Americans about choosing unity and progress over division and disaster is the same message he sent to Kenyans. At least he's consistent. Unlike other politicians who tell foreign countries how they should be treating their people while not doing the same for their own countrymen.

If we want change then change begins with each voter. Voters have to change the way they consider the qualifications of the candidates. Don't put so much emphasis on a person's experience, instead look at the consistency in their views and actions and the quality of the decisions they make.


Posted by: Nevadaandy | January 9, 2008 9:38 PM | Report abuse

dave, and with all that Hillary learned at Bill's side, she still voted for the Iraq invasion without doing her homework first. Also, keep in mind that for the last 2 years of Bill's 2nd term, he + Hillary were barely speaking to each other. Finally, while she at least some of the time might have heard pillow talk about issues he was dealing with, she was not as I understand it part of the policy 'inner circle,' at least not after the public reaction to her healthcare proposals early on. Bill Richardson would have a more legitimate claim on the doings of the Clinton Admin. - and notice that he is not making one. Her "experience" in the Oval Office does not seem to be something she can legitimately say would prepare her more for the presidency. Also, the issues then and the issues now are in no way the same.

Posted by: bokonon13 | January 9, 2008 8:39 PM | Report abuse

' Donna Brazile, a CNN commentator and former Gore campaign manager,
was disturbed by the "tone" and comments Bill Clinton has previously made about Obama's inexperience and lack of media scrutiny of his background , political record and policy positions.

And finally, Jesse Jackson Jr., an Obama campaign co chair was on MSNBC today discussing the Hillary tears story and implied that her tears/emotional
vulnerability were personally directed at her own political fate and appearance and questioned if she had cried about Katrina.

Has anyone else here seen or heard these or other kinds of racially tinged elements discussed in the race?

If either or both camps go down this road it would be very damaging to the candidates, the Democratic party and the country.'

I have to agree.. this is getting ugly for both obama and hillary..

Posted by: drindl | January 9, 2008 8:34 PM | Report abuse

JKrishnamurti,
Edwards speech last night did not lead me to believe he was anywhere close to dropping out. I have to say I'm of mixed feelings. On one hand, him staying in only helps Republicans by making the Dem primary fight last longer. On the other hand, I got tired of his fingernails on the blackboard rantings during the LAST election cycle so I am ready to see him leave the race. And politics.

Posted by: dave | January 9, 2008 7:52 PM | Report abuse

sorry for the duplicate posting

Posted by: rdklingus | January 9, 2008 7:41 PM | Report abuse

"AP: Richardson to drop out of 2008 race"

Come on edwards. Do the patriotic thing, brother. If you say you stand for what you stand for, get out of the race. Please.

I'll do anything, short of selling my soul, to get Edwards out of the race. for obama's sake. Your hear that edwards? What must we do to get you to drop out. We love you, but we need you to drop out.

Posted by: JKrishnamurti | January 9, 2008 7:40 PM | Report abuse

And a lot of that cash comes from the Wall Street crowd. Chris, has it really passed your attention that Wall Street went down down down when it looked like Obama, a genuine outsider, was winning. Once Clinton, THEIR CANDIDATE, won, it shot back up again. The Wall Street swine created the Clinton's and understand that Hillary will allow them to continue ripping off ordinary working men and women.

Posted by: mibrooks27 | January 9, 2008 7:40 PM | Report abuse

I was perhaps naive to think that it wouldn't be a factor in the Democratic primaries, but race is being discussed as an underlying issue in the NH results. Chris Matthews ( I know, I know..) had pollsters and a panel that considered whether variances inpolling vs. actual results were due to the "Bradley effect".( As you may know, this describes whites telling pollsters they plan to vote for a black candidate but they actually don'). Donna Brazile, a CNN commentator and former Gore campaign manager,
was disturbed by the "tone" and comments Bill Clinton has previously made about Obama's inexperience and lack of media scrutiny of his background , political record and policy positions.

And finally, Jesse Jackson Jr., an Obama campaign co chair was on MSNBC today discussing the Hillary tears story and implied that her tears/emotional
vulnerability were personally directed at her own political fate and appearance and questioned if she had cried about Katrina.

Has anyone else here seen or heard these or other kinds of racially tinged elements discussed in the race?

If either or both camps go down this road it would be very damaging to the candidates, the Democratic party and the country.

Posted by: rdklingus | January 9, 2008 7:37 PM | Report abuse

bokonon13 - "She has exactly one and one-half terms in the Senate under her belt, and that is ALL the relevant experience she can claim."

Let me start by saying I am not a fan of the Clinton's. That said, I still maintain that since POTUS is a unique job, unknown really to anybody but presidents and really really close people/advisors, that her time spent next to Bill definitely gives her an experience advantage over any other candidate. I would argue that knowing how things work, what works, what doesn't, how to run things effectively, who you want to listen to and who you don't want to listen to and how to use the power of the position most effectively are all very important. Being close to Bill and experiencing these things, being able to talk about why he did or didn't do certain things, his decisions and seeing the way he worked is experience that is unmatchable despite not having "done" anything. You might recall that it took Bill a year or two to become good at being president. Prior to that, it was a series of mistakes with the media line of "Is the president relevant anymore". Now you may not like the policies or the activities of the Clinton's the last six years of his presidency, but it's hard to argue that he was not effective. Think of is this way. There are probably many people in a business that are qualified to be the CEO. If none of them had been a CEO before but you had been mentored by the CEO, wouldn't that be an invaluable and desired experience?

Posted by: dave | January 9, 2008 7:24 PM | Report abuse

"Thanks for this column. The IMPORTANT fact to me that you presented that no one else has been reporting is that in the last 24 hours Clinton has doubled the amount that Obama has managed to raise in that same period. The Obama staff has been crowing all day long that they raised $500,000"

SORRY CHARLIE. rEESERACH YOUR PROPOGANDA AGAIN. Obama raised that in ONe day. He has raised a million a day this year. for you laymens out there, that is 8 million dollars in 8 days. Try again to propogate again charlie. Research first though

"FROM: David Plouffe, Obama Campaign Manager
DATE: January 9, 2008
RE: The Next Four Weeks

Coming off an impressive win in Iowa and taking the once inevitable frontrunner down to the wire in her firewall state, it is clear that Obama is well-positioned to become the next President of the United States. As the people of Iowa and New Hampshire demonstrated, the American people desperately want change they can believe in. Barack Obama is the candidate to deliver that change by bringing people together, standing up to the special interests, and telling people what they need to know.

Our campaign now turns its focus squarely to Nevada and South Carolina, and February 5th. Today, we kick off the next phase of our campaign in New Jersey, an important February 5th state.

Fundraising

In the 4th Quarter of 2007, our campaign raised $23.5 million - over $22.5 million of which is for the primary election. In that quarter, we added 111,000 new donors for a total of 475,000 donors in 2007.

In the first 8 days of 2008, we raised over $8 million and gained 35,000 new donors. Since midnight last night, we have raised another $500,000 online. We continue to build a grassroots movement that makes us best-positioned to compete financially in the primaries and caucuses coming up.
"

that's ok. Lie spin and discredit is all the gop has left (clinton included). i don't hold it agaisnt you. Teh gop has nothing else. But that doesn't mean you should be called a lair, or ignorant of the facts. That is called reality

Posted by: JKrishnamurti | January 9, 2008 7:24 PM | Report abuse

I was perhaps naive to think that it wouldn't be a factor in the Democratic primaries, but race is being discussed as an underlying issue in the NH results. Chris Matthews ( I know, I know..) had pollsters and a panel that considered whether polling vs. actual results due to the "Bradley effect".( As you may know, this describes whites telling pollsters they plan to vote for a black candidate but they actually don'). Donna Brazile,
was disturbed by the "tone" and comments Bill Clinton has previously made about Obama's inexperience and lack of scrutiny of his background , political record and policy positions.

A

Posted by: rdklingus | January 9, 2008 7:23 PM | Report abuse

Thanks for this column. The IMPORTANT fact to me that you presented that no one else has been reporting is that in the last 24 hours Clinton has doubled the amount that Obama has managed to raise in that same period. The Obama staff has been crowing all day long that they raised $500,000 And this achievement was done without sending out a fundraising email to her supporters --an oversight that I sent an email to the campaign and complained about. Now it is clear that this campaign is going to have to be fought in the trenches for the next nine months and Terry is going to have to learn to quickly raise money from the MILLIONS of Clinton by doing things like selling a few million bumper stickers. That should give him a huge email mailing list to work over and over again. The Clinton campaign is not going to quickly defeat the Obama or Edwards campaign and is going to have to raise another $100,000,000.00 in the next few months. That isn't going to come from large donors. Every fundraising trick that Obama does Clinton is going to have to do it better and faster, and she had better start soon!

Posted by: charliegallie | January 9, 2008 7:16 PM | Report abuse

The gop is playing the games by pakistan rules. Someone tell this politican (Petraeus) to take his uniform off, like bush did musheriff, if he is going to given the presidency without getting eleceted by the american people.

Posted by: JKrishnamurti | January 9, 2008 7:09 PM | Report abuse

Mccain wants to elect a new commander in cheif. First the war czar, now this. It's called abjudicating your responsiblities.

"McCain: "There is only one man who should decide when to withdraw from Iraq and that is David Petraeus""

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Posted by: JKrishnamurti | January 9, 2008 7:07 PM | Report abuse

Cry baby Hillary can raise all the money in the world she wants, come super tuesday and we will see all that money as been for not. I guess there will be more cying for Mrs. Clinton after super tuesday.

Posted by: lumi21us | January 9, 2008 7:07 PM | Report abuse

"The country needs a doer not a talker."

Great. The Clinton ad people come up with a new slogan, and we have to hear it from each supporter, no matter the context.

Suppose an undecided voter were to ask what Clinton's "doing" consisted of in the years 1970-1992?

Suppose an undecided voter were to ask what Clinton's "doing" consisted of in the White House, other than delaying universal coverage for - so far - 15 years?

Suppose an undecided voter were to ask what Clinton's "doing" consisted of in the years 2001-2007, other than giving Bush the green light to invade Iraq without reading the NIE?

I have no doubt that her heart is - mostly - in the right place, although her air of entitlement is a big turn-off for me, as is the veiled racism of Bill's comments earlier this week.

But I have had quite enough of hearing her claim "35 years of experience." She has exactly one and one-half terms in the Senate under her belt, and that is ALL the relevant experience she can claim.

And what did she do in the Senate? I refer you to my 3rd question, above.

Posted by: bokonon13 | January 9, 2008 6:50 PM | Report abuse

I think when it's all said and done. New hampshire voters are going down as the butt of jokes forever. This will be remembered as teh "crying game". :)

I think it will backfire when other states say, "I don't care if she cried".

From what I've seen there has been zero sexism in this race towards here, as much as her and her supporters have tried to spin it that way.

The same cannot be said of the gop's (clinton included), exploitation of white racism in america. i pray it backfires.

Posted by: JKrishnamurti | January 9, 2008 6:39 PM | Report abuse

Wasn't campaign funding supposed to be the key advantage of the Clinton campaign one year ago?

Posted by: charlesf | January 9, 2008 6:38 PM | Report abuse

"No - that was likely "sisterhood anger." Proof of the media bias towards Obama that has indeed permeated the campaign these past months.
"

Wahtever you say. It's the media's fault. Not he fact that we are knee deep in a presidential election. The media was in clintons pocket for the entire election up until the people of iowa spoke.

What a waste of time this site is with all the propogandists, spinning. i'm glad the american people are wise to these propoganidsts now. "knowing is half the battle". As the gi joes say.

you can't fool all the people all the time. Keep crying clinton supporters. When more americans see the reaction to her crying her way to vitory she will be swept.

Again, I don't care about her crying. I don't think she's frigid. I don't care about her personal mannerisms or habits. What I do care about is her husband connected tot he hip of bush 41. i do care about her war stances. I do care about her going and taking money from fox .I do care about her using fox tactics again obama.

I don't care about her crying. i do care that it sways voters. This is just a clinton push. it only works if the american people don't know. This is the internet age. We are not as dumb as our fathers and grandfatehrs, The future is now. We have the internet now

Posted by: JKrishnamurti | January 9, 2008 6:24 PM | Report abuse

If the democrats win, does that mean the american justice system is back up and operational? If so what does that say about the gop?

Factor in that terrorism helps them. What has teh gop become, if not a party of terrorist fascists?

"Federal judge won't inquire into CIA tapes case
Justice Department, CIA, and Congress continue investigations


updated 14 minutes ago
WASHINGTON - A federal judge refused on Wednesday to delve into the destruction of CIA interrogation videos, saying there was no evidence the Bush administration violated a court order and the Justice Department deserved time to conduct its own investigation.

The decision by U.S. District Judge Henry H. Kennedy was a victory for the Bush administration, which had urged the courts not to wade into a politically-charged issue already being investigated by the Justice Department, CIA and Congress.

The CIA has acknowledged that in 2005 it destroyed videos of officers using tough interrogation methods while questioning two al-Qaida suspects.

"

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Posted by: JKrishnamurti | January 9, 2008 6:19 PM | Report abuse

femalenick -- I don't disagree with you that the media's response was sexist. And I say that as someone who doesn't much like Hillary. But I think you overstate your case when you say that more generally Obama has gotten a free pass whereas Hillary has been treated unfairly. From the summer through November, all of the media coverage on Hillary trumpeted her as an inevitable and unstoppable force. That's hardly negative coverage. At the same time, Obabma was being taken to task for his "uninspiring" campaign, and his "failure to live up to the hype."

Personally, I think the only thing that changed -- and which is likely changing again -- is that the media needed a new story. Sure, Chris Matthews is an a$$ and the MSM has some prejudice. But their primary bias, in my view, is towards laziness and senationalism. Not towards any particular candidate.

Posted by: _Colin | January 9, 2008 6:15 PM | Report abuse

Femalenick, you are right to be pissed off about the way she has been treated by the media. It has been reprehensible. Maybe the best part of watching her take the oath of office would be seeing Chris Matthew's head explode.

I agree with you that Democratic women over the age of 40 have united behind her. There may be enough of you for her to win the nomination.

Here is my concern, if HRC wins she is going to be a gift from God to the Republicans. They will unite in their common hatred for her. Moreover, if McCain is the nominee he will attract a considerable number of independents.

That means HRC and her base of Democratic women over the age of 40 are running against a unified Republican party and independents. I just don't see how that math adds up to an HRC win.

Now, I'll stipulate that HRC has more experience than Obama. I'll even go along with the observation that America may not be ready to elect a black guy named Barack Hussein Obama.

That said, he and only he has a chance to build a coalition of Democrats and Independents that deliver the White House.

She's done some things in her life, and she's put in her time. But punching the clock the longest doesn't mean she should have the job. If experience alone was all it took, we'd be looking at Biden v McCain in November.

Posted by: choskasoft | January 9, 2008 6:12 PM | Report abuse

What I find personally disturbing are the asinine and juvenile comments so many have posted. I expect it from the GOP faithfuls, but when I read those from Obama supporters (on CC's other posts these past 24 hours), I'm especially disgusted. Where is the non-divisive, non-partisan, bring-the-country together spirit? If I were Obama, I'd encourage my supporters to reflect the campaign's spirit.

The Hillary Haters - regardless of political leaning or lack thereof -- have seethed such venom that the HRC supporters have increased their resolve.

One lesson from NH is to never underestimate the power of true anger to mobilize. The more the press skewered Hillary, the more angry the voters became. No one likes double standards, and to anyone paying attention, the media's double standard went into full view on Monday with the repeated showing of Hillary showing emotion. Every person/pundit that questioned whether the tears were real or not probably earned her another vote. Sympathy vote? No - that was likely "sisterhood anger." Proof of the media bias towards Obama that has indeed permeated the campaign these past months.

Only Hillary's every word and move has been scrutinized. She's too cold and calculating, but when she shows emotion, she's too weak. Only her campaign is referred to as a "machine." When she laughs, it's a cackle. When she shows any irritation, she "loses it." Oh - and what other candidate's wrinkles and wardrobe has been discussed ad infinitum?

Will we women play a role in giving Hillary the nomination? Count on it. Any woman over 40 who isn't purely ideological will be angered by double standards -- and absent a perfect candidate on either side,we will flock to the woman. Sisterhood is very real for women over 40.

Posted by: femalenick | January 9, 2008 6:01 PM | Report abuse

Its all about money, isn't it?

Posted by: soonerthought | January 9, 2008 5:49 PM | Report abuse

We can escape these poltiical "Dark Ages". When in the dark you must seek the light. Or live in the darkness usign willful ignorance as armor.

Getout of the cave. Cut your chains. The future is now

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegory_of_the_cave


"Can Hillary Cry Her Way Back to the White House?
MAUREEN DOWD

"

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/09/opinion/08dowd.html?_r=1&ref=opinion&oref=slogin

Rufus

fix yoru site cc. Ever since you banned me this site has been twitchy. Karma? :)

Posted by: JKrishnamurti | January 9, 2008 5:41 PM | Report abuse

Full disclosure, I'm an Obama supporter.

HRC clearly has a strong base of women, particularly over the age of 40. That base was enough for her to win last night. It might be enough for her to win the nomination.

If HRC is the nominee the Republicans will unite behind their nominee like an iron fist. Moreover, they will also pick up a substantial number of independents. On top of that, I wouldn't count on the young Obama supporters to step up for her in the general.

Will someone please explain to me how HRC and her base of Democratic women wins in November against a highly unified Republican base as well as the independents they will attract?

Factor in the fact that an Obama loss means that people under the age of 40 will be completely demoralized, and I just don't see how the numbers add up for HRC to win in November.

Posted by: choskasoft | January 9, 2008 5:40 PM | Report abuse

According to the Clinton campaign's narrative of choice, Sen Clinton is the most sensible choice for president because of her "experience." This "experience" obviously doesn't refer to her single full Senate term--even John Edwards has one of those.

The "experience" that separates Hillary from the pack is her time in the White House, where she purportedly served as some sort of co-president/consigliere to her husband.

On December 26, the NYT published a lengthy article that gave the lie to such claims. In her time as first lady, Hillary Clinton didn't hold a security clearance. She didn't attend National Security Council meetings.

According to the Times's strange formulation, "She did not assert herself on the crises in Somalia, Haiti and Rwanda." Left unanswered is the nagging question of who would have cared if she had "asserted herself."

http://www.weeklystandard.com/Content/Public/Articles/000/000/014/554fwchn.asp

Like many other things related to the Clintons, her experience claim seems to be factually deficient.

Posted by: proudtobeGOP | January 9, 2008 5:37 PM | Report abuse

we know you're trying to fix the election for obama.. but the title of your post is pretty assine. OBama's money machine is rolling too, but you'd never use that as an intro, or talk about his "crowing"

signed, sealed, delivered, you're obamas.

still try to treat the canidates equeally.

or just quit pretending to be a journalist.

Posted by: newagent99 | January 9, 2008 5:34 PM | Report abuse

"I think McCain, for all his faults, would also work "across the aisle." "

I agree. Far more than the current admin & apparently far more than his competitors for the GOP nomination.

Posted by: bsimon | January 9, 2008 5:32 PM | Report abuse

bsimon - from the other thread - I agree with your main point about BHO's philosophy. With Biden out, I've been looking at BHO's web site, and I do like what I see. If he had a bit more experience, or if we'd never gotten into this misadventure in Iraq, this would be a no-brainer for me - because I do believe Obama has the skills to bring the country together. (And b/c then we'd be focusing on domestic issues and his position on health care, which I know something about, is the most reasonable and practical.) However, I think McCain, for all his faults, would also work "across the aisle."

Posted by: -pamela | January 9, 2008 5:26 PM | Report abuse

It was a historic upset! The people from New Hampshire did not get fool by a salesman. The country needs someone who has the strength and experience to make the change. The country needs a doer not a talker.

Fellow Americans, please don't be fooled by a phony salesman.

Posted by: graysce101 | January 9, 2008 5:25 PM | Report abuse

jsu8233n-
I don't think they're official yet. The campaigns with a lot of dough are releasing the numbers early - in an effort to get even more. The campaings officially don't have to file for a couple weeks.

Posted by: bsimon | January 9, 2008 5:21 PM | Report abuse

(4th quarter results)

Posted by: jsu8233n | January 9, 2008 5:16 PM | Report abuse

I may have missed it but do you know where can I find Giulianis, Romneys, McCains, and Huckabees?

Posted by: jsu8233n | January 9, 2008 5:15 PM | Report abuse

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