Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

Parsing the (Tracking) Poll: McCain=Bush?



With President Bush's approval rating as low as it is, it's critical that John McCain be able to show some distance from this administration. (Photo by Charles Dharapak -- Associated Press)

When John McCain became the Republican party's presidential nominee in early spring, the central question of the election was whether he could convince voters -- particularly moderates and independents -- that he represented a break from the policies of President George W. Bush.

McCain had been forced to embrace a decent portion of the Bush agenda -- most notably the president's tax cut proposal -- in order to win the Republican primary nod but once he became the party's nominee the task was simple: break from the current president as often as possible without entirely losing the base in the process.

The most recent Washington Post/ABC News tracking poll shows that while McCain has made inroads into breaking the Bush-McCain ties, he hasn't done enough -- and time is running out. (Don't know what a tracking poll is? Check this out.)

Back in mid-June, McCain had a huge problem on his hands. Asked whether McCain, if elected, would "mainly lead the country in a new direction" or "mainly continue in George W. Bush's direction" just 41 percent agreed with the first statement while 55 percent agreed with the second.

Those numbers remained largely unchanged until the Republican National Convention in early September where Bush was nowhere to be seen -- literally, as Hurricane Gustav made him cancel his plans to be in St. Paul personally -- and McCain's pick of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin sent a strong signal that the Bush dominance of the GOP was over.

Immediately after the convention, a Post/ABC poll showed 46 percent of people believing McCain would take the country in a new direction and 50 percent saying he would take it down the Bush path -- a statistical dead heat and a marked improvement from McCain's standing on the question over the summer.

Since then, however, McCain hasn't been able to move the needle at all. The latest Post/ABC track -- containing data from Oct. 19, 20 and 21 -- showed 46 percent of those polled choosing the "new direction" option and 51 percent choosing the Bush direction option.

Those numbers just aren't good enough for McCain -- especially when considering the stunning unpopularity of the current president. In the last (non-tracking) national poll conducted by the Post/ABC just 23 percent of those surveyed approved of the job Bush was doing while a whopping 73 percent disapproved. Even more eye opening? Of the 23 percent who approved, seven percent did so strongly; of the 73 percent who disapproved 58 percent (not a typo!) did so strongly.

With those kind of numbers, it's not good for McCain's political prospects that voters split roughly down the middle over whether he represents a third Bush term or not.

It's almost certainly too late for McCain to change hearts and minds on the issue. Our advice? He should have started using this line a lot earlier than the third and final debate.

By Chris Cillizza  |  October 23, 2008; 6:00 AM ET
Categories:  Eye on 2008 , Parsing the Polls  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: House Republicans Bow to Political Reality
Next: Wag the Blog: Palin's Shopping Spree

Comments

MCCAIN'S OWN WORDS IN 2000 - HE'S A SOFT SOCIALIST FLIP-FLOPPER

STUDENT: Why is it that someone like my father who goes to school for 13 years gets penalized in a huge tax bracket because he's a doctor. Why is that - why does he have to pay higher taxes than everybody else? Just because he makes more money. How is that fair?

MCCAIN: I think you're questioning, questioning the fundamentals of a progressive tax system where people who make more money pay more in taxes than a flat across the board percentage. I think it's to some degree because we feel obviously that wealthy people can afford more. We have over the years beginning with John F. Kennedy reduced some of those marginal tax rates to make them less onerous. I believe that when you really look at the tax code the very wealthy because they can afford tax lawyers and all kinds of loopholes really don't pay as much as you think they do, when you just look at the percentages. And I think middle income Americans, working Americans, who when you count in payroll taxes, sales taxes, mortgage -- all of the, all of the taxes that working Americans pay -- I think you would also think that they also deserve very significant relief.

At that point host Chris Matthews asked for members of the audience to applaud if they support wealthier people paying a higher percentage of their incomes; there was loud applause.

STUDENT: I still don't see how that's fair...aren't we getting closer and closer to Socialism and stuff...?

MCCAIN: Look, here's what I really believe: That when you are, when you reach a certain level of comfort, there's nothing wrong with paying somewhat more. But at the same time it shouldn't be totally out of proportion.

McCain added that the "first people who deserve a tax cut are working Americans...and they're the ones I would support tax cuts for first."

Posted by: seemstome | October 24, 2008 10:36 PM | Report abuse

Denials, Endorsements, Distancing, Blaming

I am having fun

http://www.ucubd.com/Index.aspx?id=855&cid=3154

Posted by: LAThinker | October 24, 2008 6:57 PM | Report abuse

McCain, "I am not Bush.
I voted for 75% of Bush's agenda, but I am not Bush.
I campaigned in 2000 for Bush but I am not Bush,
I campaigned in 2004 for Bush but I am not Bush,
I voted against Bush tax cuts in 2001, but now I support them, but I am not Bush,
I supported the (unprovoked) war in Iraq and supported Bush all the way, but I am not Bush."

When McCain gets up in the morning he goes to his mirror and says 100 times "I AM NOT BUSH."

The more he says it the more he believes it... but no one else does.

Posted by: kkrimmer | October 24, 2008 5:09 PM | Report abuse

When a business has a critical problem they make an investigation as to its root cause and devise a solution to prevent the critical problem form happening again. How can you tell the dems are the root cause of the Freddie-Fannie mess? They currently control congress and there is NO investigation into the root cause of the problem.

Posted by: leapin | October 24, 2008 12:26 PM | Report abuse

McCain does not equal Bush. everyone is there own person and MCacin has his own ideas and McCain is proven servant and leader in this country and mccain is a reformer. if people vote for obama just because they ahve disliked bush's policies then they are making a grave mistake. obama's socialism which equals raising higher taxes will destroy american business and families. socialism is a proven failure and eurpean countries like france and denmark(where i know someone personally)that have that form of goverment have high unemployment rates and in france there is a tax policy that punish etrepreneurialism. socialism sucks the hope from people. socialism has always gone hand in hand with freedom being attacked, obama has already shown disrespect for our constitution and liberal judges have been atatcked freedon very agressevily. no american should want our nation to become like that. we need to fight that. i pray to God that the american people do not what this anti freedom socialism. think with your hearts and minds when you go vote.

Posted by: diaco7529 | October 24, 2008 10:02 AM | Report abuse

Voters in these key states are going to WAKE UP this week and decide to vote for McCain and Sarah Palin - McCain's key demographics are saying they are undecided however they lean toward McCain.

In sharp contrast Obama is going to see nothing but erosion in his numbers as people realize they were completely out of their minds to even consider voting for him.

President McCain is the correct leader to bring the economy roaring back even better than before.

.


.

Posted by: 37thandOSt | October 24, 2008 7:43 AM | Report abuse

Yes this McCain notion that he"s been tested, and presumedly passed seems to a bit of an imaginary notion on his part.
He was tested at the Naval Academy, and he flunked out until Admiral dady l saved him.
He was tested in and on his way to Vietnam, and crashed 3 planes without imposing any damage on the enemy. It is hard to concieve that spending five years in a prison camp as a passed test, even if it deserves a sort of sympathetic praise.
He failed in his first marriage, dumped his first wife cold in this, perhaps, he past some test bt finding an attactive, rich wife who could support his ambitions.We could call that the Gold digger test.
He has as most senators who have been in the senate 30 plus years had some part in co- sponsing bills that seemed progressive- most of which he no longer adhears to including some that gave him his maverick nickname.
He said he was for womens right to life, and the inequity of the Bush Tax cuts. But is now their biggest supporter.
He ran agaist George Bush in the 200o republican promary and failed that test.
Help me here what specific test did he really past, that "they all know"(the potential enemys I suppose);, he has been given to occassonal and inconsistent bellicose tirades against various enemies, but the inconsitenccy of his possitions don"t seem to reflect a paased test.

Does someone know a test that he actually pass= getting his pilots licence, perhaps.

Posted by: LuxLumina | October 24, 2008 1:50 AM | Report abuse

I WOULD RATHER BE LINKED TO PRES. BUSH THAN BARNEY FRANKS, CHRIS DODD, DEMS., SEN. OBAMA, AND ACORN!!

* These Democrats have caused our current economic problems because they caused banks to make bad loans.

* THESE DEMOCRATS HAVE BEEN TRYING TO MARRY WELFARISM AND CAPITALISM TOGETHER by give unqualified people home loans. AS WE HAVE SEEN, CAPITALISM/WELFARISM DOES NOT WORK. This has messed up our economy. For the next few years, our great self regulating system --free market/capitalism-- is going to shovel out all this garbage the Democrats have pushed into it. However, if we elect Sen. Obama, I am sure we will have more of this WELFARISM/CAPITALISM. Then we could really head into a depression. Only the Lord know what will happen then. May God help us!!!

BTW, there is nothing wrong with helping poor. That is why we have charity organizations, unemployment benefits, social security, etc. But Gov. should not interfere with our free market/capitalism system.

Posted by: lazerboy | October 24, 2008 12:27 AM | Report abuse

CNN, CBS, NY TIMES polls...pure manipulation...
Here is the situation...
How much money they will make if McCain wins?
Not much! Just another old president…
But...if Obama wins!!! Books, videos, movies, etc...Only God knows the amount of money the people in the media industry and Hollywood are gone make with the history!
The first black president in the history of this country!!!
The headlines sounds nice, the problem is that Mr. Obama’s political career is full of scandals, corruption, and in the reality we do not really know him very well…
We are just desperate people here looking for a boat of salvation from the storm in which our country is going thru now…pay attention people…be aware…You are all being manipulated by these guys playing God! Power…That is all what matter to then… And the Nation and its people…who cares? God will provide right?
I CAN DREAM, CAN'T I?

Posted by: JANESCHE | October 23, 2008 10:22 PM | Report abuse

There is a fork in the road ahead - take the wrong prong, and you are firmly on your way to becoming a third world nation.

Take the right path, and you might keep your leadership and restore the respect of the civilized world.

That it happens to be a black man he who could save your country from long-term decline is probably the strangest twist in history.

You have twelve days to decide.

Posted by: DomingoTavella | October 23, 2008 9:56 PM | Report abuse

Toritto wrote:

Last few days I've exchanged several emails with an old army bud in Ohio.

6 months ago he was very annoyed I was for Obama. He came out strongly for McSame after the GOP nomination was clinched.

Lately he has bordered on hysterical (that's the only way I can describe it) as poll numbers shift Obama's way. There is no rational discussion with him.

I suggested we not discuss the campaign since we were not going to change eachother's minds. I wished him good luck working for his candidate and reminded him that (a) whether he believed it or not both sides loved this country and (b) we would all be Americans after this election - just as we are now.

The hysteria was a bit frightening.....like his entire world view was on the verge of collapse.

Sad.

====================================

I learned a long time ago that if the first two sentences back and forth about politics don't go well, you pretend not to hear anything further on the subject, and suddenly remember amazing baseball facts and great recipes.

There are many people I'm happy to have as neighbors, friends, and family members, who would strangle me, or I would strangle them, if we discussed politics.

Posted by: officermancuso | October 23, 2008 8:21 PM | Report abuse

Opa2 said: “McCain says he "has been tested" but I wonder where?”

Opa, I was wondering the same thing. As far as I know, he’s never been in a position to have to suddenly decide how to respond to a national emergency. He’s hasn’t organized a response, hasn’t lead a response team. So, what does he consider the event in which he was tested? (reporters, anybody want to take that one on?

He’s one of 100 Senators and, as far as I know, doesn’t have any more experience than any of the others…probably less than many. Several Senators were long-time Governors; Jim Webb was Sec of the Navy…I’m sure some of them have responded to serious emergencies. John McCain? Not so much.

Posted by: malis | October 23, 2008 3:36 PM | Report abuse

the schlepper zouk says:
"I guess you missed the mason dixon poll in FL that clearly found that 80% of military supports McCain."

-Well, that's why "Military Intelligence" is such a popular oxymoron

Posted by: VMR1 | October 23, 2008 2:35 PM | Report abuse

Last few days I've exchanged several emails with an old army bud in Ohio.

6 months ago he was very annoyed I was for Obama. He came out strongly for McSame after the GOP nomination was clinched.

Lately he has bordered on hysterical (that's the only way I can describe it) as poll numbers shift Obama's way. There is no rational discussion with him.

I suggested we not discuss the campaign since we were not going to change eachother's minds. I wished him good luck working for his candidate and reminded him that (a) whether he believed it or not both sides loved this country and (b) we would all be Americans after this election - just as we are now.

The hysteria was a bit frightening.....like his entire world view was on the verge of collapse.

Sad.

Posted by: toritto | October 23, 2008 2:34 PM | Report abuse

Worth posting again:

I'm an old retired guy who doesn’t have to work and I can honestly say it won't matter to me in the long run who wins this election. At my age any election I participate in could be my last. I do believe however that the current administration has been the worst in my lifetime (born during FDR). I don't think anyone can rationally deny that. We have had 8 years of corruption, unnecessary war and shredding of the Constitution. Over the last month we have watched with our own eyes the slow motion impoverishment of America. Now this same party wants us to give them 4 more years so that John the "maverick" can fix Washington. ...like I was born yesterday.

If "small town working class" rust-belt voters in Ohio, Pa., Michigan and Indiana help re-elect the GOP then I for one don't want to hear anymore whining from them about their disappearing jobs and livelihoods, the high cost of college and gas, lack of health care etc. Let Johnnie' and Sarah’s "patriotism" put food on your table. Go flip burghers!

Screw 'ya. Cling to your guns and religion and “small town values”. Pray to Jesus when you go hunting for a meal. Stay with that church and keep your weapon. You will need both the soup kitchen and the rifle. You will deserve what you get. Your kids can go to community college if you can afford it and you can forget about ever retiring. You’re probably out of work anyway.

I got mine already. I live comfortably in the sunny South on a golf course in a paid off house, got my steady income, my "socialist" medicare and prescription drug coverage that you younger people wish you had but will never get under the Republicans. I sent my girls to college and they are successfully out on their own. The world won't run out of gas before I go and the planet won't get too hot.

A McCain election ain't gonna hurt me.

As Johnny Carson used to say - I upped my lifestyle - up yours!

I’m an old man. Trust me on this. God helps those who help themselves - if you're in deep doodoo economically and you vote Republican for their "values", you deserve it.

Posted by: toritto | October 23, 2008 2:20 PM | Report abuse

McCain says he "has been tested" but I wonder where? He was a junior officer in the navy when he had his plane shot out from under him. His conduct as a POW, by his own admission, let him to apologize to his fellow prisoners. When he came home his "connections" earned him quick promotions and a slot at the white House where he betrayed Jimmy Carter who gave him orders to do one thing and he did another. After he got out, his wife's money bought him a congressional seat and later a senatorial seat. He has never been in a position of leadership in his party so, please tell, where has he been "tested"? He is being tested now and I guess we can all see the results. His must be the most mismanaged campaign in history, Meme, Mene,Tekel, Upharsin. (Counted, counted, weighted and found too light)

Posted by: Opa2 | October 23, 2008 1:46 PM | Report abuse

Chris, we have seen nothing to convince us that McCain be anything but a continuation of the Bush Administration. The way a candidate runs their campaign is one of the first examples of leadership and management that voters beyond Arizona have to make an informed choice.

The his campaign has been run by many of the people from the Bush campaign, and his style has been erratic and devoid of direction or organizing intellectual principles.

Posted by: jwallace1 | October 23, 2008 1:16 PM | Report abuse

old patriot says:
If the american people are gulliable enough to elect Obama they are fool's.

----------------

We already know how gullible and foolish half of the American people are....they voted in George Bush twice.

The other half get their more critical and wiser choice now with Obama. Stick around, old man, you may get top see what living with a true leader is like.

Posted by: wpost4112 | October 23, 2008 12:58 PM | Report abuse

If the american people are gulliable enough to elect Obama they are fool's.There is no way he can deliver on all the warm fuzzy's he clam's he can deliver.He has no experence and he is just one man!Carter had the experence but not the ball's[IRAN].Clinton did not have the military'suport.Multiple Chance's to take out Osama.Used cruse missle's when a 20 cent bullet would have done the trick.Asked his general adviser if we had some ninjis to slide in an grab him.The general lied said no.WE did and do!Had he known what he had and know how we would still have the world trade center's!Elect Obama and you better learn NCB warfare!and watch your wallet!He talk's the talk but can't walk the walk.WE need change but not his!!! A Indepent old warrior.out

Posted by: DryFrog | October 23, 2008 12:47 PM | Report abuse

Pennsylvania.

People wonder why McCain is putting such an effort into PA when it looks such a long shot. Look at the map. It isn't that he thinks he is likely to win in PA; it's that he sees he can't win without a big Kerry state. Obama is ahead in nearly a dozen Bush states -- some of them with more than enough EVs by themselves; McCain can't dream of holding them all.

----------

He must carry PA to win.

But personally, I find it exciting from a historical perspective...As victory for Lincoln began in Gettysburg, so will victory be won by Obama in PA.

And he can then finish the work begun by Abe.

Posted by: wpost4112 | October 23, 2008 12:34 PM | Report abuse

drindl, the 90% stat is a correct number, but it misleads as to what can be properly inferred from it. A large number of bills are supported by both parties. I would bet that BHO "supported GWB 65% of the time" because if you just count bills, that is the kind of stat you get. The real question is always where did the Senator split from party orthodoxy, not the raw % of shared votes. Using raw %s, Ds and Rs agree more than half the time.

Posted by: mark_in_austin | October 23, 2008 12:16 PM | Report abuse

In the last 48 hours Mccain has a new piece of Rhetoric.
"I have been tested" "They know who I am".
What does this mean? He has been saying things like
"I know how to win wars",
"I know how to catch Bin Ladin",
"I know how to fix the economy".
Any of this can be responded with one questions,
"How"
And now it is, "I have been tested and they know it". Who is they? What is this supposed to mean? His whole campaign can be reduced down to a few Rhetorical stump speech lines that don't mean anything.
If he knows how to do all these things why is he keeping it a secret? Is he blackmailing the public? Does he plan of sharing his magical knowledge with the new president should it not be John Mccain?
Enquiring minds want to know.

Posted by: popasmoke | October 23, 2008 12:14 PM | Report abuse

NPR reports on a poll sponsored by the Center for Rural Strategies. They ran a long poll from Oct 1 to Oct 21 to study the candidates' opinions in rural America.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=96008609&ft=1&f=1001

"The survey had Democrat Barack Obama slightly ahead, 46 to 45 percent, among the rural voters polled. That's a statistical dead heat during the survey period.

"That is really bad news for John McCain. If the rural vote is essentially split in these swing states, then John McCain is certain to lose," says Seth McKee, a political scientist at the University of South Florida in St. Petersburg. McKee specializes in rural voting patterns. ...

McKee speculates that the nation's economic crisis, the war in Iraq and disappointment with the Bush presidency may be taking a long-term toll on the rural Republican base, especially beyond Southern states.

"I think it's very possible that these rural folks who live above the Mason-Dixon Line could be ripe to move … away from the Republican Party," McKee says."

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 23, 2008 12:14 PM | Report abuse

King of Zouk... are those numbers for real Virginia, or all of Virginia? I suspect just real Virginia, because his lead overall is somewhere in the range of 15 points according to most polling data coming in today. It is easy to forget that most real voters live in NOVA.

Posted by: hiberniantears | October 23, 2008 12:14 PM | Report abuse

Pennsylvania.

People wonder why McCain is putting such an effort into PA when it looks such a long shot. Look at the map. It isn't that he thinks he is likely to win in PA; it's that he sees he can't win without a big Kerry state. Obama is ahead in nearly a dozen Bush states -- some of them with more than enough EVs by themselves; McCain can't dream of holding them all.

Posted by: F_L_Palmer | October 23, 2008 12:12 PM | Report abuse

Mason/dixon in VA:

10/20-21 Mac 45 Obama 47

Posted by: king_of_zouk | October 23, 2008 12:09 PM | Report abuse

I saw three Republican women on Larry King last week. One of them, Buchannon, was the usual spinning, toxic, nasty sort, but the other two were thoughtful. Both of them had fathers that were close friends of Ronarld Reagan who had been memebers of the Reagan Administration. What they had to say about the McCain campaign was simply amazing. They said that the people running McCain's campaign were the very people that Reagan had fired, were the sort of dishonest and underhanded sort of operatives that will cost the entire Republican Party. THAT, "my friends", is what we are seeing today. John McCain placed his campaign and very soul in the hands of some of the worst low lifes this country has ever produced and it will cost Republican candidates across the board. About the only people I see anywhere defrending McCain these days are the dangerously hysterical lunatics who, I hope and trust, are being watched very closely by the Secret Service. One thing I want to be certain of is that everything more dangerouis than a plastic spoon is confiscated from these nut cases. I like target shooting and hunting but there is no way any of these people should have access to any sort of weapon. Disarm them, watch them, isolate them.

Posted by: mibrooks27 | October 23, 2008 12:05 PM | Report abuse

Oh man... McCain is really, really toast. Mondale had better numbers than this Turkey.

Posted by: hiberniantears | October 23, 2008 12:03 PM | Report abuse

"Mccain is a seasoned campaigner and understands where the votes are."

Huh? Has Senator McCain faced a credible threat to his seat since his first term in the Senate? I don't think Sen McCain has the first clue about where the votes are - he was back in Iowa a week or two ago, a state where he's never been popular and is down by double digits now. Where does this 'seasoned campaigner' stuff come from?

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 23, 2008 12:02 PM | Report abuse

"What is being so carefully hid in all areas of Obama's life?"

I'm told that Obama's records have been stored with George Bush's Nat'l Guard records.

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 23, 2008 11:54 AM | Report abuse
--------------------

BETTER HOW ABOUT THIS

JOHN MCCAIN, TRAITOR TO HIS COUNTRY, COLLABORATOR WITH THE ENEMY, MILITARY DISGRACE.
Ted Sampley, a Vietnam Veteran and former Green Beret, issued a CHALLENGE to John McCain "If you can show us that the information presented in our mailer is untruthful . . . we will Stand Down" This CHALLENGE was issued during an interview with INSIDE EDITION on January 17, 2008.
John, family members of Vietnam POW/MIA(s) have been waiting for more then 14 years for you to have the courage to face them eye to eye in front of the American Public - Here is your opportunity for some "STRAIGHT TALK." Stop hiding behind your fabricated "War Hero" persona. You know we can prove your collaborations with declassified government documents . . . It is time for the American people to get to know the REAL John McCain - the John McCain that the POW/MIA families witnessed during the 1991-93 US Senate Select Committee on POW/MIA Affairs .
Bring It On John! HERE IS OUR NUMBER 252-527-0442
*********** ************* ************** *********** ***********
Activists accused McCain of stonewalling the release of POW records because they contained evidence he had collaborated with the North Vietnamese.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yoseBNetlEk

Posted by: popasmoke | October 23, 2008 11:57 AM | Report abuse

Considering his (THE ONE) performance in the primaries in PA and other similar locations, I find it plausible that it is very close there. Mccain is a seasoned campaigner and understands where the votes are. If he wins PA, game over for messiah. It ended up being only two points in the last election and that was with a "military" Dem. I don't suppose those bible thumpin' gun nuts are going to like Mr Weak knees.

Posted by: king_of_zouk | October 23, 2008 11:57 AM | Report abuse

McCain might have had a chance at shaking the connection with Bush if he had followed the instincts he used to have back in 2000. If McCain had ditched the radical fundamendalist wing of Christianity, if he had denounced the Bush policy of cronyism and indifference over Katrina, if he had stuck with his initial opposition to Bush tax breaks for rich plutocrats, then maybe McCain might have convinced us that he was not Bush-lite.

Instead McCain, by picking the mind-numbingly incompetant Palin, has reinforced the Bush connection. She is a folksy fundamentalist, a shrill and proudly illiterate governor from a western state (part of the Real America) just like Bush. She is unmoored to the concerns and anxieties of everyday Americans and is smugly pleased with her ignorance of the ways of the rest of the world. Just like Bush.

We do not need a second coming of the disasterous Bush. We do not need or want McCain/Palin.

Posted by: dee5 | October 23, 2008 11:54 AM | Report abuse

"What is being so carefully hid in all areas of Obama's life?"

I'm told that Obama's records have been stored with George Bush's Nat'l Guard records.

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 23, 2008 11:54 AM | Report abuse

zouk deludes:

Poor zouk, more like poor messiah. His campaign has now let it slip that he is only up by two in PA. Add that to FL, VA, OH, MO, CO, NH- all pretty much even or Mac ahead and you are looking at THE ONE's victory slipping away. He should have kept his truthful views to himself.
------------------------

Poor, poor Zouk.

Posted by: wpost4112 | October 23, 2008 11:53 AM | Report abuse

bongbrain - I guess you missed the mason dixon poll in FL that clearly found that 80% of military supports McCain.

what have you been taking that makes you actually believe the armed forces wants to lose. that Libs will lower taxes and spend less. you, my friend, are delusional.

Posted by: king_of_zouk | October 23, 2008 11:52 AM | Report abuse

" His campaign has now let it slip that he is only up by two in PA. "

I'm surprised that you, of all people, believe a word he says. What if they're playin' you and internals show something completely different?

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 23, 2008 11:52 AM | Report abuse


This campaign has shown that McCain acts without really thinking about the outcome. Is this the kind of president we want?

The still picture showing him with his tongue hanging out after the third debate about sums it up. He doesn't know which way to go.

bcamp55 - your colors are showing.

Posted by: docastro58 | October 23, 2008 11:47 AM | Report abuse
----------------

WHAT SOME OF THE PEOPLE WHO KNOW HIM BEST SAY ABOUT JOHN MCCAIN.......

"He is a vicious person"
Former representative Charles LeBoutillier R-NY
---------------
"An embarrassment to the party"
Arizona GOP state senator Susan Johnson
---------------
"There is nothing redeeming about John Mccain...he's a hypocrite"
Former house GOP whip Tom DeLay
-----------------
"The thought of him being president sends a chill down my spine. He is erratic"
Senator Thad Cochran, R- MS
------------------
"Hard headed is one way to say it. Arrogant is another way to say it. It's a quality about him that disturbs me".
Larry Wilkerson, former chief aide to Colin Powell
------------------
"What happens if he gets angry in a crisis...? It's the presidents job to negotiate and stay calm. I just don't see that he has that quality".
Former Arizona GOP chairman John Hinz
-------------------
"His temper would place this country at risk...and the world perhaps in danger. In my mind that should disqualify him"
Former Senator Bob Smith, R-NM
-------------------
"I decided I didn't want this guy anywhere near a trigger."
Senator Pete Domenici, R-NM

Posted by: popasmoke | October 23, 2008 11:51 AM | Report abuse

Chris this is a mean picture of McCain. I wonder why media does not explain why Hussien Obama hides "Everything" from his past. That is why he is an empty suit. Obama and the entire News Media hide all facts about his past. Now Obama is in Hawaii supposed to be with his ailing Grandmother. But, the sudden trip comes when there is also legal action and investigation regarding his elusive Birth Certificate. Coincidence? Maybe. What is wrong with that Birth Certificate that he will not release it? Also, what is wrong with any or all of his records even from College, because he has not released ANY of them? What is being so carefully hid in all areas of Obama's life? We who have researched know, but the average citizen certainly does not thanks to the Media Blackout on Obama.

Posted by: nsabetus | October 23, 2008 11:50 AM | Report abuse

McCain had to win the primary by convincing the Republican faithful that he would be the continuation of Bush. He has to win the general by convincing independents that he will be a complete change from Bush.
Meanwhile, he has to keep everybody convinced that he is the "straight talker."

Posted by: F_L_Palmer | October 23, 2008 11:48 AM | Report abuse

This campaign has shown that McCain acts without really thinking about the outcome. Is this the kind of president we want?

The still picture showing him with his tongue hanging out after the third debate about sums it up. He doesn't know which way to go.

bcamp55 - your colors are showing.

Posted by: docastro58 | October 23, 2008 11:47 AM | Report abuse

Poor zouk, more like poor messiah. His campaign has now let it slip that he is only up by two in PA. Add that to FL, VA, OH, MO, CO, NH- all pretty much even or Mac ahead and you are looking at THE ONE's victory slipping away. He should have kept his truthful views to himself.

Posted by: king_of_zouk | October 23, 2008 11:45 AM | Report abuse

"McCain's pick of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin sent a strong signal that the Bush dominance of the GOP was over."
In what respect, Chris?

Posted by: princeleo | October 23, 2008 11:33 AM | Report abuse

These polls give us gas - our anxiety is soaring at the election draws near - are we alone? I don't think so. .............

http://thefiresidepost.com/2008/10/23/election-anxiety/

Posted by: glclark4750 | October 23, 2008 11:30 AM | Report abuse

Blarg writes
"+12 in OH is less plausible, though a Quinnipiac poll last week had +14. Some of the other Big Ten results are even more suspect; I don't believe Obama is leading by 9 in IN, or ~20% in MI and MN."

That's why I tried to find out more about the methodology. They didn't share much, except for the cryptic line about voters who 'intend' to register before election day. Here in MN, you can register at the polling station. My understanding is that registration is over in OH - if you're not registered now, you don't get a vote this year. So the question becomes: which states allow same-day registration, and are those the same states where the big 10 poll is most unlike other polls? If yes, does that mean the big 10 poll is 'wrong' or does it mean the other polls are wrong for eliminating people who will vote but fail their 'likely voter' test?

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 23, 2008 11:29 AM | Report abuse

bsimon, I don't think the Big Ten poll is PA is implausible. Every October PA poll but one has had Obama with a double-digit lead.

+12 in OH is less plausible, though a Quinnipiac poll last week had +14. Some of the other Big Ten results are even more suspect; I don't believe Obama is leading by 9 in IN, or ~20% in MI and MN.

Posted by: Blarg | October 23, 2008 11:21 AM | Report abuse

Oh-oh.

Latest polls show McCain losing the rural vote in key states:

"After trailing by 10 points in U.S. rural areas, Democrat Barack Obama is neck-and-neck with Republican John McCain among rural voters in 13 swing states, a potentially key group for winning the White House, according to a poll released on Thursday.

Obama was supported by 46 percent and McCain by 45 percent of 841 likely voters surveyed from October 5-21, as U.S. financial turmoil deepened, according to the poll commissioned by the nonpartisan Center for Rural Strategies in Whitesburg, Kentucky.

A month ago, the poll showed McCain led 51-41. This time, respondents said Obama would do better than McCain on the economy, taxes and "the financial crisis in the country."

Nearly 20 percent of Americans live in rural areas. They tend to be social and fiscal conservatives. President George W. Bush won rural districts nationwide by 19 points in 2004.

The poll showed rural voters have cooled from their initial enthusiasm for Sarah Palin, the Republican nominee for vice president. Forty percent view her favorably and 42 percent unfavorably, compared to a 48-33 split in September. Obama, McCain and Joe Biden, the Democratic nominee for vice president, had higher ratings than Palin in the new poll."

http://www.reuters.com/article/politicsNews/idUSTRE49M5SF20081023

Poor Zouk.

Posted by: wpost4112 | October 23, 2008 11:15 AM | Report abuse

If we take John McCain at his word, he will not continue George W. Bush's economic policies in one very important way: he will freeze government spending.

Good idea?

During an economic boom, when the economy needs no stimulus, this can be great. The savings could be used to pay off the national debt (too bad Bush didn't pay heed).

But we are in a deepening recession, by the heavy layoffs that are now going on, it looks to be severe and long lasting.

We have seen what happens when a President responds to an economic down-turn with rigid frugality.

This was the policy of Herbert Hoover, and it was this that drove what could have been an ordinary recession into the Great Depression.

McCain is promising not be George W. Bush, but to be Herbert Hoover instead.

This is an offer we must refuse.

Posted by: careysub | October 23, 2008 11:08 AM | Report abuse

"A new Big Ten poll shows huge leads for Obama in the Big Ten states. So huge, in fact, that the results seem a touch implausible. They report 11 point leads in both PA & OH."

Perhaps implausible. The candidates internal polling is showing a 2% difference. That is shy McCain is still campaigning in PA dispite what the other polls show.

Posted by: leapin | October 23, 2008 11:03 AM | Report abuse

Barrack “Santa” Obama has made numerous statements that defy the laws of economics and the mathematics of tax collection and never offers “how”. Just believe in Santa.

Posted by: leapin | October 23, 2008 11:00 AM | Report abuse

"Outstanding piece in Time magazine about why Obama is winning:

http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1853025-1,00.html

Highly recommended!"

I concur. I read it. (I didn't click on this link, but its a Joe Klein article that I think is being referred to.)

Posted by: DDAWD | October 23, 2008 10:57 AM | Report abuse

Another note on the big ten poll I referenced earlier (below). It appears they are polling registered voters - and voters who intend to register by election day. This latter factor could account for the huge numbers they're reporting; I'm unaware of any other polls that include 'intend to register' voters. Most 'likely voter' filters will exclude such folks from the sample. Nate at 538 discusses such filters at his website in a post earlier this week.

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 23, 2008 10:55 AM | Report abuse

In the last 48 hours Mccain has a new piece of Rhetoric.
"I have been tested" "They know who I am".
What does this mean? He has been saying things like
"I know how to win wars",
"I know how to catch Bin Ladin",
"I know how to fix the economy".
Any of this can be responded with one questions,
"How"
And now it is, "I have been tested and they know it". Who is they? What is this supposed to mean? His whole campaign can be reduced down to a few Rhetorical stump speech lines that don't mean anything.
If he knows how to do all these things why is he keeping it a secret? Is he blackmailing the public? Does he plan of sharing his magical knowledge with the new president should it not be John Mccain?
Enquiring minds want to know.

Posted by: popasmoke | October 23, 2008 10:48 AM | Report abuse

So I was poking around, looking for coverage and opinions regarding the election and stumbled on these two surveys. They focus on a couple of the biggest issues relating to college students (and others), the economic crisis and racial prejudice. I think that they're fairly thorough and touch on very important aspects that the candidates will need to deal with. If you get a minute, fill them out so we can finally be heard!!

http://www.campuscompare.com/survey/economic


http://www.campuscompare.com/survey/prejudice

Posted by: bobbyblue | October 23, 2008 10:34 AM | Report abuse

A new Big Ten poll shows huge leads for Obama in the Big Ten states. So huge, in fact, that the results seem a touch implausible. They report 11 point leads in both PA & OH.

http://www.bigtenpoll.org/

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 23, 2008 10:22 AM | Report abuse

One side to the SP coin is that she is bringing McCain down. The other side is that she is pushing him up. I subscribe to the latter.

Posted by: leapin | October 23, 2008 10:14 AM | Report abuse
----------------

I agree, if she had just been a little better he could have sold her. As it turned out she is terrible and even came with baggage. Mccan could have picked any one of a number of qualified women and this would have been a very close tough race he may have won. One poll out now says 34% will not vote for Mccain just because of Palin. How do you overcome a number like that?

Posted by: popasmoke | October 23, 2008 10:21 AM | Report abuse

leapin- being two sides of the same coin, perhaps both statements are true. Gov Palin is certainly boosting the evangelical vote for McCain. But she appears to also be dampening support among the swing voters.

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 23, 2008 10:20 AM | Report abuse

. The stat that he voted "with GWB" 90% of the time is also misleading - would I be incorrect if I assumed BHO voted "with GWB" 65% of the time? "

But McCain himself said it. There is video. There is video of McCain saying a lot of things that he now claims he didn't say. Who do you trust, me or your lyin' eyes?

Republicans are moving further and further away from reality every day.

Posted by: drindl | October 23, 2008 10:19 AM | Report abuse

One side to the SP coin is that she is bringing McCain down. The other side is that she is pushing him up. I subscribe to the latter.

Posted by: leapin | October 23, 2008 10:14 AM | Report abuse

COULD A LAST-MINUTE VP SWITCHEROO SAVE McCAIN?

Sarah Palin's rhetoric reflects Bushie philosophy and policy to a greater extent than does McCain's own speechifying.

The fact that a couple of polls show McCain a close second seems to bolster the argument that he could have overcome the Bush albatross had he not chosen Palin.

With only 13 days out, it seems highly unlikely -- but if Palin suddenly felt a need to recuse herself from the race "for family reasons," McCain might be able to regain some lost support -- especially if he chose a mainstream Republican as her replacement, someone like Mitt Romney or Tim Pawlenty.

The Alaska investigations into her expense accounting and the Troopergate affair could supply McCain the rationale to make a dramatic last-minute pivot. A VP shocker also could serve as cover for more covert efforts to swing the vote; some analysts would attribute a last-minute McCain surge to the Palin dumping, and not to "irregularities" in the voting process.

ARE THE McCAIN-PALIN CROWD AGITATORS THE SAME STORMTROOPERS WHO DO THIS:

http://www.nowpublic.com/world/american-gestapo-state-supported-terrorism-targets-u-s-citizens

TARGETING OF AMERICANS BY GOV'T AGENCIES
A ROOT CAUSE OF WALL STREET MELTDOWN?

http://www.nowpublic.com/world/targeting-u-s-citizens-govt-agencies-root-cause-wall-street-financial-crisis

OR http://members.nowpublic.com/scrivener

Posted by: scrivener50 | October 23, 2008 10:09 AM | Report abuse

Yes, Chris, but of course back then in early summer he didn't have his base. So staying with GWB was his way of trying to do that... remember last summer? Seems like two years ago...
BTW, are you ok? You seemed pretty edgy last night on Rachel...get some sleep and stay away from the no-doz. I like your reporting and you're young enough to be my son, so get some chicken soup.

Posted by: coloradobluesky | October 23, 2008 10:09 AM | Report abuse

IS OBAMA THE 2ND COMING OF CARTER? 13.5% INFLATION ANYONE?

Ralph Reilan- IBD Today-

Obama gets to his reassuring 98% figure by lumping firms with no employees, the majority of small businesses, with small businesses that have 50 or 100 employees. Census data show that 79% of all American companies, counting both large and small firms, have no employees.

Similarly, the SBA's Office of Advocacy reports that 52% of small businesses in the U.S. economy are home-based — that is, not exactly the heavy-hitters when it comes to job creation.

As the New York Times reported regarding the makeup of the nation's 27 million small businesses: "According to figures compiled by the Small Business Administration, there are fewer than six million small businesses that actually have employees. The rest are so-called non-employer firms that report income from hobbies or freelance work done by their registered owners, earning as little as $1,000 a year."

By treating a lemonade stand the same as a home builder with 100 employees, Obama can get away with saying that 98% of small businesses in America won't be hit by his proposed increases in income taxes.

He's telling the 59 million employees in the small-business sector there's almost no chance, specifically a 2% chance, that their jobs or incomes will be negatively affected by his proposed tax hikes and policies to "spread the wealth around." In fact, Obama's proposed tax hike on incomes over $250,000 is precisely aimed at the small businesses that are generating the highest revenues and hiring the most workers.

"Two-thirds of small business profits are earned in households making more than $250,000 per year," reports Americans for Tax Reform. "In 2006, $473 billion of the $706 billion of small business profits was earned in households Obama has said he would raise taxes on."

Obama's proposed increases in income taxes and Social Security taxes would shift the bulk of the profits in the small-business sector to the federal coffers, reports Americans for Tax Reform:

"The tax rate on the lion's share of small business income could reach 54.9% under a President Obama. The individual top rate will climb from 35% to 39.6% and the Social Security/Medicare tax rate could climb from 2.9% to 15.3%. Put those together and you get 54.9%."

By increasing costs, Obama's higher business taxes would have the direct effect of increasing layoffs and raising prices. His proposed 54.9% tax rate would be the highest since the Carter administration, when the nation's unemployment and inflation rates peaked, respectively, at 7.6% and 13.5%.

Posted by: thecannula | October 23, 2008 10:08 AM | Report abuse

popasmoke and billdaviscbs, you're both kinda right and kinda wrong. First, the Miltary Times "Poll" wasn't even a poll—it was an online popularity vote. Since all respondents were self-selected, there's no chance it's representative of any definable demographic.

Second, papasmoke's point is correct. Military Times readers include a substantial percentage of retirees, and are much older, much whiter, and higher in rank (for both officer and enlisted ranks) then the military as a whole (except for that last, kind of like Hillary's West Virginia primary vote). Even an accurately representative sample of those readers wouldn't match active-duty military.

Taken together, those facts mean the results can be properly disregard.

Third, popasmoke made a mistake. The survey to which he's referring says campaign donations from active-duty military run 6-1 for Obama for those deployed overseas; and 3-1 Obama overall. Most valid polls show the overall active-duty military vote favors McCain but by less than 60% (much lower than favored Bush in 2000 and 2004).

But thanks, papasmoke, for bringing it up.

Posted by: malis | October 23, 2008 10:06 AM | Report abuse

IS OBAMA THE 2ND COMING OF CARTER? 13.5% UNEMPLOYMENT ANYONE?

Ralph Reilan- IBD Today-

Obama gets to his reassuring 98% figure by lumping firms with no employees, the majority of small businesses, with small businesses that have 50 or 100 employees. Census data show that 79% of all American companies, counting both large and small firms, have no employees.

Similarly, the SBA's Office of Advocacy reports that 52% of small businesses in the U.S. economy are home-based — that is, not exactly the heavy-hitters when it comes to job creation.

As the New York Times reported regarding the makeup of the nation's 27 million small businesses: "According to figures compiled by the Small Business Administration, there are fewer than six million small businesses that actually have employees. The rest are so-called non-employer firms that report income from hobbies or freelance work done by their registered owners, earning as little as $1,000 a year."

By treating a lemonade stand the same as a home builder with 100 employees, Obama can get away with saying that 98% of small businesses in America won't be hit by his proposed increases in income taxes.

He's telling the 59 million employees in the small-business sector there's almost no chance, specifically a 2% chance, that their jobs or incomes will be negatively affected by his proposed tax hikes and policies to "spread the wealth around." In fact, Obama's proposed tax hike on incomes over $250,000 is precisely aimed at the small businesses that are generating the highest revenues and hiring the most workers.

"Two-thirds of small business profits are earned in households making more than $250,000 per year," reports Americans for Tax Reform. "In 2006, $473 billion of the $706 billion of small business profits was earned in households Obama has said he would raise taxes on."

Obama's proposed increases in income taxes and Social Security taxes would shift the bulk of the profits in the small-business sector to the federal coffers, reports Americans for Tax Reform:

"The tax rate on the lion's share of small business income could reach 54.9% under a President Obama. The individual top rate will climb from 35% to 39.6% and the Social Security/Medicare tax rate could climb from 2.9% to 15.3%. Put those together and you get 54.9%."

By increasing costs, Obama's higher business taxes would have the direct effect of increasing layoffs and raising prices. His proposed 54.9% tax rate would be the highest since the Carter administration, when the nation's unemployment and inflation rates peaked, respectively, at 7.6% and 13.5%.

Posted by: thecannula | October 23, 2008 10:06 AM | Report abuse

I love the continuing name-calling and divisive insults we get from the McCain dead-enders. They reinforce the growing public rejection of the old politics, and they help marginalize the extremists who will soon turn to expressing their knee-jerk opposition to everything proposed by the Obama administration.

The most important thing that has turned the race to Obama may not be McCain's erratic embrace of Bush policies, but rather his firm embrace of Bush-Rove-Fox campaign tactics.

Keep it up, guys.

Posted by: FlownOver | October 23, 2008 9:49 AM | Report abuse
----------------

I have not experienced anything like this is many many years. I was in a Walgreens and wearing an Obama shirt. The woman in front of me, well dressed older woman, looked at my shirt and said, "I would never vote for that ni&&er, how could you wear a shirt like that". By contrast when I run into Obama supporters there is always a smile or thumbs up. The is such a difference between the Mccain supporters and Obama supporters it is amazing. I can only believe it is race based and nothing else. I grew up in the south and race is the only thing I ever experienced that produced that kind of hate. By the way, When the woman left people in the line began to comment on what had just happened and were in shock. Hate has really reared it's ugly head in the election, this website is not the only place you will find open hate. I have not had anyone talk to me like that ever. I am a big guy and look like a biker with long hair and a long beard. People don't usually screw around with me.

Posted by: popasmoke | October 23, 2008 10:03 AM | Report abuse

I agree that McCain's troubles are of his own making. First, he mismanaged his campaign to such an extent that he had to embrace the Shrub's policies as the only way to gain the nomination.

Then he could have selected a responsible and respected candidate for his VP, but he didn't. Since the Republican convention, he embraced the Rovian playbook to conduct an embarrassingly negative campaign.

In person, McCain's message has been all over the lot, sometimes a slashingly negative personal attack that incites, not excites his supporters. Other times, he haltingly tries to discuss economics, and does so poorly.

Essentially, John McCain's appearances have only emphasized a primary difference between him and Obama: McCain is a shoot-from-the-hip person while Obama is thoughtful and deliberative. For good or bad, the other contrast is passion: McCain has plenty, while Obama shows surprisingly little. Many of us see this showing that McCain loves being a candidate, while Obama prefers to display a calm, thoughtful clarity that many of us equate with leadership.

Posted by: bulldog6 | October 23, 2008 9:59 AM | Report abuse

I think McCain's biggest problem is only partially the policy positions he shares with President Bush. Senator McCain is trying to have too many issues both ways. He talks about a record of bipartisanship and reaching across the aisle, but on the campaign trail talks about which part of the country is 'most patriotic'. I'll tell you what, Senator, if you want votes in Minnesota, don't go to Pennsylvania and tell them they're more patriotic than we are. The way his running-mate behaves on the campaign trail further emphasises the disparity between what he says he stands for and what he apparently stands for.

In short, when your reputation is for being a straight-talking, trustworthy politician, you'd better walk the walk. Once you lose that trust, its extremely difficult to regain it.

Posted by: bsimon1 | October 23, 2008 9:55 AM | Report abuse

"McCain's pick of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin sent a strong signal that the Bush dominance of the GOP was over."

For VP, McCain picked the folksy, religious, grammar-impaired governor of a large "frontier" state. How does that signal the end of Bush dominance? True, he didn't pick a member of the Bush administration, but he picked the closest thing to a female George W Bush available.

Posted by: Blarg | October 23, 2008 9:54 AM | Report abuse

Outstanding piece in Time magazine about why Obama is winning:

http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1853025-1,00.html

Highly recommended!

Posted by: Bondosan | October 23, 2008 9:49 AM | Report abuse

I love the continuing name-calling and divisive insults we get from the McCain dead-enders. They reinforce the growing public rejection of the old politics, and they help marginalize the extremists who will soon turn to expressing their knee-jerk opposition to everything proposed by the Obama administration.

The most important thing that has turned the race to Obama may not be McCain's erratic embrace of Bush policies, but rather his firm embrace of Bush-Rove-Fox campaign tactics.

Keep it up, guys.

Posted by: FlownOver | October 23, 2008 9:49 AM | Report abuse

How come the Washington Post didn't report this? This is our military ! or did I mis it.
http://www.militarytimes.com/static/projects/pages/081003_ep_2pp.pdf

Posted by: billdaviscbs | October 23, 2008 8:57 AM | Report abuse
--------------------------

You got my interest because I know that that is not the case. In looking it up and seeing who owns the web site I found this. That poll was done as an on line poll of the subscribers of the website. Here is the problem. The subscribers to that website don't represent an overall survey of military men on active service. People who would subscribe to a website like that would represent a more gung ho segment as well. The survey drew around 4000 replies.

Here is the point. It would be like if I took a survey of readers of a website that was about billiards and asked what is your favorite game? I would probably get a result that 99% think billiards is the greatest game. It would be false for me though to publish that result as being representative of people other then those who read my billiard website.
Kind of like taking a poll at a rally for Mccain or Obama. your results are not going to be very accurate.

Previous figures published have shown that Active duty military are supporting Obama at a rate of 6 to 1. This is also born out with donations to each candidate from the military.
I didn't find the website to be bias in any way but this is from their website regarding the on line survey,

IT ALSO SEEMS THE PEOPLE SURVEYED ARE MOSTLY NOT ON ACTIVE DUTY BUT RETIRED.

QUOTE FROM THE WEBSITE:

"The results of the Military Times 2008 Election Poll are not representative of the opinions of the military as a whole. The group surveyed is older, more senior in rank and less ethnically diverse than the overall armed services."

Posted by: popasmoke | October 23, 2008 9:40 AM | Report abuse

How come the Washington Post didn't report this? This is our military ! or did I mis it.
http://www.militarytimes.com/static/projects/pages/081003_ep_2pp.pdf

Posted by: billdaviscbs | October 23, 2008 8:57 AM | Report abuse

McCain bragged, on video, that he voted with Bush over 90% of the time. Bush brutalized McCain in 2000 and then in 2004 McCain did everything he could to kiss up and get Bush re-elected. That was a cynical political move and it set the tone for everything's thats happened since then. McCain has taken on the Rovian tactics that Bush used. His major choices, i.e. Palin and others, have been to attract the rabid base that Bush created. His and Palin's rallies have been aimed at exciting the base in a negative way and have resulted in death threats against the Ohio Attorney General, against Acorn executives and against anyone else they aim their vitriol at. That's not bipartisan. That's not uniting. That's not the American way. Very few people outside of the angry republican base believe anything McCain says anymore. He has been erratic, fragmented, unsteady and frighteningly reactive. Every day brings a new round of desperate measures and no genuine leadership from the McCain Campaign. Enough, and way more than enough. We aren't buying it anymore.

Posted by: karela | October 23, 2008 8:54 AM | Report abuse

I am infinitely more comfortable with McCain=Bush than I am with-
Obamoron=Chavez
Obamoron=Wright
Obamoron=Rezko
Obamoron=Jimmy carter
Obamoron=Surrender in the war on terror
Obamoron=Increased taxes
Obamoron=Conciliatory talks with Muslims
Obamoron=Putin
Obamoron=Increased energy cost
Obamoron=Increased treats from abroad
Obamoron=Castro

Posted by: Bcamp55 | October 23, 2008 8:51 AM | Report abuse

McCain wants us all to believe that he will do something different, that the will "reach across the aisle" and yet his campaign has done nothing to show that. Instead, he has tried to turn the GOP into the party of "Bubba" and used that position to try to belittle the Democrats. The whole "Joe the Plumber" thing is typical of this - pure McCain "double-talk".

The GOP are all now saying "bipartisanship" - but that's because it's their only chance - I didn't hear much of that talk eight, or even four, years ago, but now they are on their back foot and off balance they want to "buddy up". It's too late - we have seen what the GOP has done, and we don't like it. We do not want more of the same, and that, in the end, is all McCain has to offer.

Posted by: Limey51 | October 23, 2008 8:19 AM | Report abuse

As President, McCain will be nothing like Bush...he'll suspend the Presidency and tackle our most urgent problems by freezing spending, cutting taxes, and watch McCainvilles fill with the unemployed as the rich extract their earnings and move to China.

Then Russian will invade Georgia again and McCain will initiate nuclear war, without blinking.

Posted by: quatzecoutl | October 23, 2008 7:55 AM | Report abuse

Here's the problem that McCain has: He supports the same policies as Bush. Americans are tired of tax cuts for the rich, endless wars in the Middle East, and the same divide and conquer politics. We have seen what a Republican government where Republicans control all three branches of government does and we don't like it. It is time to give the Democrats a shot at running a government where they control both the executive and legislative branches of goverment.

Posted by: mrgavel | October 23, 2008 7:54 AM | Report abuse

This country is lucky to have a guy like McCain still in the race and ready to lead the nation. McCain has the skills to take on the lobbyists and right the economy on a longterm basis.


The media is out of its mind this year.

McCain is correct - he is not Bush - the democrats have pushed a deception onto the American people - everytime I think of deception and lies now I think of Obama smiling from ear to ear during the debate to hide making any expression that he has been caught deceiving and lying.

Bush smeared McCain in South Carolina, the two do NOT get along.

When is it possible for the democrats to tell the truth? By the way THIS IS THE THIRD BUSH TERM. Bush 1 was from 1989-1993 and his son is on his second term. McCain deserves his turn to run this country properly and the media is going to be amazed at how solid a President McCain will be.

.


.

.

Posted by: 37thandOSt | October 23, 2008 7:40 AM | Report abuse

He lost the 2000 GOP primary because he wasn't enough like Bush and now he's about to lose because he's too much like Bush. He did it to himself though; he bent over backwards to please the social conservatives and hoped his pre-2000 record would be strong enough to appeal to independents. It was working to some extent but he completely ruined it by picking Sarah Palin to please the base. Contrary to their rhetoric, social conservatives turned the GOP into a fiscally irresponsible big government party. If McCain would be who he claims to be, he would have had the guts to lead the GOP back to its roots. The coalition of social and fiscal conservatives is starting to burst and even if McCain still somehow managed to win come November, I don't see it lasting another five years. A true maverick that puts his country first would have tried to build a new coalition that returns to the core principles of the Republican party and isn't solely driven by the culture wars, even if it would have cost him the election. He would have at least laid the groundwork for a proper alternative to the Dems four years from now. Right now we have a choice between tax and spend on the one hand and spend without paying on the other. If Obama is as great as his hardcore supporters think he is, he could build a dominant Democratic coalition that will last for decades. I doubt he'll have the guts to do it though (would require standing up against his own party in Congress) so let's hope that four years from now, the GOP will have freed itself from the stranglehold of the neocons. McCain could have been the maverick to start that revolution, but he put his campaign before his country...

Posted by: CohtR | October 23, 2008 7:40 AM | Report abuse

McCains best shot is to quit the Republican party until after the election.

Posted by: dijetlo | October 23, 2008 7:34 AM | Report abuse

McCain's biggest problem isn't Bush, it's his own 19th century ideas, erratic behavior and surly personality.

Posted by: jmp66 | October 23, 2008 7:13 AM | Report abuse

McCain lost any claim to distance himself from Bush when he adopted Rove's tactics for his campaign. Bush (and the Republicans) are unpopular for many reasons, including their predilection (and record)to divide and conquer. These tactics are being repudiated by the public on a large scale this election.

The choice of Palin also reinforces McCain's pandering to the Rovian wing of the party, rather than indicating a change in direction. This poor choice of a running mate has knocked him off his game and kept his campaign on the defense (along with many other missteps).

McCain would probably be a bit higher in the polls if he had ignored the radical right in the party and concentrated on gaining traction among moderates. I don't think McCain would win in this present environment, but he would probably be closer in the polls if he had trusted his gut rather than the nuts....

Posted by: RickJ | October 23, 2008 7:10 AM | Report abuse

Stick a fork in the dispute over the McCain/Bush relationship it's done. Too many pictures, too much video, and too many votes for Bush programs.
Hell, Bush and McCain were sharing a cake together while African-Americans drowned in New Orleans!

Posted by: seemstome | October 23, 2008 6:58 AM | Report abuse

The GWB legacy was not of McC's making. The stat that he voted "with GWB" 90% of the time is also misleading - would I be incorrect if I assumed BHO voted "with GWB" 65% of the time? But McC took on the GWB mantle during the R primary and has not been able to distance himself from it. This was his own doing.

JD -

pls eml me at

mark_in_austin@operamail.com

Posted by: mark_in_austin | October 23, 2008 6:13 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company