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Who Won the Week?

If it's Friday, it's time for "Who Won the Week" -- The Fix competition in which our readers get to offer their opinion about whether John McCain or Barack Obama emerged victorious over the last seven days and why.

To the winner, goes the t-shirt. The Official Fix T-shirt, that is.

Obama spent the week in Hawaii on vacation but still managed to broker some peace at the upcoming Democratic National Convention by agreeing to let Hillary Rodham Clinton put her name up for nomination. As we noted yesterday, it was a savvy move by Obama as it shows a level of self-confidence as to his place in the party and represents the best tactic to bring disgruntled Clinton supporters back into the fold.

[UPDATE, 12:15 pm Saturday: Obama's campaign announced this morning that it had collected $51 million in July, leaving them with nearly $66 million in the bank. While that total dwarfs McCain's bank account, remember that McCain only needs cash through Sept. 4 -- when he becomes the official nominee of the party and receives more than $80 million in public financing -- while Obama, who opted out of public financing, needs cash to spend all the way through November 4. The Democratic National Committee also announced their July fundraising this morning: $27.7 million raised, $28.5 million on hand.]

As for McCain, he continued his non-stop tour of battleground states with stops in Pennsylvania, Michigan and Colorado. And, his campaign announced today that it had collected $27 million in July -- his largest single month haul to date -- and had $21 million left to spend. McCain's increased fundraising success will likely allow him to stay within financial shouting distance of Obama from now until he becomes the nominee on Sept. 4 although it is still likely that the Democrat will enjoy a spending edge.

The only other development this week was the increasing nastiness between the two campaigns over the television airwaves. Obama hit McCain on the DHL deal; McCain hit back with more footage of the cheering crowd from Berlin, Germany.

Make your pick for who won the week in the comments section below. The best entries are relatively concise and creative. We'll pluck the best of the best out and announce it in our "FixCam Week in Preview" post on Monday. All submissions must be made in the comments section and time stamped no later than midnight Saturday.

By Chris Cillizza  |  August 15, 2008; 7:07 PM ET
Categories:  Eye on 2008 , FixCam  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Friday Veepstakes Line: Crunch Time!
Next: Saddleback Forum: First Thoughts

Comments

McCain again.

If this is how Obama plans to win it, trying to out-Jesus and out-Hawk the Republicans, forget it, it's over.

Once again, the Democrats in their lame efforts to seem "strong" are seeming weak and unprincipled.

The bundlers in Obama's fund-raising effort must be sick right now. They have to go back to their largely pragmatic, socially-liberal, donors and have to explain why Obama is such a Theo-Con.

Obama only seems strong when he acts like himself, when he's sophisticated and scholarly and has strong views. When he's just agreeing with every Republican talking point, he's useless and by extension his party is useless.

Posted by: DexterManley | August 18, 2008 8:25 PM | Report abuse

My esteemed fellow commentator NJOHNSON is in error when he writes:

"MCSAME WE ARE NOT ALL GEORGIANS, OKAY! YOU BIG DUMMY!!!"

He's quite right that we are not all Georgians... if we were, we'd be at war with Russia right now. But McLame is not a big dummy. He was a fighter pilot, which means he was a small man, even back then. They don't even train big guys to be fighter pilots. And he's shrunk considerably, in the long years since.

Posted by: Iconoblaster | August 18, 2008 6:26 PM | Report abuse

I csn definately tell you who lost. It is John McCain. He finally admitted a moral lapse regarding his first marriage. Still there is an up to date moral lapse, ie offering up his wife for a topless contest, He claims he was kidding, etc, etc, but remember this is the guy who called his wife a C*** for all the world to hear. All this after he lied about membership in North Phoenix Baptist Church. I mean, does the guy have ANY integrity?

Posted by: Mari | August 18, 2008 5:13 PM | Report abuse

Republicans lie. That's what I learned this week. Republicans will say or do anything, assuming the American people are stupid. McCain used to be a man of principal - now he's being led around by the nose, and by some pretty unscruplous people. It's just sad.
Obama is a class act. He is his own man and he is the real thing. He will at least make an effort to bring about the changes we need as a country.
McSAME will be exactly that - more Bush mentality. More agression, more shooting from the hip without thinking, no concern for the middle class - Oh yeah, he'll say he's concerned - ask him how much a loaf of bread is right now. I promise you McSame has no idea - Joe Liebermann will have to whisper that into his ear. Yuck!
Go Obama!!

Posted by: CrazyMe | August 18, 2008 5:05 PM | Report abuse

There is a lot of evidence this week that Obama has hit the ceiling of his possible support. Gallup and Rasmussen have McCain either ahead of or tied with Obama, and the trend lines are more favorable to the Arizonan. The faction that is "undecided", even after unprecedented Obama hype, is a trouble sign for the Democrat; I believe most of these voters will break for McCain, that "undecided" is really a way of saying "I'm for McCain, but I don't particularly want to be called a racist for not supporting Obama". The John Edwards scandal reinforces for swing voters the conservative narrative that the MSM is not reliable on the subject of charismatic liberal politicians who know how to push the media's buttons. McCain won the week - but it won't be clear to the "conventional wisdom" of political journalism until after the election, when pundits are engaging in their recriminations.

Posted by: Mark Richard | August 18, 2008 3:44 PM | Report abuse

After kicking the week off on the cover of Time, spending an evening talking to Larry King, being featured in The Economist, and concluding the week by hosting both Obama and McCain, I'd say this was Rick Warren's week.

Posted by: Abby | August 18, 2008 3:44 PM | Report abuse

Obama won the week by holding steady to his course - by keeping family first in fact rather than rhetoric; giving thoughtful answers rather than sound bites; and by firing the opening shots in a change-the-game round. The American people know what the Repugnicans are about this time. Changing the face to McCain's doesn't change the goals of that party or the methods being used to reach them.

Posted by: wwwqueen | August 18, 2008 2:56 PM | Report abuse

Of course, it helps as we've now learned that John McSame was not in the "Cone of Silence", but riding in a motorcade to the building where the "Forum" was being held, while Sen. Barack Obama was being questioned. And, during that period of time, there was nothing that prevented John McSame from hearing the questions being asked of Sen. Obama and Sen. Obama's answers thereto. Do I think John McSame "cheated", you bet I do.

Specifically, we learn from the NYT: Before an audience of more than 2,000 people at the church, the candidates answered questions about policy and social issues.

Mr. Warren, the pastor of Saddleback, had assured the audience while he was interviewing Mr. Obama that “we have safely placed Senator McCain in a cone of silence” and that he could not hear the questions.

After Mr. Obama’s interview, he was joined briefly by Mr. McCain, and the candidates shook hands and embraced.

Mr. Warren started by asking Mr. McCain, “Now, my first question: Was the cone of silence comfortable that you were in just now?”

Mr. McCain deadpanned, “I was trying to hear through the wall.”

Interviewed Sunday on CNN, Mr. Warren seemed surprised to learn that Mr. McCain was not in the building during the Obama interview.

See: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/18/us/politics/18mccain.html?_r=1&adxnnl=1&oref=slogin&adxnnlx=1219068751-He+zpR1dK+Su8nYdzmExoA

Posted by: caliguy55 | August 18, 2008 1:46 PM | Report abuse

McCain won, of course! NoBama better stays another 2 weeks in Hawaii.

Posted by: tiger | August 18, 2008 1:04 PM | Report abuse

Mc Cain was like the student who decides the answers before he knew the questions. So no matter what the question was, that answer will have to fit. He was answering even before Warren was finished asking the question, and several times was way off in his answers. I was shocked to hear the media giving him such high points.
Mc Cain was shamelessly campaigning throughout the interview,(which the interview was not about) Wonder why he was allowed to get away with it. Also, his silly laughter throughout was very annoying.
Obama missed an opportunity to emphasise the point that he was not pro abortion- rather than just casually stating it- but despite this, he was against legislating his personal conviction on others, hence his option of pro-choice. Nobody in the media repeated that statement made by him- His fault.
Obama came across much more sincere than McCain.

Posted by: S | August 18, 2008 11:11 AM | Report abuse

Obama needs Hillary, and we need Obama to name her the Vice Presidential candidate!!

Posted by: Elea | August 18, 2008 10:48 AM | Report abuse

Obama's answer about a most crucial question on abortion was to try to pass the buck to God with his glib answer, "It is above his paygrade."
I think effort to evade the answer and to bring laughter was nothing short of stupidity...
He is neither qualified or desirable as president of America

Posted by: ruth | August 18, 2008 10:00 AM
************************************

It is McCain's answer that is glib. Despite language in the Bible itself about God "breathing life" into a woman's womb, the "Religious Right" 's pat (and false) certainty about the answer to the question shows their arrogance, as does Ruth's post here (I can only presume from the content and tone of her post that she is "one of them"). Obama's answer was by far the most honest--neither he or McCain has the scientific background to speak authoritatively to the issue. If by "qualified", Ruth means "sufficiently arrogant", then I agree that McCain has what it takes...

Posted by: pcp | August 18, 2008 10:39 AM | Report abuse

Obama's answer about a most crucial question on abortion was to try to pass the buck to God with his glib answer, "It is above his paygrade."
I think effort to evade the answer and to bring laughter was nothing short of stupidity...
He is neither qualified or desirable as president of America

Posted by: ruth | August 18, 2008 10:00 AM | Report abuse

Hey left-leaning-soon-to-be-losers (you know who you are)
Here's the situation straight from CNN- The race is tied; the bounce has evaporated; and John took the Forum (and the week). Furthermore we're all suffering from Obama fatigue- that rockstar act with the swooning etc. is looking like Spinal Tap II. Theres nothing like peaking too soon

Posted by: Scott | August 18, 2008 7:59 AM | Report abuse

"The National Enquirer won the week."

Agreed. Somehow, in all this John Edwards hoopla, people forget that this is, you know...the National Enquirer. I'm not about to fault anyone for disregarding what's published in those pages. There are sure a lot of hindsight fools out there. Even Drudge would be time better spent than skimming the pages of NE.

Posted by: DDAWD | August 18, 2008 4:35 AM | Report abuse

They both lost in N. Hudson, WI on Saturday. The two-hour local parade featured lots of politicians and each party had a float (so to speak). The Democrats had a van, more energy and more people, but they weren't helping themselves. The anti-war, clean energy signs were okay, but where are the lower-gas, it's the economy signs? And the Dem marchers need to go a little lighter on the hippie vibe. My friends daughter Morgan hid from them, whispering 'it's the Democrats,' which everyone thought was great. As he's apolitical on everything but baseball, his ex-wife is suspected of the indoctrination. The Republicans meanwhile had gone out and bought themselves a shiny new ATV and slapped two red, white & blue elephants on it. Seems the parade was an excuse for someone to buy a toy. The Republicans weren't exactly winning votes in a slightly Republican district, but the biggest liability for the Democrats are their volunteers and lip-service to the important issues while they wave signs on the issues that don't have any traction. Obviously this doesn't affect the race at the national level, but it is the exact same vibe I am getting from the national campaigns: the Republicans aren't trying and the far left-wing of the Democratic party is celebrating like Che just overthrew the govt.

And note to Ron Kind (D-WI), you might want to inform your campaign workers on how you voted on major pieces of legislation before they call people at home. I know more about your voting record than your own people.

Posted by: muD | August 18, 2008 12:15 AM | Report abuse

OBAMA WON THE WEEK!!! McSame didn't look presidential, HE LOOKED OLD! And stop hating on Obama because he went on vacation. McSame vacations every weekend while Barack is working. MCSAME WE ARE NOT ALL GEORGIANS, OKAY! YOU BIG DUMMY!!!

Posted by: NJOHNSON | August 17, 2008 10:20 PM | Report abuse

The fact that Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty flew to Washington, DC to be on Face The Nation, this morning, shows that he will be McCain's VP choice. He could have easily done a remote appearance, by satellite, and had no other business in DC. They are framing the picture to look nice.

Posted by: Thomas | August 17, 2008 8:24 PM | Report abuse

I see you fail to note EVEN ONE delegate who will switch from Obama, let alone the 10 I challenged you to find or the 200 needed to change the result.

And, it's been noted here before. Fairlington for where I live and Blade for the football team I support (Sheffield United). Up the Blades! You are, however, right that the faintly journalistic tone of it amuses me for blog purposes. I chose the name, however, long before I started posting here.

BB

Posted by: Fairlington Blade | August 17, 2008 7:29 PM | Report abuse

McCain resoundingly won the week.

But Obama first. He put in some family time which is to be respected for a candidate with young children during a week of trying out campaign surrogate Hillary Clinton. But Clinton's NV campaign-for-Obama debut fell into a black hole as it coincided neatly with the Edwards statement of admission of his affair cheating on his terminal-cancer wife. Then came Russia's invasion of Georgia, on which Obama couldn't speak without sounding callow and presumptuous. McCain spoke on the issue while Obama was being shot bodysurfing. Finally, the NY Times article leaked more killer info about the corrupt Edwards scandal as the Democratic Party chair, snarked up another round of race-baiting of Republicans by calling them the "White Party". Obama tells the audience at Saddleback that knowing when human rights are implied is "above [his] pay grade" and fumbled lamely on the "evil" question.

McCain was drowned out by the media by Obama coverage or being ignored, as usual, but he was able to publish an Op Ed in the NY Times, titled "We Are All Georgians", thereby getting some self-generated coverage of his Georgia positions and statements. Although these are being attacked rather than reported, that is better than being ignored. McCain also delivered a surprising, personally grounded, incisive and personally honest performance at Saddleback. He connected with the evangelical base and managed to seize opportunities to squeeze in a statement, like that declaring his energy plan that includes wind, solar, alternative and nuclear power. Being able to penetrate the "cone of silence" of media ignoring or misreporting him, like his Georgian statements and energy plan, and deliver above expectations in Saddleback, was a plus for McCain.

This is a second week of plusses for McCain, that followed up his incremental momentum from the fun-ads-week.

Posted by: AsperGirl | August 17, 2008 7:29 PM | Report abuse

I'm changing my vote, McCain lost the week- this is the beginning of the end for him.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/17/opinion/17rich.html?_r=1&ref=opinion&oref=slogin
"“McCain’s personal fortune traces back to organized crime in Arizona.”

Pro life in politics. Murder Inc in business.

Posted by: Corruption Anon | August 17, 2008 6:21 PM | Report abuse

Scrivener, we checked out your link and the computer did not fry so we apologize.

Some of your material on the site is thought-provoking and legitimate, but some of it is, well -- let's not go there...anyway, live and let live.
I'm beginning to think your trojan horse theory -- that HRC actually plans to steal enough votes at the convention to deny BO the first ballot and create a brokered convention -- may actually be true. Why else have she and the harpies spent so much energy insisting on the roll call? Of course she'll claim the rogue delegates did it on their own, over her objection -- yeah, right. Let's hope BO has some counter-move planned. Stay thirsty, my friend...

Posted by: Broadway Joe | August 17, 2008 5:36 PM | Report abuse

Hard to believe from reading these comments we all saw the same debate...

Posted by: philip | August 17, 2008 5:32 PM | Report abuse

John McCain was this week's winner. He called it right on Georgia/Russia - Obama would call in the UN although, unknown to Obama APPARENTLY, Russia has veto power- would those 300 Obama advisers ADVISE him already --geez.... 5 members have veto power Barry now pay ATTENTION !!! Too funny. Many of the pro-liberal Obama robot media members said that this forum would be a disaster for McCain- they were deadwrong - like many other things !!! McCain gave direct answers and was amusing and informative. We got FLUFF from Obama -as usual.Perhaps his mind is on his big coronation next week. Turn off your t.v Monday thru Thursday or you'll succumb to sugar shock. NOBama - not now,not ever.

Posted by: jimbo | August 17, 2008 5:13 PM | Report abuse

BURIED IN TODAY'S WASH. POST: THE LATEST AFFRONT TO YOUR CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS

U.S. May Ease Police Spy Rules

The Justice Department has proposed a new domestic spying measure that would make it easier for state and local police to collect intelligence about Americans, share the sensitive data with federal agencies and retain it for at least 10 years.
-
By Spencer S. Hsu and Carrie Johnson


Comment:


CONGRESS MUST PROBE CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS ABUSES AND OVERTURN THIS DECISION -- BEFORE THIS JUDICIAL "BYPASS" TOTALLY DESTROYS THE RULE OF LAW IN AMERICA

At a time when members of government-funded volunteer "service" and "watch" organizations are accused of harassing, intimidating and possibly physically abusing citizens, the administration's defense is a "good" offense: Just say anything goes.

Local police authority has been usurped and sworn officers who are charged with protecting their communities from crime are being turned into secret agents.

We have descended into a police state; federal grants are funding the police use of dangerous "radiation energy" weapons that fire concentrated blasts of silent, invisible radiation. Victims of organized "gang stalking" allege that these weapons are being used to degrade the lives of these so-called "targets", whose lives are being financially and physically destroyed by an extra-legal "control mechanism" similar to that practiced by the Nazis, the Stasi and the KKK.

These are the "mechanics of personal destruction," using the war on terror as a convenient rationale for imposition of a police state.

Where are McCain and Obama on this? Will the national press corps even ask the question?

For more on "vigilante injustice" and "directed energy weapons," see:

http://members.nowpublic.com/scrivener

Posted by: scrivener | August 17, 2008 4:33 PM | Report abuse

I'm a big Obama supporter, but unfortunately, McCain won the week.

Why? Because in our highly-polarized, evenly-split electorate, every second counts until Election Day.

A week on vacation is a week lost.

Posted by: Doug in NYC | August 17, 2008 2:50 PM | Report abuse

I think that McCain has had a good month, he has raised his biggest fundraising haul, has driven Obama to the right on some issues and has sent Obama's poll leads in some battleground states back towards neutral.

I think Obama has to hit back at McCain and stop playing defence, which at the moment is suiting McCain. Policy won't win this election, it is sad to say, Republicans won't let this election become embroiled in policy, the can't afford to: the Republican party is bankrupt on the policy front. Eight years of a GOP White House have led where exactly?

Obama has to hit McCain hard on all fronts, but particularly the one that matters: character. Voters vote for the person who they think shares their world view the most. By painting Obama as a vacuous celebrity they are distancing him from ordinary voters, which is incredible when you consider the backgrounds of the two candidates:
- Obama, from a single parent family dragged himself up, through college and law school. Proved himself to have a brilliant legal mind. What's more he proved his character by his community work in Chicago.
- McCain, priviledged son of an admiral. I will make no attacks on his war record, that is between McCain and his Maker. Married into one of the wealthiest families in Arizona and ran for Senate. Wears $500 shoes.

So my view, McCain won the week, and actually, the last month. How can he have turned Obama's successful overseas trip into a negative?

Lets hope Obama comes back out hard after his vacation.

Posted by: Mike | August 17, 2008 1:39 PM | Report abuse

"ARROGANT behavior of a candidate pretending to be president."

Kinda like a global victory lap before the Democratic convention in Denver?

What was that all about..checking with his keepers in Moscow & Bejing ?
At least we know which side Mc Cain was on when he spoke out against the Russians.

Obama Confirms Relationship With Red Mentor - FOXBusiness.com



http://www.foxbusiness.com/story/obama-confirms-relationship-red-mentor/

Posted by: rtfanning | August 17, 2008 1:33 PM | Report abuse

Hands down Obama won the week. John McCain was completely presumptious and out of line sending his own delegation to Georgia. Claiming all Americans are Georgian's - WHO asked him to speak for me??? Coming out with policy before the President himself had an opportunity to respond. John McCain only appealed to those that already support him. Independents in the middle I am sure are completely turned off by this presumptious and ARROGANT behavior of a candidate pretending to be president.

Posted by: Anonymous | August 17, 2008 1:02 PM | Report abuse

Who won the week ??
Whoever won the Catholic vote..the deciding demographic of 2008.
No wonder MoveOn & Soros hates Christianity so much ..it's in their way of an autocratic / central planning police state

http://www.humanevents.com/article.php?id=27992

'BAMA


"He supports the late-term procedure known as partial-birth abortion, where the baby's skull is stabbed with scissors in the birth canal and the brains are sucked out to end its life swiftly and ease passage of the corpse into the pan."

Posted by: rtfanning | August 17, 2008 12:55 PM | Report abuse

McCain may have gained some right wingers, but he lost the middle, hands down.

Without the centrists and independents, McCain's future looks more bleak every day.

Does he really thnk the wingnuts were going to support Obama, so he needed to abandon his maverick myth to gain their support?

McCain's staff is playing by 20th Century rules. No matter how much our wingnut commentors feel enthralled by Bush's new mini-me, the damage it did to McCain's independent and centrist base is the real story here.

Now watch McCain start leaning back to the center, in a blatant chess-move that at least some of the wingnuts will recognize as being closely akin to Rove's "f*&^%$#g faith-based" derision.

Rove had to fool both the center and the wingnut factions, and then cage and cheat unscrupulously, to get Bush where he did.

McCain has only two choices now, and neither of them affords him a majority in November, Either he continues pandering to the right, and loses the middle, or he leans back to the center and loses the right.

How that might somehow be misconstrued as McCain "winning" is just one more case of media contrivance. McCain sold his maverick soul at Saddleback, and whether or not he gained the wingnuts is still questionable.

Curious isn't it, in that setting, McCain never once mentioned Jesus, but Obama was not afraid to.

Very interesting, that Saddleback crowd was a mix of flag worshipers and Jesus worshipers.

Is there any doubt as to which group was cheering McCain on?

Posted by: JEP | August 17, 2008 12:17 PM | Report abuse

McCain won the week, obviously. Last night Obama was stuttering, insecure in his answers. He needs a teleprompter to be a good speaker. Not good enough for president. At least McCain has a coherent discourse, you agree with him or not, and is more at ease with himself answering direct questions.

To Cilizza comment that Obama agreed to put Clinton in nomination: The woman got 1,900+ delegates, for goodness sake! Not counting the stolen (MI 4) and the taken out of Florida and MI. He is not crowned yet, even though the heads of the Dem Party have acted as if he were the dauphin since January, at least. By no means Obama is gracious or wise or anything like that. He has to let her be nominated at the convention, otherwise, what's the difference between this party that call itself democratic and any banana republic's official party in power for ever? Anyway, the Dem Party is divided and will be divided for a long time, after the coup that these guys did this year with the selection of the heir, instead of a honest and clean primary election. Shame on them.

Posted by: Floridagal | August 17, 2008 12:14 PM | Report abuse

wow

can't believe people on here who can't tell the difference between thinking...and a 30 second campaign soundbite of simpletion aggressiveness...
but then again...that's what got George w. Bush and Dick cheney elected ...twice...

and WHAT got us HERE.

Posted by: dl | August 17, 2008 10:49 AM | Report abuse

I don't miss them.
______________
Posted by: ET | August 17, 2008 9:42 AM

Mc Cain clearly won the week with his quick and decisive response to Russian agression. After listening to Obaman last night I STILL DON KNOW what his specific positions are and am getting annoyed by his continued prophetic grandiose orations on very specfic questions.

I miss THE CLINTONS.

Posted by: Vincent W. Foster | August 17, 2008 10:37 AM | Report abuse

McCain looked so Presidential Saturday night - he looked in command and the man we all want to be the Leader of Our Country and the Free World - the other countries do not get to vote for the Leader of the Free World and we should take that responsibility seriously.

Obama looked weak, so weak it was difficult to feel as though the two men were on the same point running for the same office.


McCain is a strong, tough leader who will face down the terrorists and any other adversary.


Obama is a weak pathetic little man who wants to start off by "cutting and running" and hoping that such a policy does not encourage terrorists and hostile states.


McCain proved Saturday night that he is the correct choice for this country by far and he is the Leader of the Free World.

.

Posted by: 37th&OStreet | August 17, 2008 10:24 AM | Report abuse

Scrivener, be ye Troll or Hillarian? And, what are you talking about????

Yes, BO lost the week but he won the primary; he'll be the nominee. The supers are not going to switch to Mrs. William J. Clinton ("enshrine the whine," her r-cards, and RFK a-cards have permanently discredited her candidacy for all time -- and she finished behind Mrs. Jean Harris in my veep long list, and behind Robert Mugabe on another's list) or Gore (he is not interested).

But I agree you don't win a presidency by going into a "four corners" Dean Smith stall. The very real obstacle of the r-card against BO dictates that BO take the offense soon. Once BO gets a veep as his wingman ("Born Fighting" Webb would have been a perfect BO veep, but lacked interest and has issues with women and AAs), you'll see his full court game. The good news: I heard BO did well (in what turned out to be a set-up against BO) at Rick Warren's faith debate.
___________________

Posted by: scrivener | August 16, 2008 12:08 PM
But Obama can unify the party -- and get his shot at the top job in 2016 -- if he's a good soldier and accepts the probable deal he's been offered by the Clintons, with Al Gore and John Kerry as their friendly enforcers: Take the vice presidency, Barack, and live to fight for POTUS another day.

Posted by: Broadway Joe | August 17, 2008 10:21 AM | Report abuse

Mccain gave his stump speech and never answered a question. Obama was warned about just giving stump speech answers and gave nice introspective answers. I don't get it. Mccain just sounded like an idiot ranting about Bin Laden and the gates of hell. WTF. Why did the interviewer let him get away with it?

----------
McCain looked so Presidential Saturday night - he looked in command and the man we all want to be the Leader of Our Country and the Free World - the other countries do not get to vote for the Leader of the Free World and we should take that responsibility seriously.

Obama looked weak, so weak it was difficult to feel as though the two men were on the same point running for the same office.


McCain is a strong, tough leader who will face down the terrorists and any other adversary.


Obama is a weak pathetic little man who wants to start off by "cutting and running" and hoping that such a policy does not encourage terrorists and hostile states.


McCain proved Saturday night that he is the correct choice for this country by far and he is the Leader of the Free World.

.


.

Posted by: 37th&OStreet | August 17, 2008 6:48 AM

Posted by: Anonymous | August 17, 2008 9:43 AM | Report abuse

Mc Cain clearly won the week with his quick and decisive response to Russian agression. After listening to Obaman last night I STILL DON KNOW what his specific positions are and am getting annoyed by his continued prophetic grandiose orations on very specfic questions.

I miss THE CLINTONS.

Posted by: ET | August 17, 2008 9:42 AM | Report abuse

(Forgot to sign before)
McCain won the week, not close. (Look, even Roger Federer loses a week once in a while; BO'll be back next week or the week after). BO's hard-to-fathom, foolish concessions to Mrs. William J. Clinton gave the week to Mac by default. BO's handing the entire convention over to HRC's "enshrine the whine" agenda (great line from Dowd) so she can turn it into a personal house party for her family (who are given two whole days to act out) and, of course, to Harriet Christian and the harpies is idiotic. Making matters worse is the agreement to include language in the platform suggesting BO won, not on merit, but through sexism (I guess that's about Chris Matthews's one 15 sec. rude HRC comment on one show) AND of course the roll call vote for HRC.
The roll call vote will be the ultimate platform for the harpies and the mentals to completely "go for it" in a final ugly spasm of "deranged narcissism" (great line from Jeff Toobin) and Harriet Christian-type hate blasts. With all the Hillarian drama, BO will get no media coverage and probably no real bump in the polls. I agree with the poster "Dog" that, one day, the Hillarians will be just a tiny lost tribe hunkered down in Borneo, just a memory relegated to a dusty history book. But that ain't now. Broder bloviates in the Post today that BO's concessions were a splendid idea -- that makes it "case closed." This week: Mac won.

Posted by: Broadway Joe | August 17, 2008 9:30 AM | Report abuse

McCain won the week, not close. (Look, even Roger Federer loses a week once in a while; BO'll be back next week or the week after). BO's hard-to-fathom, foolish concessions to Mrs. William J. Clinton gave the week to Mac by default. BO's handing the entire convention over to HRC's "enshrine the whine" agenda (great line from Dowd) so she can turn it into a personal house party for her family (who are given two whole days to act out) and, of course, to Harriet Christian and the harpies is idiotic. Making matters worse is the agreement to include language in the platform suggesting BO won, not on merit, but through sexism (I guess that's about Chris Matthews's one 15 sec. rude HRC comment on one show) AND of course the roll call vote for HRC.
The roll call vote will be the ultimate platform for the harpies and the mentals to completely "go for it" in a final ugly spasm of "deranged narcissism" (great line from Jeff Toobin) and Harriet Christian-type hate blasts. With all the Hillarian drama, BO will get no media coverage and probably no real bump in the polls. I agree with the poster "Dog" that, one day, the Hillarians will be just a tiny lost tribe hunkered down in Borneo, just a memory relegated to a dusty history book. But that ain't now. Broder bloviates in the Post today that BO's concessions were a splendid idea -- that makes it "case closed." This week: Mac won.

Posted by: Anonymous | August 17, 2008 9:28 AM | Report abuse

McCain clearly won the week. He looked strong on the Georgian crisis while Obama couldn't decide what kind of ice cream to buy. He performed very well at the Saddleback debate thereby solidifying his base. And all of the newest battleground state polls show him gaining on or overtaking Obama. Add this to his largest fundraising month to date and McCain supporters have to be feeling pretty good this week.

Posted by: Brenda | August 17, 2008 9:18 AM | Report abuse

From the Washington Posts's Archives,
(just so we're all clear on Sen. Biden's history- certainly it's old news, but I was shocked Dukakis ran an attack video):

"Joseph Biden's Plagiarism; Michael Dukakis's 'Attack Video' – 1988
Democratic presidential candidate Joseph R. Biden Jr., a U.S. senator from Delaware, was driven from the nomination battle after delivering, without attribution, passages from a speech by British Labor party leader Neil Kinnock. A barrage of subsidiary revelations by the press also contributed to Biden's withdrawal: a serious plagiarism incident involving Biden during his law school years; the senator's boastful exaggerations of his academic record at a New Hampshire campaign event; and the discovery of other quotations in Biden's speeches pilfered from past Democratic politicians.

The controversy became two frenzies in one when it was disclosed that the campaign of Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis had earlier secretly distributed to several news media outlets an "attack video" juxtaposing the Biden and Kinnock speeches and revealing Biden's word theft. The Dukakis campaign at first stonewalled and denied any part in the tape's distribution, but when the truth emerged Dukakis was forced to fire his campaign manager, John Sasso, and political director, Paul Tully – the two who had orchestrated the maneuver. Dukakis himself insisted he had no prior knowledge of their actions, and though wounded, his candidacy survived the incident."

Posted by: Scott | August 17, 2008 8:51 AM | Report abuse

Obama lost by not winning. Yes, it's that simple. The election is his to lose and, sad to say (since I support him), he's sliding if not losing.

Posted by: Bernie in VA | August 17, 2008 8:50 AM | Report abuse

Obama won the week. Anyone who successfully works out the convention schedule with the Clinton campaign, raises almost twice as much in donations as his opponent's "best month ever, and does it all while spending the week in Hawaii gets my vote.

Posted by: Steve O | August 17, 2008 8:25 AM | Report abuse

McCain looked so Presidential Saturday night - he looked in command and the man we all want to be the Leader of Our Country and the Free World - the other countries do not get to vote for the Leader of the Free World and we should take that responsibility seriously.

Obama looked weak, so weak it was difficult to feel as though the two men were on the same point running for the same office.


McCain is a strong, tough leader who will face down the terrorists and any other adversary.


Obama is a weak pathetic little man who wants to start off by "cutting and running" and hoping that such a policy does not encourage terrorists and hostile states.


McCain proved Saturday night that he is the correct choice for this country by far and he is the Leader of the Free World.

.


.

Posted by: 37th&OStreet | August 17, 2008 6:48 AM | Report abuse

McCain lost the week however Obama did not win. The Senator from AZ over played the Russian comments and stepped on the Republican President's toes. There is nothing that the USA can or should do in this conflict because its not yet known who is the bad guys. The Georgians attacked first. Still to be determined who we should be supporting. The pro independence side or a corrupt Georgia government.

The IL Senator stayed away this week. Perfect time to leave the stage. He needs to plan on when to surge. End of August before the convention is not the time to move. He is resting and not making any mistakes.

over all McCain loses week and Obama gets an incomplete.

Posted by: Rolf Jacobson | August 17, 2008 6:46 AM | Report abuse

As the money totals fly higher and higher, the thing that I feel the most is frustration at how many ads we'll be forced to see and hear, over and over and over and over and over and over. As someone who is particularly sensitive to repetition, it starts to drive me crazy fairly quickly. I get to where I want to vote against whoever is running so many ads, no matter what their message, whether they're positive or negative ads, and however I feel about the candidate otherwise. I know most other people don't get annoyed by repetitiveness as quickly as I do, but the way campaigns go nowadays, it would have to be difficult NOT to feel that way before election day. I wish they would use a higher percentage of the campaign donations for other purposes, such as get-out-the-vote programs and public events.

Posted by: Budikavlan | August 17, 2008 5:52 AM | Report abuse

The fix is also a rat Itsme like with edwards mum is the word until it's to late. This blob of a biased reporter has been helping Obama dupe Latinos for some time now. search The Fix's archives for posters who cite this damaging info on Obama's racism against Hispanics.

Posted by: Walter Hobbs | August 17, 2008 5:06 AM | Report abuse

Obama is a rat. If he wins this election it will be by fraud and falsery. All Americans are protected against race discimination right. Not according to Obama. Who doesn't know he thinks Hispanics or Latinos don't deserve this right? They currently don't have it in Illinois. No kidding there are Americans that can't asert race discrimination in Illinois and this Obama racist is trading on MLK. Sick!

Posted by: Itsme | August 17, 2008 3:25 AM | Report abuse

McCain went a long way tonight to solidify his base. He responded Presidentially to the same questions that Obama answered in a way that the President of the Harvard Law Review would be expected to answer. As the world faces a major crisis in Georgia, I’m even more confident that our country’s and my children’s future will be placed in the right hands after watching this forum. McCain won the week, and if he keeps it up, the election.

Posted by: Scott | August 17, 2008 2:37 AM | Report abuse

Why would they go to all this trouble to try to discredit scrivener if he didn't have something important to tell us? Not his political posts, necessarily, but his warnings about vigilante justice and radiation weaponry...

Maybe we should pay attention...

Posted by: WhyTheBlackOps? | August 17, 2008 1:55 AM | Report abuse

My this scrivener fellow must really be trying to tell us something important... or else why would they be going to all this trouble to try to discredit him?


Posted by: NoBlackOpsPleez | August 17, 2008 1:48 AM | Report abuse

Hey Scrivener,
Your brain over-analyzes while your finger lays off the pulse.Best of luck to you and yours.Thanks for the opportunity,Chris.

Posted by: HoosierDaddy | August 17, 2008 12:57 AM | Report abuse

RICK WARREN IS NO "FOO" (Friend of Obama)

Obama got snaked again.

He should have insisted that both he and McCain were questioned together, with an opportunity for rebuttal.

Warren conditioned Obama to think he was his "friend." Yet his demeanor was markedly different with McCain, more like being with a close friend rather than a house guest.

Obama's performance was honest and relaxed, but not politically advantageous for that crowd.

McCain was forceful and pandering at the same time. He knew what the audience wanted and gave it to them.

Obama seemed to play to his base, with his comments about the rule of law and habeus corpus. It was an honest and honorable performance, and he may have picked up support from some of the "social" evangelicals. But he probably had them already.

Bottom line: a net sum zero performance for both candidates. Each man held his own, but on a pander scale, give it to McCain.

By refusing to pander, Obama impressed his disillusioned base, something he hasn't done for a couple of months now.

I think he's gotten the message about sticking to principles. But is it too late?

Posted by: scrivener | August 16, 2008 9:48 PM | Report abuse

"Who won the week?" A stupid question put forth in lieu of actual reporting.

The RNC clear losers for suggesting that someone taking a vacation in Hawaii -- as millions of real Americans, hardworking Americans do all the time -- is elitist. The McCain campaign loses for offering the "blistering" criticism that while at the beach, a beachgoer should not take his shirt off. The McCain campaign loses again for their over-the-top fake President McCain sending fake envoys Graham and Lieberman to Georgia (and not the one with Atlanta as it capital) and fouling the messaging of a sitting President of his own party. The McCain camp loses again for continuing to put out false advertising -- especially during the Olympics. They lose again for just being a candidate with infidelity in their past when the Edwards story breaks and grows a pair of sturdy legs. They lose more when the list of GOP "names" -- especially Senators -- who are not attending the RNC bash Minneapolis continues growing. They lose a bit more when the whole Sturgis/Cindy as Miss Buffalo Chip hits the conservative Christian community as not the kind of place you want to offer up your wife as, well, bait. They lose some more with the whole "We are all Georgians" thing, and sleazeball connections between campaign staffer/lobbyist to Georgia. Oh, and did I mention DHL? Sure it brought jobs in at the start, but like all brilliant ideas hatched with little thought, this one has backfired and is costing the community jobs. They blew a tire when they suggested to the base that McCain might choose a pro-choice veep and that set off a firestorm. And now this man of little faith and questionable morals is stepping into roundhouse of Rick Warren's church.

Obama meanwhile raised $51 million, took his wife and kids on vacation, lowered the amount of media coverage, showed off his incredible bod, quietly visited Pearl Harbor, issued a forceful but low-key and appropriate statement on Georgia, kicked Jerome Corsi in the nuts with a blistering 41-page point-by-point rebuttal to the Mary Matalin published birdcage liner.

Really Chris, did you need to ask? Obama. Hands down. Game, set and match.

Posted by: Anonymous | August 16, 2008 7:59 PM | Report abuse

WHAT IS "MIISOLUTIONS.NET" AND WHY ARE MY POSTS TO "THE FIX" BEING RE-DIRECTED THERE?


Fixistas:

I mentioned that when I post to Chris' site, my taskbar often reveals that data is being sent to "miisolutions.net." It happened when my most recent post was transmitted four times, instead of the one time that I had intended.

I just did a Google search. Multiple IP addresses use that web address as "mirror sites," with a main hub in Asburn, VA.

Is "miisolutions.net" a contractor of WaPo? If not, who are they, and why are my posts being directed to a "mirror site"?

If anyone else has seen "miisolutions.net" in their task bars when posting to Chris' blog, please let other Fix readers know by posting a message here.

If this isn't a WaPo contractor, there may be something going on that has privacy rights ramifications. That is an unproven thesis that bears looking into.

I would be interested to hear what WaPo's webmaster has to say. Since electronic communications are sometimes problematic, perhaps someone inside WaPo who is reading this can ask him/her in person. Thanks.

Posted by: scrivener | August 16, 2008 7:37 PM | Report abuse

Got my first TWO invitations (both today) to "Joebama" Parties...lol

So I have a feeling this past week is a wash...partly because real issues with just how bad of a situation we have gotten in with our military...just came slamming us back in the face.

Posted by: dl | August 16, 2008 7:01 PM | Report abuse

Scrivener did not purposely post the above post four times.

I got a full-screen message on my computer that the transmission was "interrupted while loading" and was instructed to hit "resend the post data." This happened several times, and I was under the impression that the transmission did not go through because that's what the full-screen message said.

Each time I tried to post, I got a message in my taskbar that data was being sent to "miisolutions.net."

I have seen this message in my task bar frequently, the same "miisolutions.net" being sent my data.

I believe someone or some entity may be doing some "remote computing" here. I can only speculate as to the possible reasons. Anyone who's interested can read my postings at nowpublic.com/scrivener, which I believe have garnered some undesired attention from certain interests who would rather than I write about something else.

Chris' blog, I believe, is infested with paid disinformation trolls who have attempted to embarrass and discredit many posters here, certainly not just this writer.

I can't say that's what happened here. But it is a possibility I cannot discount.

Anyone else experiencing gremlins like this? Please let me know somehow.

Posted by: scrivener | August 16, 2008 6:59 PM | Report abuse

All disasters are different. Some are sudden catastrophes: a bridge collapse, an earthquake, or the capsizing of a ferryboat. One moment everything is fine, the next, disaster. Other disasters seem to occur in slow motion: the Titanic scaping along the iceberg, the slow leak that fatally undermines a dam, or the gradual destruction of an environment through pollution.

John McCain suffered three slow motion disasters this past week, events that didn't look that bad as they happened, but in retrospect will hurt or even wreck his campaign for the presidency.

1. The South Ossetian-Georgia War

This is the "quietest" of the disasters to befall John McCain this week. Why do I say "quiet"? Because most mainstream political commentators didn't fully realize the implications of this short disastrous war. Some rather foolishly chalked this up as a victory for John McCain. Nothing could be further from the truth. The war Georgia started and so spectacularly lost points up a number of fatal flaws in McCain's foreign policy. First, McCain has been a champion of Georgia and its president, Mikheil Saakashvili in particular, even nominating Saakashvili for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2005. Saakashvili was McCain's boy and his policy was almost certainly signed off on by McCain. Saakashvili has since been burning up the telephone lines to McCain looking for help McCain can't give.

These calls for help point to the second problem McCain has in Georgia: his foreign-policy-by-lobbyist. Over the last seven years we have seen the Republican Party under George W. Bush sell out to lobbyists in nearly every way possible. McCain has taken it a step further, conducting his foreign policy according to whichever country is the highest bidder to McCain's lobbyist/adviser Randy Scheunemann. Scheunemann has been taking money from Georgia while advising John McCain on foreign policy in general and Georgia in particular. This is a huge conflict of interests.

Finally, McCain's actions in regard to Georgia have crossed the "presumptious" barrier and left it far behind. McCain and his advisers criticized Barack Obama for giving a speech in Berlin during his recent visit, calling such a speech "presumptious" because Obama was not yet president. How much more presumptious is it then for McCain to be running his own foreign policy in Georgia? President Bush fumbled for days, then finally dispatched Condi Rice to Georgia. McCain grew impatient with Bush and dispatched his own diplomatic team to Georgia! Since when do Senators conduct the foreign policy of the United States independent of the executive branch?

McCain's complicity in Georgia's preparation for war, his corrupt conflicts of interests with Randy Scheunemann, and his presumptious conduct of an independent foreign policy will all come back to haunt him once the mainstream media catches up.

2. John Edwards infidelity scandal / John McCain infidelity scandal

This disaster has been waiting in John McCain's background, waiting for a triggering event. The revelation of John Edwards' infidelity was precisely the trigger needed. Seemingly John Edwards' character failure should have nothing to do with John McCain. But the right wing press and radio talkshows in particular could not resist pounding the hated Edwards for his infidelity and complete lack of class. The right wingers had a field day criticizing the scumbag politiciain who cheated on his wife while she suffered a terrible health crisis. There's only one problem: the Republican candidate for president is a scumbag politician who cheated on his wife while she suffered a terrible health crisis. Then he took it a step further and ditched his disabled wife for a younger, prettier, wealthier woman that he had carried on an affair with for several months while still married to his disabled wife.

True, all of this had happened some time ago. Many had never heard of it, many more had forgotten it, and his fans in the mainstream press had given him a pass for it. But once upon a time John McCain was put to the supreme test as a husband, and he emerged a failure. All of this was in the past of course, and seemed forgotten if not forgiven. Until Republican talk radio and Fox News decided to devote an entire week to covering this story. Then the right wing swung the door wide open, and more and more commentators have begun to talk about John McCain's infidelity. This story will come back to haunt John McCain long after we have forgotten John Edwards.

3. The Colorado-New Mexico water blunder

The formula for sharing water in seven western states (Arizona, Nevada, California, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, and New Mexico) was decided in 1922. Now John McCain wants to throw out that agreement and renegotiate it. McCain wants Arizona, Nevada, and California and Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, and New Mexico to get less. This is going to cost McCain bigtime. Two of the states John McCain wants to steal water from are also key swing states: Colorado and New Mexico. Coloradans in particular are reacting angrily to McCain's proposal to take their water. Here's the Denver Post:
Memo to: John McCain.

From: Five million thirst-crazed Coloradans.

Subject: Forget about winning our nine electoral votes next November. We don't vote for water rustlers in this state; we tar and feather them!

Yes, fellow citizens of the state whose official motto is "Whiskey is for drinking, water is for fighting," John McCain has thunk the unthinkable — and proposed renegotiating the 1922 Colorado River Compact.[1]
And then to drive the point home:
As a senator, McCain has long represented a state, Arizona, that would love to steal Colorado's water. But now, he wants our votes. Apparently, nobody bothered to brief the candidate who Paris Hilton called "that wrinkly, white-haired guy" that stealing Colorado's water to benefit Arizona, California and Nevada isn't as popular an idea in Colorado as it is in Arizona, California and Nevada.[2]
Oh, that's gonna leave a mark, especially the Paris Hilton bit. Want to know who's really ticked off? The Republican candidate for Colorado's U.S. Senate seat, Bob Schaffer:
"Over my cold, dead, political carcass," Republican U.S. Senate candidate Bob Schaffer said.

"The compact is the only protection Colorado has from several more politically powerful downstream states," Schaffer added. "Opening it for renegotiation would be the equivalent of a lamb discussing with a pack of wolves what should be on the dinner menu."[3]
That's what the Republican said; you can imagine what the Democrats are saying. Before McCain opened his mouth, Colorado was looking like a swing state. Now, after John McCain revealed his plan to steal Colorado's water a redistribute it, it's very doubtful he can carry the state. New Mexico previously had a Democratic tilt to it, and McCain's water grab plan will probably solidify Obama hold over this state. McCain can't afford to give up swing states, but with his water grab plan he threw away two of them in one fell swoop.

So to sum up, not only did John McCain not "win the week," as some paid pundits have said, this week actually saw McCain's campaign spring a number of leaks that will sink it by November.

Thanks and a hat tip to mcjoan at Daily Kos for the Colorado water story.

Posted by: The Richmond Democrat | August 16, 2008 6:55 PM | Report abuse

NEW WEAPON AGAINST OBAMA: HIS EMBRACE BY SOME POWERFUL AGENTS OF THE "MILITARY-INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX"?

• Will Hill and Bill Reprise Ike's Farewell Address Warnings?


There's a theory going around that Obama's pliability now makes him a favorite of neo-cons in both parties.

The thinking is that if he can't hold firm to his stated positions and principles, the stances that narrowly won him the primary contest, he can be groomed, shaped and molded into the power elite's perfect Oval Office pawn.

It is possible that Obama-malleability already has earned him unexpected support among leaders of the defense, nuclear power, and telecommunications industries.

The reasons: His openness to nuclear power as a state legislator; his flip-flop on gun control legislation; and his reveral on FISA and telecom immunity.

For some of these constituencies, Obama could be the preferred candidate over McCain, who, as a warrior himself, has a greater empathy than Obama for the views expressed in Eisenhower's farewell address.

Ike warned that the "military-industrial complex" poses grave dangers to our democracy if left unchecked to pursue its agenda.

If this view resonates among Obama's now-disillusioned base of young, left-leaning Democrats, it could doom his candidacy...

...epsecially if Hillary and Bill wisely echo and amplify Eisenhower's warnings in their convention addresses.

Posted by: scrivener | August 16, 2008 6:43 PM | Report abuse

NEW WEAPON AGAINST OBAMA: HIS EMBRACE BY SOME POWERFUL AGENTS OF THE "MILITARY-INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX"?

• Will Hill and Bill Reprise Ike's Farewell Address Warnings?


There's a theory going around that Obama's pliability now makes him a favorite of neo-cons in both parties.

The thinking is that if he can't hold firm to his stated positions and principles, the stances that narrowly won him the primary contest, he can be groomed, shaped and molded into the power elite's perfect Oval Office pawn.

It is possible that Obama-malleability already has earned him unexpected support among leaders of the defense, nuclear power, and telecommunications industries.

The reasons: His openness to nuclear power as a state legislator; his flip-flop on gun control legislation; and his reveral on FISA and telecom immunity.

For some of these constituencies, Obama could be the preferred candidate over McCain, who, as a warrior himself, has a greater empathy than Obama for the views expressed in Eisenhower's farewell address.

Ike warned that the "military-industrial complex" poses grave dangers to our democracy if left unchecked to pursue its agenda.

If this view resonates among Obama's now-disillusioned base of young, left-leaning Democrats, it could doom his candidacy...

...epsecially if Hillary and Bill wisely echo and amplify Eisenhower's warnings in their convention addresses.

Posted by: scrivener | August 16, 2008 6:33 PM | Report abuse

NEW WEAPON AGAINST OBAMA: HIS EMBRACE BY SOME POWERFUL AGENTS OF THE "MILITARY-INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX"?

• Will Hill and Bill Reprise Ike's Farewell Address Warnings?


There's a theory going around that Obama's pliability now makes him a favorite of neo-cons in both parties.

The thinking is that if he can't hold firm to his stated positions and principles, the stances that narrowly won him the primary contest, he can be groomed, shaped and molded into the power elite's perfect Oval Office pawn.

It is possible that Obama-malleability already has earned him unexpected support among leaders of the defense, nuclear power, and telecommunications industries.

The reasons: His openness to nuclear power as a state legislator; his flip-flop on gun control legislation; and his reveral on FISA and telecom immunity.

For some of these constituencies, Obama could be the preferred candidate over McCain, who, as a warrior himself, has a greater empathy than Obama for the views expressed in Eisenhower's farewell address.

Ike warned that the "military-industrial complex" poses grave dangers to our democracy if left unchecked to pursue its agenda.

If this view resonates among Obama's now-disillusioned base of young, left-leaning Democrats, it could doom his candidacy...

...epsecially if Hillary and Bill wisely echo and amplify Eisenhower's warnings in their convention addresses.

Posted by: scrivener | August 16, 2008 6:33 PM | Report abuse

NEW WEAPON AGAINST OBAMA: HIS EMBRACE BY SOME POWERFUL AGENTS OF THE "MILITARY-INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX"?

• Will Hill and Bill Reprise Ike's Farewell Address Warnings?


There's a theory going around that Obama's pliability now makes him a favorite of neo-cons in both parties.

The thinking is that if he can't hold firm to his stated positions and principles, the stances that narrowly won him the primary contest, he can be groomed, shaped and molded into the power elite's perfect Oval Office pawn.

It is possible that Obama-malleability already has earned him unexpected support among leaders of the defense, nuclear power, and telecommunications industries.

The reasons: His openness to nuclear power as a state legislator; his flip-flop on gun control legislation; and his reveral on FISA and telecom immunity.

For some of these constituencies, Obama could be the preferred candidate over McCain, who, as a warrior himself, has a greater empathy than Obama for the views expressed in Eisenhower's farewell address.

Ike warned that the "military-industrial complex" poses grave dangers to our democracy if left unchecked to pursue its agenda.

If this view resonates among Obama's now-disillusioned base of young, left-leaning Democrats, it could doom his candidacy...

...epsecially if Hillary and Bill wisely echo and amplify Eisenhower's warnings in their convention addresses.

Posted by: scrivener | August 16, 2008 6:29 PM | Report abuse

You sock puppet PUMA losers crack me up.

Hillary lost because she ran a terrible camapaign, she captained one of the worst collapses in political history.
It's over, finished, done, finito: GET OVER IT!

And as far as old man Mr McGoo goes, he can't hardly remember his name half the time let alone what his policies might be from day to day without the help of his Rovebot campaign flunkies and Turncoat Joe Liebertoad. The concern trolls on here would be laughable if they weren't so pathetic.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Oot9IbQxrI


-------------------------------


But right now, she holds the cards. Will she play her hand? And will Gore have the guts and the wisdom to let himself be anointed for the good of the party? Stay tuned.Either way, Obama could be toast by convention eve.

Posted by: Anonymous | August 16, 2008 5:38 PM

Posted by: astral99 | August 16, 2008 6:00 PM | Report abuse

That was scriv at 5:38 p.m. Must have missed the box.

Posted by: scrivener | August 16, 2008 5:40 PM | Report abuse

DexterM:

Are you channeling me?

Muy bueno, caballero.

Except I skew Dem and want Hillary to toss to Gore. If she covertly buys into that scenario and lets it be known, it will happen.

If she still thinks the convention will nominate her in the end, she is delusional (unless she and Bill get a quickie divorce so she can finally rid herself of his baggage and free him up to pursue his agenda).

But right now, she holds the cards. Will she play her hand? And will Gore have the guts and the wisdom to let himself be anointed for the good of the party? Stay tuned.

Either way, Obama could be toast by convention eve.


BUT WILL THE ELECTION EVEN MATTER? Not when government-supported "vigilante injustice" squads are targeting Americans outside of the bounds of the law:
http://www.nowpublic.com/world/get-political-vic-livingston-opinion-expose-state-supported-vigilante-squads-doing-domestic-terrorism

Posted by: Anonymous | August 16, 2008 5:38 PM | Report abuse

Most will say that McCain won the week. Until the old man began his usual weakend vacation, he had campaigned vigorously, while Obama was relatively quiet.

But McCain may well have overplayed his hand regarding the Georgia incursion by Russia, stepping forward uninvited to take on a big-stick role as acting President reminiscent of Alexander Haig's "I'm in charge here" assertion from the Nixon White House. McCain made a strong impression that he longs for a return to the years of Vietnam informed by a bifurcated world that is fixated by a Manichean mind. (To NPR he denied a wish to reprise the Cold War while asserting repeatedly that if you're not part of the solution you're part of the problem.)

No doubt the headstrong testiness will appeal immediately to many, but thoughtful persons have until November to ponder whether they want to gamble our future and that of our offspring with a leader so erratic and unstable as yesterday's man, a man in his dotage increasingly prone to anecdotage.

Posted by: First Mouse | August 16, 2008 4:25 PM | Report abuse

Sadly, McCain wins two weeks running and it may be over for Obama.

Once Obama's likely to pick Biden for VP and McCain knows that Obama's tremendous approval around the world is a big minus for Obama in the US, plus the Democratic Convention will feature every Blue Dog they can find, you can't forget about it.

McCain has completely taken control of the debate and has gotten Obama so far off his strengths it's pathetic.

American voters will get a choice of continuing the Bush years with Obama or something much worse with McCain.

I think it's hilarious really, because it's not my problem. I'd be furious if I were a Democrat. I'd be thrilled if I were a Republican. They are arguing over who's a bigger hawk now. Does Obama have a chance in that scenario?

The funny thing about it is that the more hawkish and compliant Obama acts, the weaker he looks and the more male votes he loses.

If he had nailed his colors to the mast and said "I'm a Democrat" he might have had a chance even at a landslide. He's not playing to the middle anymore. He zoomed past middle in July. He's playing to the right. Let's see how it works for him.

My guess is if Obama doesn't do something soon that's different, McCain could make over 300 electoral votes. The Democratic Party's fraidy-cats are in the process of ruining the career of its brightest star.

Obama's not going to beat Clinton in 2012 for the nomination. He won't be able to beat Feingold or Wyden for that matter. He'll return to the Senate having alienated everybody in the party north of Virginia, in Illinois and on the West coast.

I see him as the president of Harvard University sometime in 2011.

But these are his choices I assume. I wish him luck. McCain won't be my president.

Posted by: DexterManley | August 16, 2008 4:11 PM | Report abuse

Obama wins this week and every week.McSenile self-destructs this week and every week.Should McWipe win,count the minutes to Armageddon.Your redemption draws nigh.

Posted by: HoosierDaddy | August 16, 2008 3:39 PM | Report abuse

I still believe there's at least a 50/50 chance that the Republican Party dumps McCain before this fall and replaces him with a better candidate.
As a Democrat, I hope they don't do it because the Dems couldn't ask for a worse candidate than Grampy McBush to run against. With McBush as the Repub candidate, the Dems win every week, hands down.


McBush - He's Not Old, He's Ancient!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HG_RV6EQFSg

Posted by: Johnny Rotten | August 16, 2008 3:10 PM | Report abuse

It's a sad day in American journalism when two fake news guys (Stewart and Colbert) do a better job of telling the truth than our real media people do.


Jon Stewart: I've got as much authority as McCain in the Georgia situation
-
http://www.crooksandliars.com/2008/08/15/jon-stewart-ive-got-as-much-authority-as-mccain-in-the-georgia-situation/
-

Posted by: JE | August 16, 2008 2:51 PM | Report abuse

On the face of it the match was probably about even. McCain got a little more media time, only to squander it by saying the President needed to be supported on Georgia. And he only got that much attention because Barack wasn't campaigning. BUT, Obama got what HE wanted. HRC's people were opposed to the idea but Obama wanted her front and center at the convention. While the polls show things deadlocked, that's a reflection of our arrival at the "deadest" point in the campaign. Call this the downshifting-for-tune-up-phase while the country is focused on Michael Phelps et al and look for overdrive--and some kind of actual RACE that would make 'who won the week?' a lot more interesting.

Posted by: dch | August 16, 2008 2:41 PM | Report abuse

I'm not sure which thread ought to get this point, so the most recently updated gets chosen.

Heard your comments on why Biden might be a good VP pick, but there is one major fallacy in your reasoning:

The Blue Collar vote might be best broken into four sub groups: Dedicated Dems, Red neck blue collar dems, non political blue collar, and conservative blue collar.

Until Obama got his campaign train rolling, Hillary was the obvious candidate of the traditional democrats. so in the big states with big blue collar blocs, she should have done well against Obama, because she carries the traditional dems, the red neck dems, and neither does too well among the conservative blue collar. Barack made his bones by bringing in as many otherwise nonpolitical blue collar as he did.

To assume the because he didn't beat Hillary for the blue collar vote is the same as he won't beat McCain for it is silly. He brings his own bloc of blue collar, (we hope. They have to want him as president enough to go vote one more time) and there is no reason to expect the regular Democratic voting blue collar block to abandon the party.

So the question is how red neck are the red necks, considering there are now so many red necks with enough black friends that that won't really matter come election day.

Biden probably doesn't bring very much to the campaign to woo those blue collar voters, and doesn't bring much to leverage the conservatives. He also doesn't even bring his own states, counting Pennsylvania as his state, that Obama doesn't already have. He does make the Dems contest another Senate seat when they win.

The ideal candidate soothes the red neck Dems, and splits a few of the conservative blue collar voters. Bayh certainly DOES do that, but he is also a contested Senate seat if he wins. were he not in the Senate now he would be the nearly perfect ticket balancer.

It is among Barack's core constituency, from the early days, that the real hint as to whom the Dems should look for VP: the more formerly non political voters the party draws in, the more voters click, twist, mark, or poke Democrats for the Executive, the better, because having pulled the trigger once, they are now confromted with all those other targets. The ones who are voting because they are mad will probably decide that that R beside those names is what they are mad at. Mad non political voters probably don't much ticket split. If the VP reinforces BHO's ability to bring out the left out, (R)'s are an endangered species. If Bob Barr gets the po'd evangelical vote, (R)'s may do a lot of accepting the bronze this time around.

But the fact that BHO didn't beat HRC means almost nothing when both of them speak the same words, with the same conviction, in almost the same tone and timbre of voice.

Hillary and every other candidate who wants his minute of glory ought to get nominated at the convention. They ought to get their proper collection of delegates votes. When Barack has a first round majority, THEN Hillary ought to climb up on the stage and move unanimous nomination by acclimation. (Or whatever wretched assemblage of mostly trite homonyms her speech writers decide best fits the wretched excess verbiage of the moment)

Posted by: ceflynline@msn.com | August 16, 2008 2:37 PM | Report abuse

“What's wrong with this picture?  Everyone hates George W. Bush.  Everyone wants change.  Over 65% of the American people agree the nation is headed in the wrong direction.  One candidate is brilliant, inspiring, charismatic and represents change.  The other is aging, inarticulate, incoherent and stands for the status quo.  The first has been running a brilliant campaign, the other a campaign in virtual chaos.  Each day one candidate offers serious solutions for significant problems, while the other makes a fool of himself.  Yet the polls say, "McCain is gaining ground" and "Obama is losing ground."  One national poll even has them running neck and neck or shows John McCain ahead of Barack Obama.   Do any of us stop to think that these poll results cannot possibly be correct? ”

Preposterous Polls And Corrupt Campaigns
http://www.opednews.com/articles/Preposterous-Polls-and-Cor-by-Jim-Fetzer-080813-983.html

Posted by: Kristin2 | August 16, 2008 2:21 PM | Report abuse

Putin won the week. Bush lost the week. USA lost the week. It is amusing to see the lengths Obama and McCain; the Democrat Party and the Republic Party; Move On and others go - the vast amounts of money spent - to see which man and which party presides over the decline of the American Empire.

Posted by: Doug C | August 16, 2008 2:03 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: BAN RADIATION WEAPONRY | August 16, 2008 2:03 PM | Report abuse

Elvis died this day in 1977.

Who was HIS favorite president?

http://politicalhumor.about.com/library/images/blpic-nixonelvis.htm

Posted by: Memphis Mafia/political wing | August 16, 2008 2:00 PM | Report abuse

Obama won the week. McLame strutted around opining about Georgia, who no one cares about. His agreement to let Hillary be nominated was good. His doubling McLame's fundraising bodes well for the rest of the campaign's fundraising, which should only accelerate once the convention fans the Democrats flames. I can't wait for Obama to stand next to that little old man in the debates and make him look like the person he is. Tired and very, very old.

Posted by: DougL | August 16, 2008 1:46 PM | Report abuse

"Money can't buy you love," the lads sang.

The pollsters in the battleground states aren't feeling the love for Obama.

The fact that McCain is neck-and-neck proves the point: Money isn't buying this election.

But if Obama ends up as the nominee's VP, it's my understanding that his money can be spent on the Dem campaign. So it's all good, all working according to the script (maybe).

Posted by: scrivener | August 16, 2008 12:49 PM | Report abuse

Your update says it all: 51 to 27. In politics as sport, Obama won a blowout with the starting quarterback on the bench.

Posted by: pedestrian | August 16, 2008 12:42 PM | Report abuse

BETH IN VA IS MISTAKEN

The only places my roll call epistle was posted by me were: here (where it appeared first, as usual); later, on my own blog site; and because it was relevant, on Dave Broder's "Trail" blog.

If you saw it anyplace else, it is because some others, not I, thought it deserved wider circulation.

Thanks for the 4-1-1, though!


Scriv

Posted by: scrivener | August 16, 2008 12:42 PM | Report abuse

scrivener has been pasting this same comment in nearly every political blog I've visited this week. Is this what they call astroturfing?

Anyway, it's irritating, and at the risk of prompting more scrivenor posts, I'm asking others to just ignore them. It will eat up the entire thread--that's the point with these comments. That's the essence of trollhood.

Posted by: Beth in VA | August 16, 2008 12:13 PM | Report abuse

McCain Rules Obama is fading.

Edwards lost the week. That much is clear.

The question still remains did Hillary's people sink Edwards to clear him out of there, or did Obama's people do this??? I believe that the Edwards story hurt Obama because it confirms that all democrats are lying cheating taxing affirmative action scumbags.

So I really can't believe that the Obama people would have a motive to get this story out on Edwards.

It appears that Hillary is going to make her move - she needs to switch about a hundred delegates her way - ALL THE DELEGATES CAN SWITCH BEFORE THE FIRST VOTE THAT IS TED KENNEDY'S RULE FROM THE 80s - Hillary probably has a bunch of deals cut already.

.

Posted by: Anonymous | August 16, 2008 12:11 PM | Report abuse

HILLARY'S TROJAN HORSE ROLL CALL ANYTHING BUT 'SYMBOLIC'

• Supers will not bet on one who's coming up lame; Al Gore in the stretch?


The mainstream media has spoken: the New York Times and the Washington Post, in news articles and in commentary, already have labeled as "symbolic" Hillary Clinton's well-played gambit to have her name placed in nomination at the Democratic convention in Denver (despite her feigned opposition to the "Hillary Roll Call" trojan-horse strategy).

"Purely symbolic"? Just "emblematic" of a historic but failed campaign, as another MSM outlet declared?

Let's place a gentleman's bet. Scriv says Hillary's got the 200 or so defections she needs to ensure that Obama is not nominated on the first ballot.

If there is an attempt to make "her" roll call purely symbolic, and not binding, such a move would reek of sexism, and probably would be discriminatory and illegal to boot. If Obama tries to invalidate Hillary's vote tally, perhaps Hillary would elect to take the DNC and his campaign to federal court.

"PU-MA! PU-MA!" (That's the grassroots pro-Hillarian group, "Party Unity My Ass," for Hillaryworld uninitiates).

No, we are wagering that Obama had no other choice but to cave on the Hillary roll call. And we're going out on the limb to say that Obama may even know that he's been checkmated. If he doesn't win on the first ballot, he is officially declared a political eunuch. And then Hillary can pledge her delegates to a third candidate, such as Al Gore, who would go on to win the nomination and then promptly name Obama as his veepee in a swift and effective unification move.

And the hostile takeover of the DNC is reversed in a cunningly executed "coup de parte." The Clintons know how to fight and win, unlike the compromising, combat-averse Obama. His hubris is unearned.

In fact, this script already may have been written, and signed off on, by Obama; perhaps that's why he didn't cut short his vacation so he could look more "presidential" and in command during a critical news week. Maybe he knows something the pundits have yet to figure out.

McCain clearly won the week by showing up, looking very much like the candidate who's ready to lead -- and next week's tracking polls will tell the tale.

What has been characterized by Obama apologists as a "magnanimous" gesture, we would call back-to-the-wall capitulation. Remember, Obama didn't want to do this. Just a week or so ago, he rejected the "catharsis" of a Hillary roll call. But then he realized that he would be perceived as anti-democratic -- Obamanistic, you might say -- if he fought the vote.

Let's repeat the prognostication once again: Obama will not get the presidential nomination because the supers know full well that he cannot win the general. Look at those battleground state polls over at RealClearPolitics.com. It's dead-even at a time when the Democrat should be pulling away.

If the Dem superdelegates let Obama get the nomination, they are ceding the general election to the GOP. They cannot do it. And Obama's issue vacillations and his unwillingness to fully engage demonstrate why he does not deserve the nomination.

But Obama can unify the party -- and get his shot at the top job in 2016 -- if he's a good soldier and accepts the probable deal he's been offered by the Clintons, with Al Gore and John Kerry as their friendly enforcers: Take the vice presidency, Barack, and live to fight for POTUS another day.

To quote again from my favorite poet du jour, the unknown Larry Eisenberg, whose Ode to Obamanistic Capitulation I discovered while reading a "comments" section on the New York Times web site:


Barack Obama, to appease,
May soon find he’s shorn of fleece,
Bought Ms. Hill’ry’s pig-in-poke,
Put his neck right in her yoke!


BUT WILL THE ELECTION EVEN MATTER? Not when government-supported "vigilante injustice" squads are targeting American citizens outside of the bounds of the law:
http://www.nowpublic.com/world/get-political-vic-livingston-opinion-expose-state-supported-vigilante-squads-doing-domestic-terrorism

Posted by: scrivener | August 16, 2008 12:08 PM | Report abuse

1. McCain's pretending to be President regarding the Georgian situation, including sending embassies into the country was a BIG MINUS. 2. McCain's negative attack ads continue to be a reversal of his "clean campaign" pledge, by he and Cindy--BIG MINUS. 3. McCain appears to have lost control of his campaign favoring a Rovian style campaign--BIG MINUS 4.NRunning negative ads during Olympic games--MINUS 5. Raising $21M in July a BIG PLUS.

1. Obama wise to take time away from the campaign trail, putting family in a respectable level--BIG PLUS 2. Reducing Clinton/convention party unity issue--BIG PLUS 3. Properly responding to Georgian situation with no interference to the White House responsibility--BIG PLUS. 4. DNC capturing news coverage with convention speaker news releases--PLUS 5. Positive ads during Olympic Games--PLUS 6. Campaign 41 page response to Corsi book--BIG PLUS 7. Still weak on strong responses to McCain gaffes--BIG MINUS

Posted by: Lou R | August 16, 2008 12:07 PM | Report abuse

Obama won, every week McCain speaks he loses. Its funny that the GOP supporters want us to read a fictionalized book by a GOP hack. Just remember your boy Dubya said he saw into Putins sole, this is their version of foreign policy, something McCain has no clue how to do...

Posted by: American First | August 16, 2008 12:07 PM | Report abuse

Mccain seemed to win the week but then once again he opened him mouth one too many times and reaffirmed he is little more then a fool. I loved the speech he gave that sounded so good till it was revealed about one third of it was word for word from the internet site Wikipedia. In reality, in his attempt to sound scholarly he proved again he didn't even know what he was talking about.

Posted by: Anonymous | August 16, 2008 12:01 PM | Report abuse

Russsia's invasion into Georgia has been a wake up call for Europe and so it should be for the USA.
Let us never forget that Putin used to be the head of the KGB and we have not been paying enough attention to the shift in russian politics.
Nobody wants war but one does have to realize that we do live in an unstable world and America has to stand strong as a country with strong leadership.
Obama does not fit that role , we can not afford a President with training wheels..!!

Posted by: Paulina | August 16, 2008 11:58 AM | Report abuse

I read the book, standing at the book store. It is written to a very low level easy reading to say the least. There is nothing new or researched in the book at all. Everything in the book you have read right here and much of the quotes he attributes to blogs and takes no responsibility for. He like you use phrases like, "It has long been believed" and "Many say" or "Many believe". " Many question" all the kinds of things that does not require any personable responsibility to what he has written. He could himself dismiss the whole book by just saying "Well that is what I have heard, if it is not true then so be it".

------------

McCain definitely won the week!
Just look at the most recent polls, which are pretty much a dead heat.
I am so grateful that Americans are waking up and realizing what a joke Obama is.
Read the book OBAMA NATION!!!!!!
So please, Americans, pick a real leader.

McCain '08
Posted by: Mindscape | August 16, 2008 10:51 AM

Posted by: Anonymous | August 16, 2008 11:55 AM | Report abuse

McCain’s warmongering with Russian and for the Georgians (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/08/14/AR2008081401360.html?hpid=topnews) against the best interest of the US, not to mention sending his only personal entourage (Liberman and Graham) to Georgia indicate to me that McCain lost the week and Obama won.

Posted by: marymataisz | August 16, 2008 11:23 AM | Report abuse

McCain definitely won the week!
Just look at the most recent polls, which are pretty much a dead heat.
I am so grateful that Americans are waking up and realizing what a joke Obama is.
Read the book OBAMA NATION!!!!!!
So please, Americans, pick a real leader.

McCain '08

Posted by: Mindscape | August 16, 2008 10:51 AM | Report abuse

McCain won the week because he got it right about the situation overseas and reminded everyone of his experience in foreign policy matters compared to Obama. This is reminiscent of the 3:00 am political ad; however, it was a part of the world no one in the USA pays much attention too so in that instance its not the same. I would say McCain got it right since both Obama and Bush eventually came to his position. It’s ironic that both Bush and Obama are sharing similar foreign policy positions. If the election comes down to foreign policy (I do not think it will) McCain will win unless the foreign policy issue is Iraq.

I would only agree with MarkinAustin in that if Obama was doing what McCain is doing (sending over a delegation to Georgia, calling the president of Georgia, etc.) he would be lambasting him for interfering with State Department affairs. However, I think given the situation (election in Nov. and current crisis) as it stand McCain is not doing something extraordinary but rather following some precedence. Actually it might help Obama if he prepared himself similar to McCain, but then again it might remind everyone of his lack of experience (tough call).

The problem I see for McCain is if he over plays his hand. It appears that McCain might even move his campaign headquarters to Georgia (sarcasm here). Anyway there is a fine line between getting it right and milking it. McCain should move on (unless the situation gets worse) and be happy he got it right.

Posted by: sltiowa | August 16, 2008 10:34 AM | Report abuse

For what its worth:

I've decided to officially endorse the ticket of Misty May/Kerri Walsh '08!!!

No other nation would dare mess with us. And their victory celebration would be, no doubt, unforgettable...

Posted by: PS | August 16, 2008 10:27 AM | Report abuse

McCain wins the week. Agree or disagree with his response to Russia, he at least seemed to have a serious opinion on the matter.

http://politicswithagrin.blogspot.com/

Posted by: Kristen | August 16, 2008 10:10 AM | Report abuse

I'd say McCain won the week, hands down. He finally managed to get himself picked up on the media's radar screen.

All it took was a week when Obama was on vacation; when everyone was distracted by the Olympics; and when the summer news was so slow that CNN actually ran a headline on Bigfoot. Very impressive, Sen. McCain! In about six months or so, people might actually begin to realize that you were the Republican nominee for president of the Unites States.

Posted by: scrapster | August 16, 2008 10:08 AM | Report abuse

McCain's biggest week yet. The tracking polls tell the story. Leading 3-5 points, Obama surrendered his advantage while on vacation and the two main tracking polls are now tied and only +1.
McCain's campaign tactics are offensive and his war mongering over Georgia is pathetic, but, in the heartland it is working.
Obama is losing this election and will continue to do so unless he can show that he is a decisive leader. When he speaks, all I hear are his uhms, equivocations and lack of certainty. This is not the mark of a leader.
I'm depressed as hell

Posted by: cferry3124@aol.com | August 16, 2008 10:08 AM | Report abuse

scrivener

Hillary is no longer in the game. She may be hooting from the sidelines but it's Mccain/Obama...

and considering most of Hillary's delegate support has moved toward Obama since the close ... because they do not have to worry about her and retribution ...they can vote for what strengthens the party and theplatform...and the issues.

So please stop spinning. She won nothing.

Posted by: dl | August 16, 2008 9:25 AM | Report abuse

Michael Phelps won the week!

Posted by: mark | August 16, 2008 8:58 AM | Report abuse

Billary won the week. The convention is now seemingly under its control. And so, instead of talking about Obama just one week prior to Denver, this is what America is asking: Will Hillary concede prior to a roll call; Will Billary demand a roll call for the Veep slot; Will Billary convince enough delegates that Obama can't win and actually make Hillary or someone else the nominee; Will Bill use his speech to pump up Obama or send anti-Obama signals? Can you even imagine a candidate so weak that he is forced to submit to all these questions before his supposedly shining moment. The scene in that stadium before the 75,000 shills will seem anti-climatic; in fact, maybe BO will even be forced to have Socks on the podium that night or the Clintons will endorse McCain. Wouldn't that be the purrfect TV moment,

Posted by: jayjay9 | August 16, 2008 8:02 AM | Report abuse

Kobe Braynt was the winner who was not ashamed to say he loves America.Watch this interview .. It's unbelievable! I am not a basketball fan and I don't much care about kobe, but his response is awesome ..Maybe Obama needs to follow Kobe's lead to improve his polling numbers:

http://msunderestimated.com/NBCQuestionsKobesPatriotism.wmv


Collinsworth: Where does the patriotism come from inside of you? Historically, what is it?

Kobe: Well, you know it’s just our country, it’s… we believe is the greatest country in the world. It has given us so many great opportunities, and it’s just a sense of pride that you have; that you say ‘You know what? Our country is the best!’

Collinsworth: Is that a ‘cool’ thing to say, in this day and age? That you love your country, and that you’re fighting for the red, white and blue? It seems sort of like a day gone by.

Kobe: No, it’s a cool thing for me to say. I feel great about it, and I’m not ashamed to say it. I mean, this is a tremendous honor.

Posted by: Frieda | August 16, 2008 2:20 AM | Report abuse

Putin and his hand picked figure head Medvedev assured John McCain a victory this week by reminding us all that the delivery of a speech against the war in Iraq by Barack Obama before he was a Senator, followed by the support of funding of the war while we served in the Senate, is just a shameful lack of foreign policy experience in this very dangerous world. The deadly dance of Russia/Georgia/America/Poland/NATO could, in the wrong sequence, lead to a situation that makes the Cuban Missle Crisis resemble Vieques. America has been reminded 80 days before the election that 25 years of Senatorial foreign policy experience is an important benefit only one candidate delivers. If there is one area where McCain stands out from both Obama AND Bush, it's in dealing with the rest of the world. Bush learned on the job...in this very dangerous time, we can't afford to train another novice. Although, I'm sure the Russians would prefer it.
McCain wins the week, as our attention turns around the world in 80 days.

Posted by: Scott | August 16, 2008 1:36 AM

Posted by: Scott | August 16, 2008 1:38 AM | Report abuse

Putin and his hand picked figure head Medvedev assured John McCain a victory this week by reminding us all that the delivery of a speech against the war in Iraq by Barack Obama before he was a Senator, followed by the support of funding of the war while we served in the Senate, is just a shameful lack of foreign policy experience in this very dangerous world. The deadly dance of Russia/Georgia/America/Poland/NATOcould, in the wrong sequence, lead to a situation that makes the Cuban Missle Crisis resemble Viaques. America has been reminded 80 days before the election that 25 years of Senatorial foreign policy experience is an important benefit only one candidate delivers. If there is one area where McCain stands out from both Obama AND Bush, it's in dealing with the rest of the world. Bush learned on the job...in this very dangerous time, we can't afford to train another novice. Although, I'm sure the Russians would prefer it.
McCain wins the week, as our attention goes around the world in 80 days.

Posted by: Scott | August 16, 2008 1:36 AM | Report abuse

McCain lost because he clearly showed to anyone who was paying attention he is a warmonger, who seeks a return to the cold war and quite possibly additional military interventions in other countries. McCain is not a Teddy Roosevelt type president, as he imagines himself, because TR, despite his occasional bellicose rhetoric, actually employed diplomacy more often than war to resolve conflicts and was not a puppet to the corporations, as McCain, Bush and Cheney.

McCain is also not an Eisenhower president, because he, unlike Ike, is far more prone to seem to prefer military threats and confrontations than diplomacy. One can not imagine McCain criticizing, as Ike did, the military industrial complex.

Posted by: Independent | August 16, 2008 1:32 AM | Report abuse

The week's winner is Obama. He was able to stay out of the limelight while McCain shot himself in the foot with his "we are all Georgians" comment. Saahkasvilli called him on by saying "yes that's very nice but it doesn't help us here." The Georgian president then stuck a knife in Bush and McCain's back by equating them to Chamberland and selling out Georgia by appeasing Russia. The Obama campaign should run Saahkasvilli's comments in an add that ends "America can't afford McCain's foreign policy experience?"

Posted by: Repub | August 16, 2008 1:31 AM | Report abuse

8/15/08

This is like a scene out of the movie "The Gambler," by Kenny Rogers.

The last several weeks have been a draw and this week as well.

This is the calm before the storm.

And saying that the Obama camp gave Hillary Clinton the Roll Call Vote for the Convention.

It is like Obama is the young boy on the block who just got his feet wet.

He has been all over the map politically and geographically.

And Obama's camp fires back at McCain about Britney Spears and Paris Hilton.

Well how in God's earth did you get a jump start but with a celebrity?

Oprah Winfrey.

Obama and his wife and Oprah were big on the stage in the beginning so whose playing media and whose playing the cards there gambler?

And the accusations about McCain attempting to act presidential.

Well who else has been attempting to act like the president while giving a radio address straight from Hawaii no less on vacation.

If any of the voters are savvy enough to know normally there is a radio address by the President once a week and also a democratic response.

What preempted the display in Georgia and Russia was the trip by Obama to Berlin and other countries as to say,"World please vote for me."

It is a disgrace what the American people are dealing with as far as electing a new president.

Instead of one president it looks like we have (3) presidents running side by side like the Olympics.

And we the people of the United States are being played, "The Gambler."

Oh, gee give Hillary Clinton the Roll Call Vote at the Convention so I can get the rest of her votes.

What the hell do they think that the American people are stupid?

Senator Hillary Clinton and President Bill Clinton have so much power and clout politically it will decades for Obama to ever catch up.

It is like having a surrogate. The surrogate does all the work and has all the braun and brain but the non-surrogate suppose to get all the credit.

I don't think so.

Hillary supporters did not want Obama and they don't want Obama.

In addition to that they feel like the elections has been severely tainted with gender bias.

And to add insult to injury although some of the press reported when Obama came back from his tour in Berlin that perhaps it was not a good idea.

One thing. You can't fool an intuitive who is also politically savvy.

There was a winfall by going to Iraq, Kuwait, and Berlin and so forth.

They are called "absentee ballots."

Whether or not anyone is aware but I am that military designees vote absentee ballot and of course by smoozing with the troops somewhat has brought on some of voters in voting for one or the other.

And to highlight these events Governor Charlie Christ reported in an interview this past week that Obama voted for Bush-Cheney Big oil and McCain got on the Senate floor and voted against it.

So don't be fooled with some lavish new ad saying that we will win the world.

This type of thinking is a mindset of doctrines long ago which are associated with dictatorhips.

Diane M. Newman-Gregerson
Julian, Ca.


Posted by: Diane M. Newman-Gregerson | August 16, 2008 12:57 AM | Report abuse

8/15/08

This is like a scene out of the movie "The Gambler," by Kenny Rogers.

The last several weeks have been a draw and this week as well.

This is the calm before the storm.

And saying that the Obama camp gave Hillary Clinton the Roll Call Vote for the Convention.

It is like Obama is the young boy on the block who just got his feet wet.

He has been all over the map politically and geographically.

And Obama's camp fires back at McCain about Britney Spears and Paris Hilton.

Well how in God's earth did you get a jump start but with a celebrity?

Oprah Winfrey.

Obama and his wife and Oprah were big on the stage in the beginning so whose playing media and whose playing the cards there gambler?

And the accusations about McCain attempting to act presidential.

Well who else has been attempting to act like the president while giving a radio address straight from Hawaii no less on vacation.

If any of the voters are savvy enough to know normally there is a radio address by the President once a week and also a democratic response.

What preempted the display in Georgia and Russia was the trip by Obama to Berlin and other countries as to say,"World please vote for me."

It is a disgrace what the American people are dealing with as far as electing a new president.

Instead of one president it looks like we have (3) presidents running side by side like the Olympics.

And we the people of the United States are being played, "The Gambler."

Oh, gee give Hillary Clinton the Roll Call Vote at the Convention so I can get the rest of her votes.

What the hell do they think that the American people are stupid?

Senator Hillary Clinton and President Bill Clinton have so much power and clout politically it will decades for Obama to ever catch up.

It is like having a surrogate. The surrogate does all the work and has all the braun and brain but the non-surrogate suppose to get all the credit.

I don't think so.

Hillary supporters did not want Obama and they don't want Obama.

In addition to that they feel like the elections has been severely tainted with gender bias.

And to add insult to injury although some of the press reported when Obama came back from his tour in Berlin that perhaps it was not a good idea.

One thing. You can't fool an intuitive who is also politically savvy.

There was a winfall by going to Iraq, Kuwait, and Berlin and so forth.

They are called "absentee ballots."

Whether or not anyone is aware but I am that military designees vote absentee ballot and of course by smoozing with the troops somewhat has brought on some of voters in voting for one or the other.

And to highlight these events Governor Charlie Christ reported in an interview this past week that Obama voted for Bush-Cheney Big oil and McCain got on the Senate floor and voted against it.

So don't be fooled with some lavish new ad saying that we will win the world.

This type of thinking is a mindset of doctrines long ago which are associated with dictatorhips.

Diane M. Newman-Gregerson
Julian, Ca.


Posted by: Diane M. Newman-Gregerson | August 16, 2008 12:55 AM | Report abuse

McCain. With Obama on vacation, McCain stayed in his comfort zone and pressed the Russia/Georgia issue for most of the week. He also managed to (relatively) quietly test the conservative noise on a pro-choice VP pick during a week dominated by Olympics coverage. Not an overly noisy week for either, but Mccain got a lot of work done.

Posted by: Gericho | August 16, 2008 12:25 AM | Report abuse

Rusha....

Posted by: angriestdogintheworld | August 15, 2008 10:51 PM | Report abuse

Fairlington:

Then it wouldn't be a SURPRISE.

Not 10... more like 200... just enough to deny Obama the nomination.

Then the drama begins. Hey, how about this one: Maybe they BOTH agree to throw their delegates to Gore, saying he deserves the office the Supremes took away from them. And then Hillary becomes a Supreme and Obama is Gore's veep.

DOUBLE SURPRISE!

"Fairlington Blade" sounds like a high school newspaper...

Posted by: scrivener | August 15, 2008 10:47 PM | Report abuse

No one won the week but John McBush definately LOST the week.


It seems like John McBush forgot about a crisis or two or three.
http://thinkprogress.org/2008/08/15/mccain-russia/


Given that McCain has been using the situation in Georgia to pretend he's the president (speaking of presumptuous), it's not surprising that he wants to present this as the biggest crisis ever. And he's right, assuming you forget the Gulf War, and Somalia, and the Rwandan Genocide, and the earlier war in Georgia, and the breakup of Yugoslavia and all the wars that spawned, and 9/11, and Afghanistan, and Iraq and North Korean nuclear testing, and the war in Lebanon, and Darfur -- then this is the first serious international crisis since the end of the Cold War.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/08/14/AR2008081403332_pf.html


McCain is either senile or he's dumber than a bag of rocks

Posted by: McCain = Bush's third term | August 15, 2008 10:41 PM | Report abuse

The National Enquirer won the week. It had the best story of this election cycle, and made the MSM look like chumps with its doggedness. So what if John Edwards is more celebrity than politician? The NE's skepticism and unwillingness to take a pol at his word are the gold standard for 2008.

A close second is bondjedi, for his mad skills and sweet moves putting many chumps in check.

Posted by: bondjedi | August 15, 2008 10:31 PM | Report abuse

Obama won for the week. He released ads attacking McCain; eventhough he is vacating with his famiy in Hawaii.

Posted by: peggy farrar | August 15, 2008 10:31 PM | Report abuse

So, Scrivener, care to name those 10 delegates who have publicly committed to switching away from Obama? I didn't think so.

BB

Posted by: Fairlington Blade | August 15, 2008 10:29 PM | Report abuse

HILLARY AND McCAIN WON THE WEEK; OBAMA LOST
BY BASKING, LAZING AND REFUSING TO ENGAGE.


Hillary Clinton won the week, followed closely by John McCain.

Hillary forced Obama's hand, making him publicly agree to a roll call vote that could represent a trojan horse strategy to deny him the presidential nomination. Obama's camp called it "symbolic," but there's no way that they can get away with anything short of a binding vote; anything less would reek of sexism and, in fact, might be deemed a violation of law.

All Hillary has to do is convince some 200 delegates to come back to her side and Obama cannot secure the nomination. That's real power, despite attempts by the punditocracy to paint this Hillary victory as a "savvy" move by Obama. Truth is, Obama had no choice -- unless this is all part of a scripted play that will climax with an announcement that Hillary is his VP choice.

That's possible; but Hillary also could capture the prize for herself, or she could throw her delegates to a third candidate such as Al Gore, who would then name Obama his VP in a swift and effective unity move.

Either way, it's Hillary, not Obama, that's holding the cards; even if he asks her to take the VP position, she could always say no and take it to the floor. In a very real sense, the putsch is on, and Hillary is winning.

As for McCain, he looked presidential by showing up and taking command on the Georgia invasion -- although he committed a serious gaffe by saying that nations don't invade other nations in the 21st century. Guess he forgot about Iraq.

Obama strangely failed to cut short his vacation, looking like an aloof dilettante. By week's end, tracking polls showed him slipping further, proof that he badly bungling the week. If he's not taking Hillary as his VP, he could be on the brink of one of the greatest reversals of fortune in American political history.


BUT WILL THE ELECTION EVEN MATTER? Not when government-supported "vigilante injustice" squads are targeting Americans outside of the bounds of the law:
http://www.nowpublic.com/world/get-political-vic-livingston-opinion-expose-state-supported-vigilante-squads-doing-domestic-terrorism

Posted by: scrivener | August 15, 2008 9:56 PM | Report abuse

John went out of his way to give Obama more ammunition. He thinks he won because he jumped one checker, but he exposed about half his board to subsequent jumps and will regret the move.

You see, he showed that, like George, words are substitutes for action.

He gave this (well, vapid is the best description I can think of) rousing speach "WE are ALL Georgians... We Support ..." Then he applied the jawbone motivation, in mimicry of his man George, and went off to find other things to want us to think he is. (We doubt that he wants us to think of him as most of us actually think of him.)

Would someone please ask him to spell SUPPORT? He definitely can't define it.

In so doing he became the very reincarnation of one of the Republican Party's greatest Heroes, good ole IKE. Talk, berate the Military Industrial Complex. Watch your friends get rich in that complex. Commit your successor to endless war, but on your own watch, jsut watch as freedom dies under Russian Tank Treads. If the Dems can just play a montage of Ike on Hungary and John on Georgia, his military hero bona fides will crumble into dust.

McCain wins a doubled pawn, obama sets up to win, in return, Johns Queen, his remaining bishop, and probably a side bet on John's shirt.

But that is next month when it counts.

And the BombObomba claque now decides that taking a vacation is a crime. John is going to hibernate, shortly, till the convention. Will the BOMBOBOMBA boys deride him, too, for acting presidential?

Posted by: ceflynline@msn.com | August 15, 2008 9:54 PM | Report abuse

HILLARY AND McCAIN WON THE WEEK; OBAMA LOST
BY BASKING, LAZING AND REFUSING TO ENGAGE.


Hillary Clinton won the week, followed closely by John McCain.

Hillary forced Obama's hand, making him publicly agree to a roll call vote that could represent a trojan horse strategy to deny him the presidential nomination. Obama's camp called it "symbolic," but there's no way that they can get away with anything short of a binding vote; anything less would reek of sexism and, in fact, might be deemed a violation of law.

All Hillary has to do is convince some 200 delegates to come back to her side and Obama cannot secure the nomination. That's real power, despite attempts by the punditocracy to paint this Hillary victory as a "savvy" move by Obama. Truth is, Obama had no choice -- unless this is all part of a scripted play that will climax with an announcement that Hillary is his VP choice.

That's possible; but Hillary also could capture the prize for herself, or she could throw her delegates to a third candidate such as Al Gore, who would then name Obama his VP in a swift and effective unity move.

Either way, it's Hillary, not Obama, that's holding the cards; even if he asks her to take the VP position, she could always say no and take it to the floor. In a very real sense, the putsch is on, and Hillary is winning.

As for McCain, he looked presidential by showing up and taking command on the Georgia invasion -- although he committed a serious gaffe by saying that nations don't invade other nations in the 21st century. Guess he forgot about Iraq.

Obama strangely failed to cut short his vacation, looking life an aloof dillatante. By week's end, tracking polls showed him slipping further, proof that he badly bungling the week. If he's not taking Hillary as his VP, he could be on the brink of one of the greatest reversal of fortunes in American political history.


BUT WILL THE ELECTION EVEN MATTER? Not when government-supported "vigilante injustice" squads are targeting Americans outside of the bounds of the law:
http://www.nowpublic.com/world/get-political-vic-livingston-opinion-expose-state-supported-vigilante-squads-doing-domestic-terrorism

Posted by: scrivener | August 15, 2008 9:50 PM | Report abuse

Obama wins the week!

As he said in Iowa, we need to not only end the war in Iraq but the mindset that got us there in the first place. McCain was all over the news demonstrating the mindset of a go-it-alone, military (only - no diplomacy) threats that threaten to restart the Cold War (protecting not the USA but a client of his lobbyist campaign aide.) Meanwhile, Obama takes a break from vacation to demonstrate real leadership with his balanced approach of pointing out the errors of Georgia while joining with the international community in condeming the war.

And, McCain loses by overstepping his boundaries by claiming that he speaks for all Americans -- a Republican Senator from Arizona does not speak for this Californian progressive. And where does he get off sending a delegation to Georgia? Talk about presumptuous; we have one president at a time and it isn't John McCain at the moment (or hopefully ever!)

Add to this Obama's clear and, dare I say, swift response to the attack book shows that he has learned the lesson from John Kerry's mistake in 2004.

And, Obama sets a new fundraising record with his 2 millionth donor!

Posted by: PeninsulaMatt | August 15, 2008 9:01 PM | Report abuse

but I think Benjamin won the challenge...lol

Posted by: dl | August 15, 2008 8:59 PM | Report abuse

Obama was on a beach in Hawaii and didn't lose ground.

McCain got to think about and prepare for his favorite favorite "favorite with whip cream on top" thing to talk about on Saturday (sarcastic) ....Jesus Christ.

Who do you think won.

lol

Posted by: dl | August 15, 2008 8:57 PM | Report abuse

McCain scored some points with the Corsi sucker punch, but Obama will counter next week. Obama is still winning, and is playing a very strong hand in this election, but anything can still happen.

McCain got the week. But he got it in a dirty way.

Posted by: Corruption Anon | August 15, 2008 8:40 PM | Report abuse

Who won???? McCain got the press, and in that way won- but.... His press on Georgia will come back to haunt him, reinforcing the idea that his forign policy experttise has been dramatically overrated (and bringing up the cursed lobbyist issue for himn, for the nth time).

Obama has put Clinton on the spot- if she does not play nice, she is an outcast in the Party- if she does, she has to take the flak from her core supporters. Obama now has made this a "heads I win, tails you lose" proposition.

Difficult to win while on "vacation," but given the self immolating McCain campaign, Obama probably managed it.

Posted by: jhherring | August 15, 2008 8:38 PM | Report abuse

"We want to avoid any armed conflict, and we will not have armed conflict,"

So I see that McCain is now deciding when and where we will go to war now?
Is he running a government inside a government by sending his "emissaries" to Georgia? Did he ask president Bush?, or congress, or anybody else?

How presumptuous!

Posted by: Anonymous | August 15, 2008 8:14 PM | Report abuse

McCain wins by default because of the Georgia crisis, Corsi's naughty book, and the fact that Obama was in Hawaii the entire week. Hard to win it when you're AWOL on a beach.

http://www.political-buzz.com/

Posted by: matt | August 15, 2008 7:36 PM

Just so you know, the last three quarters of AWOL stand for "without leave." Whose authority is Obama violating by visiting his grandmother?

And I second MarkInAustin's take, McCain won by playing the belligerent ignoramus act that once had Bush's approval rating in the 90's before the consequences became clear and it sank to 27%.

Posted by: aleks | August 15, 2008 8:08 PM | Report abuse

McC won for the first time in recent memory. He did not win by acting thoughtfully and carefully about his take on Georgia. He did not win by doing the right thing or saying the correct words. He won because he defined the situation sharply and appeared decisive.

In fact it was reckless of McC to sabre rattle against Russia with no force to back it up, and in contrast to the voice that speaks for America in foreign affairs, the President. This demonstrates again that bad policy can make for good politics.

Posted by: MarkInAustin | August 15, 2008 8:00 PM | Report abuse

McCain wins by default because of the Georgia crisis, Corsi's naughty book, and the fact that Obama was in Hawaii the entire week. Hard to win it when you're AWOL on a beach.

http://www.political-buzz.com/

Posted by: matt | August 15, 2008 7:36 PM | Report abuse

Who won the week ?

The readers of the Fix who were thrilled to welcome back to work a tanned, relaxed and Spanish-speaking Chris Cilizza.

Bonus: Chris Cilizza whose bodysurfing pictures were not published in the National Enquirer and who is not wearing that stupid Argentinian hat anymore.

Posted by: Benjamin | August 15, 2008 7:22 PM | Report abuse

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