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FixCam: The Campaign That Was...

Now that the Democratic presidential primary campaign is over (right?), The Fix has been doing two things:

1. Sleeping

2. Reflecting back on the campaign that was.

There were any number of great moments during the primary fight, but we thought hard to come up with the one image that encapsulated the entire race for us.

It was a rally for Barack Obama at Nashua North High School a few days before the Granite State's critical primary. Driving up to the school more than an hour before the event was set to begin, a line of hundreds of people snaked around the building; the first of the group had arrived at 7:30 a.m. (the event started at 10 a.m.) to brave the cold -- a cold only true Northeasterners can truly know -- to be the first into the building to see Obama.

This scene was repeated time and time again on the campaign trail at rallies for both Obama and Hillary Rodham Clinton. It typified one thing that often gets lost in the coverage of this protracted campaign -- more people got a chance to participate (and were enthused about doing so) than in any presidential race we can remember. That is a good thing for all of us.

What's your one lasting memory of the primary campaign? The image or audio that jumps to mind when you think back on the battle between Obama and Clinton? Post your own reflections in the comments section below. If we get enough, we'll excerpt some of the best in a separate Fix post over the weekend.

By Chris Cillizza  |  June 5, 2008; 4:12 PM ET
Categories:  FixCam  
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Comments

I have left the democratic party for good! I will not vote period. I am a Pakistani american woman and my birth county elected a woman twice and this country not once in its history. Shame on the dnc for the way Hillary has been treated. Makes DNC no better then the Taliban in my view. Down with the Democratic party!

Posted by: Mary | June 11, 2008 11:28 AM | Report abuse

Don't ya just love it when men say "just wait", your time will come...LOL Well read this comment from another blog.. doesn't sound like she is waiting....

Women have been messed over for many years by the Democrat Party and it appears that millions of "US" will be returning the favor, should this primary season continue on its current path. Hillary Clinton is clearly the best choice to be our party's nominee for President. As a life-long Democrat, age 55, I think the way my party has hosed Hillary and their most loyal and largest voting block; women intolerable. I am confident the Democrat Party will pay a severe price for this blatant assault on women in November. Cry all you want about this being "sour grapes" but little good will result from your on-going efforts to rally Hillary's staunch supporters around your chosen candidate instead of the people's choice. Now, the Democrat Party leaders want women to get their pre- selected from the start, elite, wimp, Barack Obama elected in November. It will be cold day in hell before I comply and I also hope Hillary walks away from this Party. Most of the women, and many men as well, with whom I have contact are finished with the Democrat Party, now and forever. Also, many of "US" are starting a grassroots movement to insure these kind of sorry tactics employed by my now soon to be former party, never happen again. This clear favoring of Obama, making him the nominee because the party doesn't want a woman, especially a Clinton woman, is more that I can tolerate. Of all the gall, the Democrat Party now expects "US" girls, including Hillary, to turn over our undying support to Obama. Sorry guys, this is not going to happen. Obama has no shot of winning in November without Hillary's help and all of us, her supporters. Not on your life or in your wildest dreams is this going to happen.


Posted by: BMW | June 11, 2008 8:29 AM | Report abuse

If the Press had been more responsible and exposed Obama earlier he would NEVER have won as many states as he did. The media suppressed the information for months and let voters be decieved. They attacked Hillary and puffed up Obama trying to run this election. Voters deserved to be informed of Obama's associations with Anti American, racist, white hating, criminals and terrorists. It goes to the man's judgement of who he chooses to be in the company with.

Posted by: BMW | June 11, 2008 8:26 AM | Report abuse

His wife will probably hang that god awful african art all over the White House. That place will need a good scrubbing when they eventually move out of there.

Posted by: PeaPod | June 10, 2008 12:50 PM | Report abuse

I read somewhere that Michelle Obama was arrested at the age of 16 in Gary, IN for shoplifting. Can we trust her in the Executive Mansion with all those valuable antiques?

Posted by: Sandy | June 10, 2008 12:45 PM | Report abuse


Your party is history, Chris.
Only people who are still fighting WW2 in their heads have any connection with it.

Posted by: wardropper | June 10, 2008 12:28 PM | Report abuse

To bring us together, tell these white women that they need to get over it and to stand back and take a look at the situation instead of flying off the handle. Now we have had women Presidents and Prime Ministers who have ran western and 1st world developed countries before, take for instance Margaret Thatcher, Golda Meier, Sirimavo Bandaranaike, and Indira Gandhi, but never have we had a black man to run such a country has ours now have we. This is a moment in history that we might not ever see again at least for many more years. Just look at how the rest of the world will view us now, like we've done something that just 20, 30 , 40yrs ago people would have said that you are crazy for even thinking about such a thing. Just tell them to hold on a little while longer, the white women will eventually get her due she always does, who gets control right now when one of the CEO's who happens to be a male dies, or what if Tiger Woods would die who gets control of his millions, so just be cool ladies your time is coming!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by: Mr.Suane B.Huff | June 9, 2008 7:44 PM | Report abuse

One of the most memorable moments for me was the look on the face of Gov. Bill Richardson when he endorsed Obama. He looked how I felt, a little surprised and very disappointed that Senator Clinton was actually going to stoop so low as to trash Obama, a fellow Democrat, and use the kind of sick, fear-mongering tactics of the people she used to despise, just to try to get the win for herself.

Bill Clinton himself said that if one candidate was talking about hope and the other was trying to scare you, you'd better go with the candidate talking about hope...and yet Hillary Clinton ran the 3:00 a.m. ad against someone in her own party. I knew at that moment that Hillary Clinton was, indeed, willing to say or do anything to win, no matter how much it hurt the Democratic Party.

As we know, she went on to do just that...she praised McCain, cozied up to right wing nut jobs who used to use the worst tactics against her, trashed Obama over Rev. Wright while she had both a present and a past full of dubious advisors and associates who have done much worse than what Rev. Wright did, called Obama elitist when Obama had an ordinary upbringing and she came from a privileged background, mislead and provoked her supporters into believing that Obama had cheated her out of victory even though he had followed the rules (that she had agreed to until she started losing) and had come up with a more effective strategy, damaged not only the party but feminism and her women supporters by blaming her loss on sexism instead of owning up to the clear and numerous failures of her own campaign, and embarrassed herself by failing to at least give Obama a call when he won...something she would have screamed bloody murder over if Obama had done it to her.

I didn't realize just how deceitful and manipulative Hillary Clinton would be after that day Bill Richardson endorsed Obama, but she lost my support and a whole lot of my respect on that day.

Posted by: Jennifer Knickerbocker | June 9, 2008 2:23 PM | Report abuse

The moment I remember most vividly is when The Fix promised to grow a beard and not shave it off until we knew the identities of both parties' nominees. America was cheated! Justice must prevail! Fix, you owe us six months' worth of stubble!

Posted by: Bill Cash | June 7, 2008 3:15 PM | Report abuse

The Robert Smigel cartoon on Saturday Night Live where Obama told Jesse Jacskon and Al Sharpton that they were involved in the campaign, and then did everything he could to keep them out of the spotlight.

It may have been intended as a joke, but has anybody seen Jesse or Al anywhere near Obama?

If Obama wins, Jackson and Sharpton are finally pushed off Center Stage as representive of Black America, and African Americans will have a legitimate visible leader for the first time in 40 years.

Won't that be refreshing.

Posted by: Don Imus | June 7, 2008 2:05 PM | Report abuse

If Obama wanted to mence fences with Hillary he SHOULD HAVE THOUGHT ABOUT THAT BEFORE HE USED RACE IN A CAMPAIGN THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO BE POST-RACIAL.

He should have thought about that before he made false charges of "offensive remarks" against Bill Clinton in South Carolina.


Obama was never offended.

He should have thought about what would happen down the road BEFORE he made false charges of "offensive remarks" against Gerry Ferraro.


What a pathetic man Obama is.


NOW Obama wants the country to vote for him because he has better "judgement" than McCain.


What kind of "judgement" did Obama show in South Carolina??


What kind of judgement did he show when Obama voted to fund the war???

What kind of judgement did Obama show bringing his children to Rev. Wright's church week after week, year after year???


WHAT kind of judgement did Obama show making a real estate deal with Resko after he was elected to the US Senate?

WHAT kind of judgement did he show making friends and hanging out with William Ayers, a terrorist who bombed the Capitol Building and the Pentagon ? (younger people do not know about that)

WHAT kind of judgement did Obama show when he actually thought that NO ONE would point any of this out ???

Posted by: Anonymous | June 7, 2008 1:23 AM | Report abuse

the moment that stood out for me was the day I found a phone msg from my die-hard republican relatives asking "are you going? call bk" to an Obama rally in Phoenix. didn't have to say where or to see what because since Obama came on the scene we'd talked more than in the past 5 yrs put together. we'd given up discussing politics previously because a fight would break out especially when the Clintons were mentioned.

so I packed up my 2 and 4 yr olds, 8 months prego at the time and drove the 90 min from Tucson to Phoenix to hear Obama.
Unfortunately my 2 yr old was terrified by the 20,000 people in attendance so I spent half the speech in the hallway of the arena listening.

but I thought something is definitely happening here, republicans are actually listening to this guy!
leaving that rally was the first time we had a rational discussion about politics. they weren't instantly sold but Obama actually got them to come hear his ideas and to THINK.

Posted by: indie11 | June 6, 2008 11:14 PM | Report abuse


If Obama wanted to mence fences with Hillary he SHOULD HAVE THOUGHT ABOUT THAT BEFORE HE PULLED HIS RACE BAITING IN SOUTH CAROLINA.


He should have thought about that before he made false charges of offensive remarks against Bill Clinton.


Obama was never offended. He should have thought about that BEFORE he made false charges of "offensive remarks" against Gerry Ferraro.


What a pathetic man Obama is.


NOW Obama wants the country to vote for him because he has better "judgement" than McCain. What kind of "judgement" did Obama show in South Carolina?? What kind of judgement did he show when Obama voted to fund the war??? What kind of judgement did Obama show bringing his children to Rev. Wright's church week after week, year after year. WHAT kind of judgement did Obama show making a real estate deal with Resko after he was elected to the US Senate? WHAT kind of judgement did he show making friends and hanging out with William Ayers, a terrorist who bombed the Capitol Building and the Pentagon ? (younger people do not know about that) WHAT kind of judgement did Obama show when he actually thought that NO ONE would point any of this out ???


.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 6, 2008 9:26 PM | Report abuse

I needed to come back and add this note that it's another image of this campaign, Chris, that you're seeing so clearly illustrated in the responses to your article below: the professional and/or obsessive posters whose only purpose seems to be to obstruct constructive discourse by pushing authentic and open responses to the bottom of the page and out-of-view.

Posted by: Carmen Cameron | June 6, 2008 6:23 PM | Report abuse

My best memory is this: I was going door-to-door for Obama in a bad part of Philly. As I was walking away from one door that it appeared no one was going to answer, it opened and a very old woman - probably in her 90s - came to the door. She was holding a drip by her side with one hand and a cane in the other. I asked if she was registered to vote and she said yes, she's been registered her whole life. Then I asked who she's be supporting in the primary and she said Barack Obama. I thanked her and turned to go, but then she asked me a favor. She said now that I'd gotten her up out of her chair I needed to help her untangle the drip tube from around her foot. I knelt down and carefully untangled her, then thanked her and walked off. That 90+ year old woman in Philly who is voting for Barack Obama. That's who I remember.

Posted by: Russell | June 6, 2008 3:00 PM | Report abuse

First, let me say how SICK I am of the negative anecdotes, the trashing by TV personalities, the 700 Obama bloggers trashing Hillary all over the internet!
My lasting memory is her poised and brilliant debating in every debate, which none of the other candidates came close to equalling! In every setting, she performs well with endless energy and civility. Choosing our candidate should be an intellectual decision--not a rockstar moment!
We will SEE who ends up with the nomination--stay tuned, this aint over!

Posted by: JanL | June 6, 2008 2:17 PM | Report abuse

HELP WANTED
Need VP for the president to be, Baraka Hussein Obama

Qualification and requirements
-will fight for him till the end and win the Electoral College and popular votes (sorry caucuses don't count)
-strong commander-in-chief and leadership quality
- Strong in national security and military
-knowledgeable and experienced in dealing with issues such as economy, healthcare, education, housing
-knowledge, leadership and experience in foreign affairs
-knowledge, leadership in dealing with our national energy and housing crisis
- knowledge, leadership in how turn our economy around and create Green Jobs!
-must reach out to women, blue-color workers, elders, Hispanics, and low-income voters
-has high skills in speech and can deliver and articulate speeches without teleprompter
-must look presidential and handle debates regarding presidential election

For God sake who need him when we can have all that and more with Hillary.

Posted by: nancy | June 6, 2008 11:30 AM | Report abuse

When I heard Obama's victory speach after the Iowa caucus I cried, because I knew then he was going to be our next President.

Posted by: TM Moore | June 6, 2008 11:22 AM | Report abuse

My lasting memory of the campaign has been a picture of Sen. Clinton holding up boxing gloves after one of the early debates, claiming that the boys were ganging up on her. Initially, I only found it somewhat disquieting, that attacking her policies in a debate (especially since she was the frontrunner at the time) was viewed as sexism. But it has really stuck with me and come to represent her sense of entitlement due to her gender.

Posted by: Meg | June 6, 2008 11:15 AM | Report abuse

Now all he needs to do is find a good VP. This site holds a Vice President Poll every week, so you can see what America thinks. Just visit:

http://www.votenic.com

and help your favorite candidate choose his/her running mate. They started a VP poll last week, and the results from that poll have just been posted. This poll is honest and represents all of America.

Posted by: freeg | June 6, 2008 10:36 AM | Report abuse

I will never forget the media trashing Hillary including you Chris.

My vote will be against the media and for the more experienced person. I am a democrat and hated Fox news. How could I now feel Fox was fair and balanced, and you Chris, and all the other media were dogmatic.

I feel Obama is anoher Media choice similar to McGovern, Kerry,

Posted by: J Carney | June 6, 2008 8:14 AM | Report abuse

I will never forget the media trashing Hillary including you Chris.

My vote will be against the media and for the more experienced person. I am a democrat and hated Fox news. How could I now feel Fox was fair and balanced, and you Chris, and all the other media were dogmatic.

I feel Obama is anoher Media choice similar to McGovern, Kerry,

Posted by: J Carney | June 6, 2008 8:14 AM | Report abuse

I will never forget the media trashing Hillary including you Chris.

My vote will be against the media and for the more experienced person. I am a democrat and hated Fox news. How could I now feel Fox was fair and balanced, and you Chris, and all the other media were dogmatic.

I feel Obama is anoher Media choice similar to McGovern, Kerry,

Posted by: J Carney | June 6, 2008 8:14 AM | Report abuse

Chris:


The most important reflection to make on this campaign is this: Hillary did this to herself. Hillary had more than enough people supporting her at one time or another to win the nomination and go on and win in November - but she drove them away.


It started from the first days in 1993.


Hillary went into the White House and was NASTY FROM DAY ONE.


Seriously.


There is a story that there was a list of people waiting for interviews for Presidential appointments - campaign workers and supporters. Hillary went through the list and declared that there were too many "White Males." She ordered hundreds of people CUT from the list based on that criteria - and ordered a search of non-campaign workers and non-supporters to fill minority and women supporters.

hhhhmmmmmmm

Does this sound famiiar? See Hillary CUT her natural supporters and went off in a direction - many of the people they got for those positions had little loyalty to Hillary or the Clintons - they had loyalty to affirmative action. The people who were on the original list were naturally offended and had little reason to completely support the Clintons from that day forward.


Chris if you look back - thousands of Presidential appointments took a long time to fill in 1993 - ask around the news room see if you can get someone to confirm this story.

Hillary continued to conduct herself in a way that did not build support - instead she knew better - she never had a good reputation from the early early days of the campaign - the secret service had secret names for her in 1992.

Hillary decided to run for President in 1998 - from that point it was all about her.


Her support for Al Gore was weak - she stole valuable media time from him in 2000 - and that may have been one major factor why Al Gore did not make it that year.


Hillary was not focused in on helping Al Gore.


Hillary's involvement in Washington with the Dean candidacy - Hillary was concerned Dean would win in 2004 - delaying her Presidential campaign to 2012 - and by then the country might be willing to go Republican.


Chris - if you do not know this inside story ask around - Howard Dean was talking about it at the beginning of the Rules Committee meeting - fitting that he was there - clearly stating why he was backing Obama and clearly broadcasting how those votes were going to go that day and why.


Did you catch that at the beginning of the meeting when Dean spoke?

.

Posted by: 37th&OStreet | June 6, 2008 7:48 AM | Report abuse

Chris:


The most important reflection to make on this campaign is this: Hillary did this to herself. Hillary had more than enough people supporting her at one time or another to win the nomination and go on and win in November - but she drove them away.


It started from the first days in 1993.


Hillary went into the White House and was NASTY FROM DAY ONE.


Seriously.


There is a story that there was a list of people waiting for interviews for Presidential appointments - campaign workers and supporters. Hillary went through the list and declared that there were too many "White Males." She ordered hundreds of people CUT from the list based on that criteria - and ordered a search of non-campaign workers and non-supporters to fill minority and women supporters.

hhhhmmmmmmm

Does this sound famiiar? See Hillary CUT her natural supporters and went off in a direction - many of the people they got for those positions had little loyalty to Hillary or the Clintons - they had loyalty to affirmative action. The people who were on the original list were naturally offended and had little reason to completely support the Clintons from that day forward.


Chris if you look back - thousands of Presidential appointments took a long time to fill in 1993 - ask around the news room see if you can get someone to confirm this story.

Hillary continued to conduct herself in a way that did not build support - instead she knew better - she never had a good reputation from the early early days of the campaign - the secret service had secret names for her in 1992.

Hillary decided to run for President in 1998 - from that point it was all about her.


Her support for Al Gore was weak - she stole valuable media time from him in 2000 - and that may have been one major factor why Al Gore did not make it that year.


Hillary was not focused in on helping Al Gore.


Hillary's involvement in Washington with the Dean candidacy - Hillary was concerned Dean would win in 2004 - delaying her Presidential campaign to 2012 - and by then the country might be willing to go Republican.


Chris - if you do not know this inside story ask around - Howard Dean was talking about it at the beginning of the Rules Committee meeting - fitting that he was there - clearly stating why he was backing Obama and clearly broadcasting how those votes were going to go that day and why.


Did you catch that at the beginning of the meeting when Dean spoke?

.

Posted by: 37th&OStreet | June 6, 2008 7:48 AM | Report abuse

Chris

First if you can, review your notes from the DNC Rules Committee meeting last August - see what they were saying and get an idea of how that got out of hand with one campaign turning that issue into something it wasn't or what it Dean?

Posted by: 37th&OStreet | June 6, 2008 7:36 AM | Report abuse

Chris

First if you can, review your notes from the DNC Rules Committee meeting last August - see what they were saying and get an idea of how that got out of hand with one campaign turning that issue into something it wasn't or what it Dean?

Posted by: 37th&OStreet | June 6, 2008 7:36 AM | Report abuse

Chris

First if you can, review your notes from the DNC Rules Committee meeting last August - see what they were saying and get an idea of how that got out of hand with one campaign turning that issue into something it wasn't or what it Dean?

Posted by: 37th&OStreet | June 6, 2008 7:36 AM | Report abuse

Chris

First if you can, review your notes from the DNC Rules Committee meeting last August - see what they were saying and get an idea of how that got out of hand with one campaign turning that issue into something it wasn't or what it Dean?

Posted by: 37th&OStreet | June 6, 2008 7:36 AM | Report abuse

Chris

First if you can, review your notes from the DNC Rules Committee meeting last August - see what they were saying and get an idea of how that got out of hand with one campaign turning that issue into something it wasn't or what it Dean?

Posted by: 37th&OStreet | June 6, 2008 7:36 AM | Report abuse

Monday May 12, 2008: Louisville Kentucky Convention Center

With the crowd stretching around the massive structure on 3 sides, it seemed like my husband and I had had to walk FOREVER to find its end. We had made the trip into the city to hear Sen. Obama as much as a sign of support from us "older, white Kentuckians" in order, we had hoped, to tamp down any false impressions the media had gotten about Obama's "problem" with white working class voters. We had thought there'd be very few people from our demographic. Boy, were we wrong!

The crowd was about evenly mixed, white and African American; old and young; male and female, too.

It was a fairly warm day for us oldersters to stand in line so long but the playfulness (and unabashed joy) of those around us in line continued to grow past its initial tentativeness as time crept slowly on. The last hour was an outright community celebration. But the seemingly "utopian" feel of the gathering wasn't 100% uniform.

There were some African Americans present who weren't open to conversation with those of not from their community. There was a defensiveness - almost a resentment - like we had somehow "crashed" their party. One man particularly stood out for me. At nearly 7 feet tall (I approximate his height based on my husband's height of 6"4), incredibly nattily dressed, a bluetooth in one ear but with his eyes fixed straight ahead, arms folded tightly across his chest and a chin jutting out as far as it could. He'd refused to respond to a hopeful gesture of greeting. OK, I thought, stay clear.

Several hours into our wait, and the line finally began to move. I looked up at my husband and remarked that, if this keeps up, they'll need to hire the crowd-control experts of Disney World! But the line was still incredibly pleasant considering all the time we'd spent standing without shade in the sun.

About 30 minutes later we were finally inside the massive building but once again at a dead halt, the snaking line ahead of us waving at several junctures up the hall and then doubling back upon itself. Suddenly from up behind us came a group of about 50 people - ALL white and fairly young - who'd been misdirected by an Obama volunteer to move up to another point in the line, moving them way up ahead of us. I looked up at my husband in dismay and at the same time caught a glimpse of the expression on the tall black gentleman.

It didn't take a social genius to know that there was going to be trouble...he was MAD.

Not just a quietly simmering kind of anger but a vocal, finger-pointing one.

But then, from just on the other side of him (the line was 3-4 people deep for the most part) I saw the lily-white hand of an older lady (5' tall if she was an inch) lightly rest for an instant on his arm. The gesture got his attention and he looked down but was ready for bear.

With an almost beatific smile, she beamed up at him and asked, "Isn't it a blessing that there are so many people here that we'd have that kind of problem?"

The question seemed to stun the man into a thoughtful silence. I held my breath to see how he'd react.

"Yes it is, ma'am, yes it is," and you could just see his muscles relax.

I don't know about you, Chris. I'm sure you've seen REMARKABLE things in the last few months. But for me, the moment that will ALWAYS stand out was a TINY miracle of (cross-racial, cross-gender and cross-generational) peace.

Posted by: Carmen Cameron | June 6, 2008 5:12 AM | Report abuse

This will seem superficial but you asked for an image/impression. I am an Obama supporter and lost no love on the Clintons and their tactics during the campaign.

Still I was struck several times by what a good-looking woman Hillary is. She has actually become better-looking with age.

I became increasingly mystified as to how she could settle for a sexless or sexually troubled marriage. It seemed like a waste.

Posted by: mruth | June 6, 2008 4:50 AM | Report abuse

Can we refer to the primary season as "The Good, The Bad and the Queen", eh Chris?

I have a couple favorite moments, but they don't revolve around campaign moments per se, but in everyday occurrences. I've never before had so many positive political discussions as this season, with both Obama supporters and from Clinton AND McCain supporters, a credit to the type of campaign the three have run to this point, (with a few exceptions all around). In fact, up until this week, the level of vitriol (on-the-ground-non-media-discussions) seemed relatively low in comparison to '04's anti-Bush and 00's anti-Bill sentiment (and really every presidential election I know of from Nixon on). That's why it makes me sad to see so many posts from Clinton supporters (real or not) with the "I'm not voting Barack" posts when, in many ways, the two dem's platforms are very similar (or at least much more similar than Clinton's and McCain's).

Which shows me the dem's primary wasn't about policy, but about style; Obama's message on working together with all sides of the political spectrum really resonated with those tired of vehemence, whereas Clinton carried that image of a partisan; an effective partisan, no doubt, but a partisan nonetheless. This is irregardless of the media's portrayal of her: her partisan image was built up all through the 90's and didn't start with Chris Matthews and Bill's S.C. comments; sorry Clinton-supporters, Barack Obama is not responsible for her negative public image.

Ultimately, I think the Post's analysis is right on: that Obama's camp ran a smart, solid campaign focused on delegates, ignored states and young people, and Clinton bought into the "coronation" hype and subsequently got sloppy. The election was Clinton's to lose, and she lost it.

So, my favorite moment...I was heading into a store about a month ago. I got out of the car and made my way toward the building. A car was stopped behind mine waiting for another parking spot to open up in a space ahead, and the kid (20-ish) in the passenger seat looked over and saw my Obama sticker. He smiled at me and said "O-Ba-Ma" while raising his fist in support...I decided to mess with him so I said "Oh, that's just my wife's car" and waved my hand dismissingly...I saw him sulk down a bit, then I said "no, I'm just messing with you"...we both got a laugh out of it. To share a bond with a complete stranger over an abstraction (Obama's message of "hope and change") is not something to discount. There's a big difference between a good manager and a good leader. My only hope is those Clinton supporters upset with her loss can in time see it what IS possible with Obama at the helm, vs. what ISN'T under a McCain presidency.

Posted by: jcscott | June 6, 2008 3:25 AM | Report abuse

The moment that made this primary for me was the night that Obama lost in NH and made the "Yes we can" speech.

I was interested before than, but he moved me. Never before has a politician (and Obama is just a politician) touched me before.

The first time I voted was in 1992 and I voted for Perot. 1996 for Perot. 2000 for Nader, 2004 for Nader.

But, after that speech I went online and gave Obama 20 bucks.

If he wins this year, it will be that moment that turned Obama into a movement for me.

Posted by: David | June 6, 2008 1:44 AM | Report abuse

Like an earlier poster, it was the Washington state caucus for me.

My wife has Alzheimers and I'm her full time caregiver. Absolutely HAD to go to caucus, had no one to look after her, so decided to bring her along. Caucus was at a VFW hall, we got there right on time, and found cars parked everywhere, all the way out of the drive and into the street. Inside, the place was packed--no room to move. Obama signs everwhere. I managed to put my name down for Hillary, couldn't stay any longer with my wife.

I was so struck by the organization of the Obama supporters and the lack of any kind of Clinton organizing at all. I had a pretty strong sense that day of how this would turn out.

Posted by: pbearsailor | June 6, 2008 12:26 AM | Report abuse

I remember how I felt after Obama won Iowa. I was gleeful, happy and ecstatic. I hadn't felt that way for a long time on election night. It felt good. I was so excited over the next two nights that I decided that needed to travel from my home in MD to NH. I have two children, 4 and 6, so I took my daughter out of 1st grade for a few days and we were off.

On the ride up we talk about how historical this was. How in our original Constitution women couldn't vote and black people weren't even counted as entire people and could be owned by others as slaves. I told them how this moment in our history proves that anything is possible. That if they have a dream and it seems impossible they should never give up because with hard work, sacrifice and persistence we can change the world into a better place.

I would have like to have volunteered in NH but I thought that wasn't possible with my 2 little children with me. So, we walked around Manchester and saw the news outlets reporting and the different groups of people walking up and down the street chanting for their candidate of choice. My kids loved this it was an amazing adventure for them. They would chant Obama and even got into to a chanting contest with Edwards and Ron Paul supporters on other corners. It seemed good that they engaged because tensions were rising before they started with Obama, Obama. The Ron Paul supports engaged them and tried to change their minds but there was no way that would happen. And the cuteness of a 4 and 6 year old on a snow bank seemed to brighten everyone's day.

At 4:00pm we went to Nashua for Obama's rally that night where a line had already formed. We waited in line for hours. It was great we felt more like we were tailgating without the drinking then waiting in a very long line. During that time we had awesome conversations with those around us. We met older women from CT, college students from NY and Mass, a business women from GA, two other groups of people from MD and a person that was visiting the US from New Zealand and traveled to NH to see Obama. Not all of these people supported Obama some were undecided, but all were open to talking about all sides of politics openly and honestly. It was ok if we disagreed with each other.

We were fortunate to get right up front so the kids could see and they were amazingly good and excited for all of their hours of waiting. It was 7 hours from when we got in line to when he delivered his speech. His speech was amazing and we were moved, energized and excited. In fact, my 4 year old thought he had won until we were in the car driving back to the hotel.

I returned to Maryland ready to work for Obama. I was set up to go canvassing and my husband had a family emergency and had to leave town. I had two choices not go or take the kids with me. I asked them if they would try it and they said yes. I thought it would last only a few hours with them along but I was amazed 5 hours later we had gone to 125 doors. They were so cute and would argue over who got to hang the info on the door if the people weren't home. When we got home I was exhausted I told them next time they could stay home with Daddy. They said "no way we are going and Daddy is coming with us." Since then our family has made over 550 phone calls, canvassed at over 650 doors and even made a trip to Ohio though a snow storm to help out. My 4 and 6 year old have been to most of those doors in cold wet weather and in neighborhoods where even at their young ages, they could recognized the social and racial disparities that exists in our country. One day I asked my 6 year old why she wanted to continue going door to door with me. She said "Mommy we can't make the world a better place if we stay home." And you know what she is right, we can't. This has been an incredible experience.

To keep the kid entertained we made the following videos of them "reporting" from canvassing for Obama and waiting at Obama's rally in Baltimore
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ST_1z5pBh4&eur http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FX6COkC41p4

Posted by: Susan | June 6, 2008 12:24 AM | Report abuse

I enjoyed scrivener's take on the Lieberman confrontation, but we have a technical issue here: does that really count as a primary story when it happened once Obama was nominee? Perhaps the Fix's rules and bylaws committee could tell us.

In the same spirit, I have to give it up for "Lay off my wife" followed by a rare baring-the-teeth, technically-a-smile expression. The Republican Senator from Tennessee issued an appeal to his state party to do the same within hours if not minutes of that moment. A line had been crossed and we all got the message.

This was one of those Rorschach moments. I know some women (mainly Hillary supporters) saw it as sexist. I am a woman but I saw it as GREAT. For two reasons. The first was that it was the absolute anti-Dukakis defining moment. This was not a man who would ever stand at a podium coolly responding to a question about a capital crime being done to his wife.

The second was the mash-up attack video looked like the opening wedge of a line of very personal attack on a candidate's family member, as opposed to, say, a normal critical press release of said person or a dry statement by a spokesman, or an op-ed piece. It seemed meant to evoke personal animosity and it disturbed a lot of us... well, a lot of us who later picked up real fast on Hillary's RFK remark. Any man who wouldn't put a stop to that line of attack (or do the best he could) wouldn't be much of a husband. After all, it's his fight and he got her into it. You better believe he should have her back.

And by the way, to the rest of you with your poorly researched attacks founded on nothing but e-mail smears, wild rumors, and racist whisper campaigns, "Lay off my nominee." Feel free to picture the expression on my face.

Posted by: Fairfax Voter | June 6, 2008 12:11 AM | Report abuse

What I'm reflecting on is how incredibly bad the MSM is and how much what they do is contrary to our interests.

For instance, I'm aware of BHO only being pressed on something by the MSM once (the Rezko-related press conference), but other than that they'd been on their knees.

Unfortunately, regular citizens haven't exactly been picking up the slack either. The only time I'm aware of a regular citizen showing up Obama it was unintentional:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=gGZbgMQZATs

There's also this question he was asked, which begs for a follow-up:

http://lonewacko.com/blog/archives/007602.html

Sometimes I think we might as well establish a dictatorship here, since the vast majority of Americans aren't even willing to ask politicians the questions they need to be asked.

Posted by: LonewackoDotCom | June 5, 2008 11:31 PM | Report abuse

Well, Leon, I asked about mean spirited emails from Obama, not about the whole campaign in general.

This is what you wrote in that long posting.

"When she loaned her campaign 5 Million dollars in early March- it came to me as an e-mail from his campaign first- suggesting mismanagement and lack of popular support."

That's why its good to have examples. I'm sure people will disagree as to whether this is mean-spirited.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 5, 2008 11:31 PM | Report abuse

rjb-
read both books- they are not fully consistent with who he presents himself as now.
Leon

Posted by: Anonymous | June 5, 2008 11:14 PM | Report abuse

DDAWD-

I recently cleaned out my yahoo box of both candidate's messages- but I'll give you an example. When she loaned her campaign 5 Million dollars in early March- it came to me as an e-mail from his campaign first- suggesting mismanagement and lack of popular support. That was example- and there were many. When he had troubles with Rev. Wright- it was not ever in her e-mails. When he sent an advocate to tell the Canadians that it was all just rhetoric- no e-mail, when he said that (white working class) voters had turned to "god and guns" because they were bitter about their situations- and the god and guns part is the bigger part of the quote, explaining how he feels about these voters- no messages directly from her campaign. He, however was credited with running the "higher ground campaign" even as he put out that he was the "change candidate" and she represented the "old ways in DC" (highlight on old) without actually providing any plan or policy that was more ambitious or progressive than hers. To me, the whole basis of his candidacy for many was that he was not her- look at the posts right here on these boards- very little data on why they support Barak, very much data on why they don't like her.

That said, I am supporting him now- but people really need to stop diefying him- it will be very disappointing when it turns out he is a human like the rest of us.

Leon

Posted by: Anonymous | June 5, 2008 11:12 PM | Report abuse

Read or listen to Obama's book. It changes your opinion about him. Most people in his camp and the in the media never bothered to do it.

Posted by: rjb | June 5, 2008 10:48 PM | Report abuse

"Barak's mailing list frequently sent somewhat meanspirited e-mail on the HRC campaign"

I didn't get this impression at all. Got some examples? Maybe we just have different ideas of what constitutes mean spirited.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 5, 2008 10:35 PM | Report abuse

DDAWD- I'm on both mailing lists-

Barak's mailing list frequently sent somewhat meanspirited e-mail on the HRC campaign- while the HRC e-mails focused on her campaigns and policies.

I'm going to have to disagree with most on this being such an awesome political season. Things I will never forget include Chris Matthews saying he feels he should cross his legs when HRC speaks, all the journalists who called her shrill or whiny or power-hungry and manipulative and Donna Brazille- that incompetent evil thing deciding that the word "fairytale" is racist so that Barak could win SC by a larger percentage.

I am a leftist and unlike the Obamites above, I was out there in 2002 marching against the war. I was a Democrat for pragmatic reasons. I will work for and vote for Barak this election but I am done with this ridiculous party.

Leon

Posted by: Anonymous | June 5, 2008 10:32 PM | Report abuse

My favorite moment and longest moment was showing up for my primary in Kansas to lines filling the high school. They expected only a couple hundred and over 2,000 people showed up to vote. While we waited for everyone to get registered to come in there was an open mic bashing of the candidates that started with man who couldn't resist saying "OOOOOBAMA" in the micrphone. We were there for 5 hours when it was supposed to take 1 1/2 hours. But it was worth it!

Posted by: laurenbp | June 5, 2008 10:19 PM | Report abuse

OBAMA GETS ANGRY WITH "LOSERMAN"
...FINALLY SHOWING HIS BEHTZIM
AND IMPRESSING THE MACHO SET

"EMPTY SUIT" STITCHED WITH RAZOR WIRE?

>

The most important political news of the past 24-hour cycle has nothing to do with Hillary Clinton -- it's Barack Obama showing his "behtzim" in a Senate chamber countretemps with the the Benedict Arnold of the Democrats, "If you can't beat 'em join 'em" Joe Lieberman.

As reported in Roll Call, Obama got right up Lieberman's grille, backing Joe into a corner, sternly poking and gesticulating, with both Senators apparently talking over each other's words. This, the fallout from Lieberman's earlier attack on Obama for his stance on Iran, even though Lieberman admitted he hadn't heard Obama's speech before the Israeli lobby group AIPAC.

This tete-a-tete speaks volumes to those who have wondered for months whether Obama can stand up for his beliefs and his positions.. whether he's got the intestinal fortitude to man up when the need arises.

Turns out the "empty suit" might be stitched with threads of razor wire.

Of course, Obama will undo it all if he caves into the pressure to name Hillary as his veepee pick (an unlikely scenario, given the nearly universal condemnation of Hillary's non-concession speech on Tuesday night). The Lieberman episode suggests that Obama's been "baracked" ("blessed" is the English translation) with the stones to stand his ground.

That's been a huge unknown this entire campaign: Whether Obama's usual mild-mannered nature would lead him to be co-opted by the Washington power structure. The Lieberman sturm und drang provides the first clear evidence that Obama has the resolve and the self-confidence to be his own man.

Many, including this writer, still doubt that Obama brings sufficient experience to assume the highest office in the land. But if this "inner John Wayne" emerges as an alter ego to the image of Obama as an effete, latte-sipping elitist, we could see the experience quotient rendered moot by Obama's velvet-clad brass knuckles.

Posted by: scrivener | June 5, 2008 10:04 PM | Report abuse

I stood with my Obama sign at the Springfield Metro stop night after cold, cold February night. (So did many others, on other nights, and probably more often than me. But this is my story.)

A nice man with a New York accent, who I assume was a Clinton supporter since she is his Senator, asked me why in the world I would support Barack Obama. I told him that I am a Democrat, that I saw very few policy differences between them, but I liked Obama's approach more. He smiled and said he was a Democrat, too.

But then he told me that Obama didn't have any policy positions, or at least he hadn't heard of any, and he had been trying to find out about this for weeks. I said, "If you have been trying to find out that kind of information for weeks, why don't you want to take the policy paper I am trying to hand out tonight?" He shook his head, did not take the paper, and went away.

I came back on other nights. The regulars got to know me. Nearly everyone in the crowds of hundreds seemed friendly. Even the McCain supporters liked to see someone was actively volunteering. And we were all excited that now our Virginia primary would actually matter. I never thought of the man again.

The night before the Potomac primay, he suddenly appeared out of the commuting throng. "You're right," he said, as though we had just finished chatting. "I should have taken that from you. Do you have a handout tonight? I'd like to read one."

It's not much of a visual, but that has to be the moment I realized that I really do have the power to make a difference. Thank you, Barack Obama.

Posted by: Fairfax Voter | June 5, 2008 9:59 PM | Report abuse

FAREWELL TO HILLARY

Dear Hillary,

We perfectly understand that, in honor to your political viability, you have to campaign on Obama's behalf. We respect your decision's rationale and commend you for your solid philosophical stand. Furthermore, you are a beautiful woman, smart, well educated, and very attractive. In other words, you do not have any flaw that could prevent us to be your most passionate followers. However, we must not forget that we (your followers) are beings with moral principles as well, and we make decisions accordingly.

Hillary, we've never allowed anyone to use us as accessories to any crime and we are not going to do it now, even if the most beautiful and intelligent woman in the world ask us to do it. We are not going to validate with our sacred votes a piracy act. Our vote in November will be undecided.

Sincerely,

Your Ex-Supporters

OreoBAMA (black outside and white inside) IS NOT THE RIGHT CANDIDATE FOR THIS PARTICULAR ELECTION

Posted by: FAREWELL TO HILLARY | June 5, 2008 9:40 PM | Report abuse

More people got to participate, but that participation and the discussion of policy issues was shallow, so I'm not sure its an unmitigated good.

I think the enduring memory from this campaign will be Hillary's non-concession speech, as a symbol to what her campaign was really about and what Obama overcame.

Posted by: freeDom | June 5, 2008 9:15 PM | Report abuse

I really bought Obama's image at first, but it was shattered when he made a comment that Hillary Clinton must have gained her experience by "osmosis". To me, there is no question that her experience eclipses his and he has since backpedaled furiously on this obvious fact. I was ready to see him challenge her policies and positions on the war, healthcare and education, but was shocked at the ignorance and blatant sexism of the osmosis remark. I was equally shocked when he outed his white grandmother and compared her to Reverend Wright. That brought misogyny to new heights. Now that he has left the church, is he going to disown her too? I clearly remember those moments I began to realize that Obama is no different than any other ambitious, albeit highly packaged, junior senator trying to sell his inexperience as a perk. Under the protective umbrella of being African American he continued to feel entitled to disparage women in the most common and undisguised fashion. So, I can only hope he gets some serious sensitivity training before the general election. I would like not to have to hold my breath in the voting booth when I vote for him.

Posted by: AnyDemWillDo | June 5, 2008 9:15 PM | Report abuse

"If you really think that speech on race was good, you should read it again - read the transcript - see how many contradictions there were."

I've read and watched it several times (hence, quoting it in my papers); it's a great speech, very insightful.

Posted by: SC | June 5, 2008 9:12 PM | Report abuse

January 2007: approx 60 people met at a shopping area in Minneapolis for a visibility event "Walk for Obama". The windchill was near 0 degrees and still we walked up and down the busy streets for 1.5 miles, waving signs and talking to others. Cars honked and people waved, one person driving by held Obama's most recent book up to her car window. My 2 teenage children attended because there was nothing else to do on that cold Saturday in 2007; since then they marched for peace with Obama Minnesota the last 2 years; they attended the caucus and received extra credit at school; they stay up late to watch victory speeches; they begged me to get off work early and let them volunteer last Tuesday at the Xcel Energy Center and stood on the main floor to hear Obama declare "I am the democratic nominee", where the line to get in was almost 2 miles long, but the mood on the streets was happier than Stanley Cup finals; where the 15,000 people who couldn't get in because the X was filled to capacity stood outside to watch the victory speech on the jumbo-tron and were still happy to be there. All for a politician! Amazing!

Posted by: PJ, Stillwater Minnesota | June 5, 2008 9:07 PM | Report abuse

I FEEL YOUR PAIN .......

When you seek old John McCain

As your numbing Novocaine

You may be finally going off track

By closing your minds to Barack

Who is the real cure for your pain!

**************************************************

Keep spewing the venom Hillary supporters ... let it out ... let it all out. God Bless.

Posted by: Orion101 | June 5, 2008 8:31 PM | Report abuse

Sniper fire
Speech on race in America
Speech on religion in America (or, Mormon with a lowercase "M")
Obama Girl
Meghan Mccain's blog
Tears for Fears (in N.H)
Jesse Jackson won South Carolina (but not, of course, in any sort of racial sense)
Flag pin as the Manolo Blahnik (?sp.?) of American politics
Hope and Change as the 2 strongest words

Posted by: medhat | June 5, 2008 8:08 PM | Report abuse

Who can forget the image of Hillary choking up in the New Hampshire restaurant? Her upset victory in the Granite State was the first time a woman ever won a presidential primary in the United States. And it turned out that, because of her victory there, Obama was forced to compete for 5 months and endure a crucible-like process which made him a far stronger and more electable candidate. If Hillary's emotional moment reversed her fortunes in New Hampshire, it also turned out to be a blessing in disguise for Obama.

Posted by: harlemboy | June 5, 2008 7:58 PM | Report abuse

Thank you Trolling Anonymous! This may be my record: The most times I've posted to a Fix blog AND most times I've been mentioned in other people's posts!

Does it still count even though you're too lame to give your name and you just copy and paste?

Yes it does! Because I use "Clinton Math"... the math for people who don't follow rules.

Posted by: egc52556 | June 5, 2008 7:55 PM | Report abuse

SC


If you really think that speech on race was good, you should read it again - read the transcript - see how many contradictions there were.

THEN compare that to Obama's backing off of Rev. Wright a month later


Obama basically said his speech in Philadelphia was rubbish and he made a mistake with the speech.


Read it, you will be amazed.


.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 5, 2008 7:52 PM | Report abuse

egc52556


You really should keep on going, because Obama is no good


Posted by: Anonymous | June 5, 2008 7:50 PM | Report abuse

egc52556


You really should keep on going, because Obama is no good


Posted by: Anonymous | June 5, 2008 7:50 PM | Report abuse

Whoever wrote this is correct:

"My lasting memory is right after Super Tuesday. The biased media acting like FL and MI don't exist. My jaw drops to the floor, they are discussing this like there are only 48 states?! Taking our delegates right off the score board, I watched in anger the entire time. I wondered? are they stupid? are they doing this on purpose to favor Obama?"


100% CORRECT - ACCORDING TO ROB JOHNSON AT THE DNC RULES COMMITTEE THEY DECIDED TO STOP MICHIGAN AND FLORIDA FROM VOTING EARLY BECAUSE THOSE TWO STATES WERE "TOO WHITE" -


SOUTH CAROLINA WAS DEEMED TO BE BLACK ENOUGH


NEVADA WAS DEEMED TO BE HISPANIC ENOUGH


SO SOUTH CAROLINA AND NEVADA VOTERS WERE FAVORED BECAUSE OF THEIR BLACK AND HISPANIC POPULATIONS.

NOOOOO THAT IS NOT DISCRIMINATION AGAINST WHITES NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO


.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 5, 2008 7:46 PM | Report abuse

My 2nd greatest memory of the campaign was winning a Fix T-Shirt for my contribution to "FixCam: The Campaign That Was..."

(* hint , hint *)

Posted by: egc52556 | June 5, 2008 7:38 PM | Report abuse

"My lasting memory is right after Super Tuesday. The biased media acting like FL and MI don't exist. My jaw drops to the floor, they are discussing this like there are only 48 states?! Taking our delegates right off the score board, I watched in anger the entire time. I wondered? are they stupid? are they doing this on purpose to favor Obama?"

No, they were doing it because Michigan and Florida's delegates were disqualified because they broke the rules; in order to calm things down, they later modified the ruling a bit and gave them half-votes (and, in Michigan's case, since the election was irredeemably flawed, came up with a compromise delegate apportionment). Thus, at the time, they were meaningless to determine the Democratic nominee.

Obama's big speech on race was the highlight of the campaign for me; a magnificent piece of work, one of the most significant and bravest speechs given by any politician in a long time. A couple of weeks later, I used some quotes from it in one of my English papers.

Posted by: SC | June 5, 2008 7:29 PM | Report abuse

This is my favorite moment:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rhPxSm9Es0w

Posted by: piktor | June 5, 2008 7:28 PM | Report abuse

June 2006 (That's "six", Fix, not a typo): Barack Obama spoke at Call to Renewal's "Building a Covenant for a New America" conference. I had been reading Jim Wallis' excellent book, "God's Politics". When I read about Obama at the conference, I first realized he might be a candidate I was sort-of looking for and one we hadn't seen in a while: a liberal Democrat who could speak openly about religion without wincing.

That was my first inkling that Obama might not only be "a" candidate, but "my" candidate.

See http://blogs.suntimes.com/sweet/2006/06/obama_on_faith_and_politics_an.html

Peace.

Posted by: egc52556 | June 5, 2008 7:23 PM | Report abuse

February 10. 2008. When I started out for Blacksburg last night, I did what I usually do, left some lights on, and of course I have no curtains at my windows yet, having just moved into my new place in December. When I pulled away from home, I admired the glow of the windows and thought of the cats already napping on the bed.

I got to Blacksburg in plenty of time for the 8:00 starting time of Bill Clinton's appearance for Hillary. I parked in the wrong place, grabbing something just because it was there, even though it was a mile from where the meeting would be. I was in the parking lot of The Inn at Virginia Tech. I left my car unlocked, as usual--we do that in small towns. The innkeeper arranged a van ride for me to the event site, and there reality began to dawn. At 7:45 there were hundreds and hundreds of people in a line--2 and 3 abreast--that curled around the building twice! At least 90 percent of those waiting were students. We waited, moving up several paces every 10 minutes or so. The boys behind me were barefoot, in spite of the 29-degree temperature. I had left my hat and gloves at home, believing I would just park and hop into the auditorium! I had my Scottish wool scarf that helped a lot, and a warm sweater and pants. At 8:30 a campaign worker came up and down the line to announce that the gym would hold only 2600 people; the 2601st and the rest would be in a second gym with a huge closed circuit television. It was clear she was talking to us. We waited some more, and I began to calculate when the thing would actually start and think about my unlocked car, my uncurtained house, and my cats waiting for me. I was going to be gone only a little while, you see. I now thought I would be lucky to be home by midnight. At that point I didn't think I would get in at all.

I spent 20 years working on Capitol Hill from 1971 to 1992--10 Congresses, rubbing shoulders with the mighty, and the not-so-important, including Hillary Rodham, my workmate for 9 months in 1974--we were both on the House Judiciary Impeachment Inquiry staff. She introduced her boyfriend to all of us at the reunion picnic several months after President Nixon resigned. My loyalty of all those years would impress no one. And the idea of watching Bill on closed circuit TV rankled somewhat. I'd seen him lots of times in person.

The wind came up and cut across the open campus--I couldn't feel my face. I gave up and began walking back to where I had parked my car. I was halted at an intersection by a police car intermittently whooping its siren. I knew right away that it must be the motorcade. They stopped at the intersection, and the third vehicle was 3 feet away from me. It was a small van with an overhead light illuminating the silver head of President Clinton. I saw him so clearly! I waved, but he didn't see me.

Back in my car, at 9:10, when my face began to thaw, I used it to laugh and laugh and laugh.

Nancy Brooks
Wytheville, Virginia

Posted by: Nancy Brooks | June 5, 2008 7:22 PM | Report abuse

The most memorable moment for me was the speech Obama made after his South Caroline. I watched it on television with tears streaming down my face, I'm proud to say I voted form him in the NJ primary and look forward to ensuring that he wins in Nov.

Posted by: Roger | June 5, 2008 7:13 PM | Report abuse

Mitt Romney's "Faith in America" speech.

It summed up the entire race on the Republican side.

Posted by: Mark | June 5, 2008 6:47 PM | Report abuse

1) Seeing Obama in person in New Orleans. He supplanted Bill Clinton, who I saw in 1998, as the best political speech I have been in the presence of. I had already decided to vote for him, not out of a strong preference, but simply for electability. At that time, I still had a strong affection for Hillary. But Obama's speech was just amazing. He was being hammered as someone who does not understand reality. At the end of his speech, he just shot that premise down. To have hope does not mean to lack a sense of reality. You want the best and you've got to fight for it. I was very skeptical of him at the start, but that just melted away. It got me to volunteer politically for the first time which was a fun experience in itself.

(incidentally, I saw Bill Clinton a month later. It was about his charity work. Also a very good talk. I'm glad I got to wipe away some of the negative feelings I was developing towards him)

2) Obama's North Carolina victory speech. This was a huge win after getting hammered for two months. There was something different. He seemed so hardened and weary, but battle tested. That was when I realized that he knows how to fight.

3) Clinton's evolution. It was amazing to see her go from a wonky analyst to someone who could really connect with people. Unfortunately, all her speeches were marred by this intellectual dishonesty about popular votes and such. Also, the begging for money got old. I lost a lot of respect for Clinton through the primary, but I did grow to admire her supporters and I do feel bad for them. (not those obnoxious ones who felt the need to make a scene at the R+B meeting, though)

4) Stumping for Obama in the streets of New Orleans. I had never done anything like that before. It was great. Talked to all sorts of people. Hillary supporters, McCain supporters. I had to explain to a couple of little kids that the picture on my pamphlets wasn't Martin Luther King. Got into a few debates about Obama vs McCain. (not that many Hillary lovers out there. She should have campaigned there) It's a good experience. Everyone should do it.

Incidentally, I think that's one of the reasons college kids like Obama. He wanted more than money. He would take your support in any way possible. Of course, most of his emails asked for money, but he also emailed phone lists and names of people to get in touch with. What impressed me the most was a few emails that encouraged people to get out and become community organizers and instructions on how to do it. College kids don't have money, but they do have energy. This sort of thing appeals to them.

I don't have any comparison with Clinton since I wasn't on her mailing list. I get the impression that it was all about money with her. Is this the case? I'd like to know even if I'm wrong.

But it was an amazing experience. Unfortunately, it came down to a crawl at the end. It's like a basketball championship in which one team dominates at the end, but the other team starts fouling with three minutes to go. It's agonizingly dull, but its the championship, so you've got to watch.

But the game is finally over and wow, it feels good. Time to get geared up for the next battle.

Posted by: DDAWD | June 5, 2008 6:43 PM | Report abuse

I guess seeing Hillary in person in Boca and thinking to myself what an awful person she looked like. In person she is down right scary, one freighting looking creature. They do wonders with her when she is on TV.

Posted by: Anonymous | June 5, 2008 6:19 PM | Report abuse

The Washington (state) caucuses --

In 2004 I was precinct committee chair for my Kitsap Peninsula precinct, as well as part of a small group pushing for General Clark. In spite of the heated and far from settled contest, my precinct drew fewer than 25 voters and there was quite a bit of arm twisting involved in getting backers of most candiates (other than the eager Kuchinistas) to be delegates to the county convention.

In 2008 the caucuses for much of north Kitsap County were held in our new high school. Chaos. Hundreds crowding in, trying to find where their precinct was meeting. My precinct drew about a hundred -- overwhelmingly for Obama. We had a competitive election for Obama delegates to the county convention. The Clinton backers also had a competitive election. My wife got (barely) one of the delegate slots. When she got to the county convention practically everyone wanted to be a delgate to the state convention (unlike 2004).

Democracy in action -- glad I live in a caucus state.

Posted by: Kit Taylor | June 5, 2008 6:10 PM | Report abuse

That tie is BANGIN'!

Posted by: Z | June 5, 2008 6:06 PM | Report abuse

I am a registered republican in Omaha, Nebraska. I voted for Bush in 2000, but Kerry in 2004. The most memorable thing for me was actually seeing Barack Obama in person. After the rally, I had a chance to shake his hand and thank him for coming to Omaha. This has been an amazing year that had Democrats campaigning in Omaha in February and my hometown of Rapid City, South Dakota this week. Both of these states are traditionally republican strongholds, but I can see a change coming on the horizon. I think I will support Obama over McCain this fall. Since Nebraska is one of the few states that split Electoral College votes, I hope Senator Obama does receive the support in NE-02. Some people talk about Omaha being a potentially decisive place this fall. I don't believe it. I think Obama will do very well in many former red states and will enjoy a comfortable win.

Posted by: Omaha Republicans for Obama | June 5, 2008 5:50 PM | Report abuse

What sticks in my mind is the sexist remarks reported by the media. Also, the favoritism for Obama in the media and the DNC. I am now backing McCain. Yep, I'm one of those women who said that if Obama was nominated, I would support John McCain. I am tired of the media making news instead of reporting it and disgusted with the way they handled it this election primary season.

We need to wake up and realize how influencial the media is and stop them in their tracks.

Posted by: N. Lee | June 5, 2008 5:41 PM | Report abuse

Josh


Yes, it is just that rudeness from Obama which caused Hillary not to pick up the phone the other night


Obama is not going to get much from Hillary


No one is going to forget the South Carolina smear of Bill Clinton


Obama did this to himself


Posted by: Anonymous | June 5, 2008 5:40 PM | Report abuse

Josh


Yes, it is just that rudeness from Obama which caused Hillary not to pick up the phone the other night


Obama is not going to get much from Hillary


No one is going to forget the South Carolina smear of Bill Clinton


Obama did this to himself


Posted by: Anonymous | June 5, 2008 5:40 PM | Report abuse

My favorite moment, other than when Ollberman told Matthews to settle down after he felt a shock in his leg, would be when Clinton refused to even acknowledge her losses during February, and when she went to speak after one of those primary days (I can't remember which) and Obama came out and began to speak in the middle of her speech and all the networks cut away - it was beautiful.

Posted by: Josh | June 5, 2008 5:26 PM | Report abuse

Mr Obama is wasting nom time changing his position to a more palatable general election theme. There's beginning to be a startling disconnect between his previous statements and more recent ones. Not suprising.

e.g. Yesterday, Obama pledged to "never compromise when it comes to Israel's security", but, oddly enough, he was one of only a handful of Senators that did not support last year's Kyl-Lieberman amendment, which designated the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps as a foreign terrorist organization.

Even the Senate's other most liberal members -- Dick Durbin, Chuck Schumer, Hillary Clinton -- voted for the amendment -- but not Obama.

In a debate last year, Obama called it "saber-rattling" but in yesterday's speech he backtracked by saying we should boycott "firms associated with the Iranian Revolutionary Guard, whose Quds force has rightly been labeled a terrorist organization."

McCain said he was not surprised by the sudden change in direction, noting that Obama often switches on issues. This one, though, was particularly "remarkable."


Another in a long string of waffles for the freshman.

Posted by: proudtobeGOP | June 5, 2008 5:26 PM | Report abuse

This is the poll (see below) I have been waiting for since the campaign started. Why in the world didn't the Clinton campaign run their own poll months ago... with Clinton as Pres. and Obama as VP. If the numbers were in her favor it would immediately position that as the best ticket against McCain... even if Obama had more delegates. Really a lost opportunity. Here is the Gallop poll:

A slight majority of Democrats (52%) say that Barack Obama should choose Hillary Clinton as his Democratic running mate. Further, a hypothetical Obama-Clinton ticket leads John McCain 50% to 45%, while a matchup that does not mention her results in a tie.
Read more at GALLUP.com.

Posted by: Jersey John | June 5, 2008 5:21 PM | Report abuse

This is a no-brainer for me...Joe Biden cranking out "There's only three things he(Giuliani) mentions in a sentence: a noun, and a verb and 9/11." The best line of the whole political season!

Posted by: James McLeod | June 5, 2008 5:09 PM | Report abuse

My lasting memory is right after Super Tuesday. The biased media acting like FL and MI don't exist. My jaw drops to the floor, they are discussing this like there are only 48 states?! Taking our delegates right off the score board, I watched in anger the entire time. I wondered? are they stupid? are they doing this on purpose to favor Obama? Well as the months went by I got my answer. The media worshipped Obama and hated Clinton. I can't even fathom why Clinton would be hated and as of yet no one has provided a reason to hate her. So I assume it is because she is a woman. Even more strange was the fact that Obama is unelectable. Am I the only person who can so plainly see this? Again, is the media that dumb?

Why is the media so afraid of stating that when 90% of blacks vote for Obama that they are being racists? Another oddity. This worried me, blacks vote for the black candidate despite all of the Civil Rights efforts by the Clintons for blacks. Obama gets young naive voters and racist black voters...not good. Yet when a white person votes for the qualified candidate (Clinton), the media talks of "white racism". (sigh)

I then watched Kerry, the DNC officials, Kennedy, Edwards, all stab Clinton in the back. I then watched them all try and push her out of finishing a race she kept winning. I wondered..."what the **** is going on!?" Are they trying to hand the Presidency to McCain? UTTERLY DISRESECTFUL TO THE 18 MIL THAT VOTED FOR CLINTON and no one will forget this at the voting booth.

I remember the moment I saw the tacky stunt of Edwards endorsing Obama right after Clintons landslide win in WV, that Obama would lose the nomination. Somehow it will happen, Obama will not get enough votes in August to win. The Obama audience actually booed Clinton and Obama's fate was sealed. Radical hateful supporters back the Obama candidate, he is not electable.

Being the justice oriented and suspicious person that I am (yes, that's why I am a Democrat), I decided to vote against Obama so that the forces behind the Obama bias will learn that they can't get away with such shenanigans, (among many other reasons I would never vote for Obama). The media gave Obama a free ticket, and gave Clinton a kick in the head. Always suspect the candidate getting way too much favoritism. Something's up involving big money/favors and many voters spotted it, enough voters spotted it to keep Obama out of the White House.

Posted by: Sal | June 5, 2008 5:03 PM | Report abuse

What is burned into my mind is the brave then First Lady Hillary Clinton, braving sniper fire at a hostile forward airbase in the former Yugoslavia, hunkered down with the intrepid Chelsea, Sinbad, and Sheryl Crow.

What? That never happened? I wonder where I got that from.

Posted by: bondjedi | June 5, 2008 4:59 PM | Report abuse

Fix,
As a Nashua resident, I was at that rally you refer to, and I couldn't agree with you more. Not only was Obama fantastic, but it was great to see so many people getting involved. I worked as an election worker just a few days later, and we had lines out the door! 400 people came to register to vote in Ward 3, which is remarkable when one realizes there were only about 2000 people on the rolls before that. And most of the new voters were youngsters--25 and under. A great thing for democracy!

Posted by: Henry | June 5, 2008 4:53 PM | Report abuse

Attending my Precinct Convention with 400 other folks - all ages, all ethnicities, lining up like a double coiled snake for hours in the halls of the Northwest YMCA in Austin. The precinct went 2-1 BHO but everybody was friendly, joking, having a good ole' time. The actual meeting when we got in to the gym, was cordial, fair, and somewhat interesting on ethnic lines. Anglo younger than 45 were heavily BHO, Hispanics under 30 were all BHO, Asians were all HRC, blacks were 13/17 BHO [I counted both lines at registration] and one very elderly anglo couple both in motorized chairs were patient in the BHO line for hours. Never a harsh word. We elected as precinct parliamentarian an HRC delegate - a woman who is an assistant AG in the election division who joked she could not get caught cheating or she would lose her career. We finally convinced the hundreds who had never come to a precinct convention before to table the 57 resolutions that always range from the ridiculous to the sublime ['free Red China", "legalize pot", make some day a state holiday for some reason, - people make up stuff]. Debate of 57 resolutions begun at 10:15P would have gone into Thursday, if we had not prevailed on the critical "Motion to Table".
--------------------------
Alan in Missoula and blert -
pls contact me at
mark_in_austin@operamail.com
.

Posted by: MarkInAustin | June 5, 2008 4:52 PM | Report abuse

What sticks with me is this overall feeling of negativity whenever I heard Sen. Clinton; that and a steady decline in my respect for President Clinton.

Posted by: Soonerthought | June 5, 2008 4:45 PM | Report abuse

The NH speech was momentous. All the elements were there, including the inviting the local organizers up and thanking them. It's the ground organization, rather than the top down management, that carried the day. More than a million and half small donors in the PRIMARY! An American President, unbeholden to the mega donor/bundlers..that's change we CAN believe in!

Posted by: thebob.bob | June 5, 2008 4:38 PM | Report abuse

The coolest moment for me was the day that Obama and Clinton debated in Austin. After a couple of weeks of failing in all my attempts to actually get inside the debate, I opted to watch the debate live at a watch party in the Student Union. Here, too; the line stretched around the corner and about as far as I could see, and people had to be turned away. Turned away just to watch a television showing.

(ok, I guess Chelsea Clinton was supposed to show up. But she didn't and I don't think that was the top motivation for most attendees.)

Posted by: Michael Hurta | June 5, 2008 4:20 PM | Report abuse

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