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The Hyper-Localism of VA and NJ



Gov. Jon Corzine (D-N.J.) and state Sen. Creigh Deeds (D-Va.). Photos by Chris Hondros/Getty Images and Bob Brown of AP Photo/Richmond Times-Dispatch

The gubernatorial races this fall in Virginia and New Jersey -- long cast as a national referendum on the early days of Barack Obama's presidency -- are instead turning on the most local of issues as each contest enters the final stretch.

In New Jersey, former U.S. Attorney Chris Christie (R) has been on the receiving end of a series of tough stories over the past few weeks -- from a personal loan he gave a one-time co-worker to a traffic incident in which he hit a motorcyclist but did not receive a ticket.

In Virginia, meanwhile, former state Attorney General Bob McDonnell's (R) campaign has been forced to play defense after a master's thesis he wrote at Regent's University, which espouses a series of controversial social positions.

These most local of developments, Democrats argue, have changed the momentum in both races, which -- as recently as this summer -- looked like two pickups for Republicans. (Worth noting: Polling done in each state has yet to reflect that switch in momentum.)

If Democrats can come back to hold onto one -- or even both -- of the governor's races up for grabs this November, it will almost certainly be cast as a boost to Obama, whose own numbers have languished in recent months.

But should it? Almost certainly not.

While Obama has made stops in each state for Gov. Jon Corzine (N.J.) and state Sen. Creigh Deeds (D-Va.), he has been far from a ubiquitous presence in either race. (The White House is always careful to protect the Obama brand -- never wanting him to be too closely associated with a defeat.)

Off-year elections are --inevitably -- taken as indicators of political trends to come. All political observers are haunted by not seeing the 1993 Republican victories in New Jersey and Virginia as a precursor to the 1994 Republican wave. But, off year election are as often localized affairs with few national implications as they are nationalized contests that tell us something significant about the mood of the electorate.

Put simply: Be careful reading too much into the results in Virginia and New Jersey -- no matter who wins. All politics is local, after all.

By Chris Cillizza  |  September 9, 2009; 10:25 AM ET
Categories:  Governors  
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Comments

That's a good idea, funny part is I actually don't own a handgun, or any firearm for that matter, but at least I know I have the right to if I choose.

==

Please explain what gives you any idea that I regard owning a bleedin' firearm as relevant to freedom.

You can have your RKBA, I'd trade every one of you guys for a free press again.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | September 9, 2009 10:06 PM | Report abuse

McDonnell and Toomey are playing the same game.
Their positions are well established by voting records that support the Conservative's "Our Family Values are the ones the Count" agenda; low taxes that limit the size of government; elimination of federal oversight and regulation of industry and business; free markets running free.
They are proud to be considered a conservative's conservative while they are running in primaries and raising funds.

Immediately they have to start campaigning to the general public they tout how moderate they are and say nice things about the President. They are, of course, lying about themselves and their leadership plan. McDonnell gets caught with a 15 point action plan "welfare policy" and he back pedals like mad, but he had already put forward legislation for 10 of his points. Toomey is all smiley about Obama, but he has spent the last few years putting forward the avidly pro-business agenda of the Club for Growth. They still haven't been able to elect a state-wide candidate.

The voters are not ready to hand the future of their country over to Regent University or Club for Growth, and these two are elbows deep in these organizations.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | September 9, 2009 7:32 PM | Report abuse

That's a good idea, funny part is I actually don't own a handgun, or any firearm for that matter, but at least I know I have the right to if I choose.

mtcooley, the fundamental truth here is if the blue dogs get in line, you have more than enough votes in both houses to pass it. Actually you only need 85% of the democrats in both houses assuming you use reconciliation in the senate. You probably will have Snowe and Collins helping in some kind of capacity. I'm thrilled that the blue dogs are actually listening to their consituents because they are the only dems who could actually lose their seat, but there still are more than enough democrats to overcome the blue dogs if need be. I am glad the tea party movement has made members of congress uncomfortable. It still doesn't change the fact that there are large democratic majorities in both houses and if they want to pass it, they can. I wouldn't called it voter intimidation. I call it voters exercising their first amendment rights. I can't make a member of congress vote one way or another, but I can volunteer and donate money to his or her opponent-it's called democratic elections.

Posted by: TexasProud1 | September 9, 2009 5:30 PM | Report abuse

you haven't said anything other than standard liberal talking points,

==

Only problem with this is that there is nothing I read that would feed me those points. I've never been to HuffPost or MoveOn or any of those sites you guys are always screeching about.

Now why don't you go fawn over your handguns.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | September 9, 2009 4:54 PM | Report abuse

>>The Republicans can scream till they are blue in the face, but they can't do squat to stop anything unless a significant portion of the democratic members of congress help.

So.........I think someone hasn't been paying attention to the news of late. They have effectively been killing the bills in their various incarnations.

The Republicans have shown, at least to me, by rallying the base they can kill support by causing many of the blue dogs to be afraid of towing the party line. I think their screaming has worked rather well as a matter of fact. They don't need their help to do it. They just need to make the people in the purple worry enough not to act for fear of losing support.

It does however put a new spin on 'voter intimidation'

Posted by: mtcooley | September 9, 2009 4:54 PM | Report abuse

Honestly Gold,

you haven't said anything other than standard liberal talking points, but realistically neither one of us is going to change each other's minds. If you want me to rag on the McCain campaign, i can rattle off a few things, but the point is-while you lose your temper questioning my honesty, you might want to ask yourself why Obama has lost 15% on his approval rating. Why his party can't pass his utopian health care bill even though they have 60% of both houses under their control. The Republicans can scream till they are blue in the face, but they can't do squat to stop anything unless a significant portion of the democratic members of congress help.

Posted by: TexasProud1 | September 9, 2009 4:42 PM | Report abuse

"pea-sized brains of the leftist morons"

I call abuse. And Zouk. But then again, I'm being redundant.

==

"vomit on the sidewalk"

You must be the only regular here who reads his posts.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | September 9, 2009 4:16 PM | Report abuse

In a great irony, it was McDonnell himself who called attention to the thesis. A Post reporter looked it up and, well, reported on what was in it. You'd think that Republicans around here would support a social conservative. Guess not.

"pea-sized brains of the leftist morons"

I call abuse. And Zouk. But then again, I'm being redundant.

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | September 9, 2009 3:49 PM | Report abuse

Yes the MSM has a liberal bias. MSNBC ran the caption of breaking news when Palin was nominated of how many houses the McCain-Palin ticket had. If you wanted to McCain choose conservative pro-life governor or something on those lines, but the house thing was a cheap shot.

==

You sound like you need a hanky.

That "liberal bias" didn't show up when for eight years the media reported White House press releases about Iraq as straight news, nor when "terror alerts" were issued every time Bush's approval took a hit and nothing had actually happened to indicate a real threat.

McCain ran as a straight-talking man of the people and all the while he's so awash in wealth he doesn't know how many houses he owns? That's one f*ck less of a cheap shot than three months of Reverend Wright.

You're reflexively dishonest, and it's getting old.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | September 9, 2009 3:46 PM | Report abuse

I know we have elected people of questionable character-OF BOTH PARTIES. The point I am trying to make is that if McDonnell is who you are making him out to be-he isn't going to win-but then again he wouldn't have won AG 4 years ago either. I don't anything about Deeds except he supports abortion and he isn't McDonnell since that's what he has been campaigning on. The most ironic thing about this entire race is that it involves the same guy who lost to him 4 years ago. You would have thought he would have done his research then. If his transportation positions are that bad, then I doubt he'll get elected. Yes the MSM has a liberal bias. MSNBC ran the caption of breaking news when Palin was nominated of how many houses the McCain-Palin ticket had. If you wanted to McCain choose conservative pro-life governor or something on those lines, but the house thing was a cheap shot. Washington Post ran the macaca story ad naseum in '06 to take down George Allen. Granted it was something stupid, but Jim Webb had just as many, if not more, examples of, we'll call it 'controversial' statements. I didn't hear a peep out of Washington Post or the NYT about the Van Jones episode. You throw in the forged documents Mary Mapes, who now is with the Huffington Post, was peddling at CBS in '04 and it's no wonder the majority of people in this country believe in a bias.

Posted by: TexasProud1 | September 9, 2009 3:38 PM | Report abuse

The whole point I am making is, if he is what you claim he is, he isn't going to win, and he never would have won AG, and he probably would have never won a state legislative seat either.

==

Why? Because there's some magical connection between a man's inner character and winning elections? Because God controls electoral outcomes?

Or is it "the marketplace?"

What a load of illiterate logic.

The connection between character and electoral victory is -- you ready? -- information. The voters didn't have the information about McD's knucklewalking social conservative views when he ran for AG. They have them now, and it's hurting him bad, which is why you're reduced to quoting Rasmussen polls and baiting the readers with insulting crap about flailing arms.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | September 9, 2009 3:35 PM | Report abuse

>>Honestly, this is cracking me up. I guess that's the point of the comment section. The whole point I am making is, if he is what you claim he is, he isn't going to win, and he never would have won AG, and he probably would have never won a state legislative seat either.

Because winning is the ulitmate validation of a man's character and if he wins he can't be a bad guy. We have never elected people of questionable morals or ideas ever?

Jeez cognative dissodence abounds today. I mean seriously winning is what validates him as an okay guy. Not what he says or the agenda (which apparently has been along his social conservative extreme slant) he is pushing. Glad to know that's what we should be basing decisions on! I think we've cleared up why these kinds of guys get into office.

>> I can promise you the Washington Post, New York Times, MSNBC will do everything in their power to make this guy look like the Spanish Inquisition.
I don't think you have that quite right. I think you mean the media is the Inqusition. As they were the aggressive and persecuting party, which is what the media should be doing to safeguard the voters of VA. Your arguments about him being full of ideas on transportation are kind of fizzling when we find out what they are and how they are just going to make them worse.

Not that Deeds has anything else to offer but you shouldn't take bad ideas that would cripple an already hurting agency because no one else is offering. You do have to be a little bit choosy and make sure they're not crackpot ones.

Posted by: mtcooley | September 9, 2009 3:22 PM | Report abuse

I can promise you the Washington Post, New York Times, MSNBC will do everything in their power to make this guy look like the Spanish Inquisition.

==

All anyone needs to do is report McDonnell's own words.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | September 9, 2009 3:17 PM | Report abuse

amazing someone can still beleive the liberal media myth, when the MSM has been trying so hard all these years to prop up incompetent and loony repulicans.

Posted by: drindl | September 9, 2009 3:09 PM | Report abuse

Honestly, this is cracking me up. I guess that's the point of the comment section. The whole point I am making is, if he is what you claim he is, he isn't going to win, and he never would have won AG, and he probably would have never won a state legislative seat either. The 'flailing the arms' comment is about the fact that people are using unnecessary heated rhetoric as if that is going to change people's minds. I can promise you the Washington Post, New York Times, MSNBC will do everything in their power to make this guy look like the Spanish Inquisition.

Posted by: TexasProud1 | September 9, 2009 3:05 PM | Report abuse

If that is true, he wouldn't be getting 40% of the vote, much less be ahead by 8-12 points. The whole point is if you continue to flail your arms in the air, and scream at the top of your lungs that he's a neanderthal, you will only make yourself look less credible. If McDonnell is who you say he is, he wouldn't be where he is today. He wouldn't have won multiple terms in the state legislature, he wouldn't have won Attorney General.

==

The only one flailing his arms here is you. Quit this baiting BS about flailing arms and screaming at the top of lungs, you only make yourself look less credible.

Your logic is all screwed up. If his troglodyte writings had been revealed earlier he wouldn't be Attorney General, he'd be driving a forklift.

It's not a question of "who I say he is," that's just more flailing and yelling at the top of lungs.

It's his own words, his own beliefs, his own legislative attempts to get his abhorrent beliefs into law.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | September 9, 2009 2:59 PM | Report abuse

McDonnell got where he is by running conservative in a conservative district. He was a good fit for attorney general--everyone wants *current* laws enforced. And his resume made it easy to get the GOP nomination from the base.

Now the rest of Virginians, many of which have never voted for him, need to take a fresh look.

Posted by: mikeinmidland | September 9, 2009 2:57 PM | Report abuse

Goldandtanzinite,

If that is true, he wouldn't be getting 40% of the vote, much less be ahead by 8-12 points. The whole point is if you continue to flail your arms in the air, and scream at the top of your lungs that he's a neanderthal, you will only make yourself look less credible. If McDonnell is who you say he is, he wouldn't be where he is today. He wouldn't have won multiple terms in the state legislature, he wouldn't have won Attorney General.

Posted by: TexasProud1 | September 9, 2009 2:45 PM | Report abuse

It all depends on what people believe is relevant. Getting riled up and flailing your arms about this 'crazy bible-thumping, exorcism-performing' caricature is not going to help you.

==

It's not a caricature, it's an accurate reading of the man's own words and his public record. He has ideas about women and families that belong in medieval times.

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | September 9, 2009 2:35 PM | Report abuse

Yes who you associate does reflect who you are as a person. Yes I am sure I know people who, if i was a candidate for public office, would be used against me. For most people, it's called a church, but for some people on the board they would be 'religious wing-nuts.' The real question is do the people who have a vote in the race think it's relevant or not. It didn't prove fatal to Obama. Jim Webb and Al Franken had some writings that some people found offensive, they still won. It all depends on what people believe is relevant. Getting riled up and flailing your arms about this 'crazy bible-thumping, exorcism-performing' caricature is not going to help you. He's been VA Attorney General the last 4 years-Virginians have a better idea of who he is and how he fits into the picture.

Posted by: TexasProud1 | September 9, 2009 2:31 PM | Report abuse

drindl: Jesus you really don't want to let that guy near VADOT. Seriously look at some of the other DOT's in trouble and the first thing you'll find in common is the issuing of bonds they couldn't pay.

Toll roads should not be converted but new construction because otherwise you're never going to make the money back. Refusing to raise the gas tax is about as messed up as they come when you get to transportation funding.

Deeds may not have any ideas but McDonnell is just spouting nonsense. I don't know how much of the problems with VADOT's budget is internal but that's typically the first place you start to fix the problems anyway. You start with restructuring and you don't start massive financing barring some kind of emergency construction need. He also seems to think this is some kind of massive fix. It takes years to realign DOT's with budget issues. You'd be looking at a few years of belt tightening.

Posted by: mtcooley | September 9, 2009 2:01 PM | Report abuse

>>You say those guys are irrelevant, but yet it reflects the type of people Obama lets himself be around.

I hope you're never judge by the company you've kept your entire life? I'm sure there are plenty of people in there that would make you look equally bad. Do you interact with nothing but like minded individuals of the same background and breeding?

The guilt by association is just the lazy man's way out of dealing with someone he doesn't like. It's small town gossip. X person is 'friends' with Y. Doesn't matter what the actual relationship is, just what you can imply. Judge the man for what he says and does; the company you keep doesn't ever tell the whole story.

>>Sure things can change, but trying to play up conservative social stances in a battleground electorate isn't the best approach. It would work better in NJ where the electorate is more noticeably liberal.

I live in a hugely conservative area. Those aren't normal stances by any stretch of the imagination. The ones on cohabitating and homosexuality are closer to normal conservative where I live which is the deep south. Telling married couples not to use birth control or that day care is bad? That's really kind of messed up. It's a legitimate concern as to how seriously he might persue parts of it. I don't care if he's the most fiscally conservative man on the planet, you'd be voting someone in that has some whacked out views on family. It'd be the same if he was at the opposite end of the spectrum for a lot of people.

Posted by: mtcooley | September 9, 2009 1:42 PM | Report abuse

Over his lifetime, Obama has 'been around' a great mamy people. He is still a centrist. Policies count, not somebody he lived in the same neighborhood with 20 year ago.


Bringing this crap up is a straw man and pathetic. What counts is that McDonnell's 'ideas' are crap.

From the Roanake Times:

"I have looked over the McDonnell plan on his campaign Web site, www.bobmcdonnell.com. You should, too.

What you'll find is a patchwork that's overloaded with complexity, chock full of wishful thinking and seriously flawed overall. It can best be summarized as "Booze, borrowing, tolls and BS.""

http://blogs.roanoke.com/rtblogs/dancasey/2009/07/28/tuesdays-column-mcdonnells-transportation-plan-is-booze-borrowing-tolls-and-bs/

And:

"The VEA is troubled that the Comprehensive Statewide Transportation Plan unveiled by Bob McDonnell diverts funds traditionally utilized to fund core state services such as public schools, higher education, health and public safety.

”This is absolutely the wrong time to pit the interests of the construction industry against Virginia’s school children,” said VEA President Kitty Boitnott, PhD, NBCT. “The proposal to divert these hundreds of millions in funds comes at a time when the current revenue stream is insufficient to fund current education and other core state programs.”

Posted by: drindl | September 9, 2009 1:39 PM | Report abuse

regurgitation of hackneyed approved terms ("racism, sexism, homophobia") when confronted with any social issue. The Democratic brain has been marinating so long in those clichés that it's positively pickled.


Spot on accurate Camille. Evidence abounds in this sandbox.

Posted by: snowbama | September 9, 2009 1:21 PM | Report abuse

>> In reality, the thesis papers mean little-have you read Michele Obama's thesis?

No, but she's not running for office either. If she did then we could talk. And I don't play the guilt by association game and any intelligent person doesn't either. I've met and talked with people that have committed felonies, does that make me a criminal or a felon? No. I've never actually commited a crime either. You can't judge a person by associates. Only what they do or say. Which is why I take things like writings at face value.

Thesis do mean a lot. I wrote one, granted I'm a science major and not ever getting into politics, but the principle is the same. You write what you believe in, which I firmly stood behind my thesis in the predation of extinct creatures which would probably be seen by the religious right as trying to indocrinate people with evolution.

>>He wants government to enforce the idea that the man is 'head' of the family and decide for you if you may work and when you can have children, among other things

Irony is I am now for my family. I'm sure that would probably upset him greatly because I'm supporting my parents.

I'm just not alright with telling anyone to have more children is all, or placing undo hardships on the family dynamic which impacting ability to work through changes in day care/etc would cause hardship. Having a child could create a very bad hardship for some just managing to take care of themselves. Regardless of what he wants, or how people want to justify it, there isn't a good justification for it other than this is his warped opinion. Declining birthrates are part of industralization and actually a measure of economic success. I could care less if I have to support 4 retirees in the transition which is what it would be with all the babyboomers retiring (they made their own mess personally), and having children only increases the burden because childrearing is not the cakewalk people want it to be. Telling any woman to have more children is just overstepping personal bounds and basically treating us like second class citizens.

Posted by: mtcooley | September 9, 2009 1:18 PM | Report abuse

drindl,

You say those guys are irrelevant, but yet it reflects the type of people Obama lets himself be around. Yet, he won the election anyways because the American people weren't happy with the status quo. It is exactly the same thing now in terms of McDonnell. People want solutions to transportation, health care, economy, and taxes. If you think having a debate about abortion (rasmussen did a poll and showed that people trust republicans more 44-37 on this issue) then go ahead. The fact is that people are voting their pocket book and whether you like or not, that is not Deeds. Sure things can change, but trying to play up conservative social stances in a battleground electorate isn't the best approach. It would work better in NJ where the electorate is more noticeably liberal. Christie is not a mobster; he doesn't have ties to a bunch of crooks-what party affiliation was the last corruption bust mostly of? NJ is a referendum on Corzine-you can try to change the subject all you want, but when you have an incumbent running for re-election that's just reality. If a blue state doesn't think their governor is competitant enough for a 2nd term-that's a reflection on Corzine. When your defense of your candidate is that the other guy is worse-you know you are in trouble

Posted by: TexasProud1 | September 9, 2009 1:16 PM | Report abuse

I have no problem with the opinions you stole, snowbama. I do have a problem with plagiarism. If you can cut and paste their columns, you can cut and paste a link, or at least their names.

==

Just PgUp and email CC. Don't bother with the ReportAbuse, it goes to some bit bucket

Posted by: GoldAndTanzanite | September 9, 2009 1:16 PM | Report abuse

'drindl: I don't read them and I don't reply and I normally don't comment. But these 3 are going in an email to Chris.'

all the sane people here should email CC about the plagerism and racism.

Posted by: drindl | September 9, 2009 1:13 PM | Report abuse

I have no problem with the opinions you stole, snowbama. I do have a problem with plagiarism. If you can cut and paste their columns, you can cut and paste a link, or at least their names.

Posted by: mikeinmidland | September 9, 2009 1:09 PM | Report abuse

It seems the pea-sized brains of the leftist morons are overcome by dissent. so much so that they need the assitance of big brother to filter out the noise. I keep forgetting this sandbox belongs to the perpetually unemployed and uncritical stooges of the left.

too bad the "boycott" of WSJ and fox news, especially Glenn beck was a joke. It only illuminated the ignorance of market principles that has always been the downfall of liberals. Knowing nothing and proud of it is not a long term strategy for success.

People, please only post glowing praise for extreme liberalism and also extreme hate for all things conservative on this blog.

any writing from successful, professional thinkers or writers will be swiftly ignored. We need to keep this blog emotional and illiterate. If you need to cut and paste from lefty hate sites, please do so, by all means. Cc will gladly overlook it.

Meanwhile the rest of you (other than the lefty haters) stay on topic and no insults.

Posted by: snowbama | September 9, 2009 12:58 PM | Report abuse

once more:

http://www.aei.org/article/100997

drindl: I don't read them and I don't reply and I normally don't comment. But these 3 are going in an email to Chris.

Posted by: mikeinmidland | September 9, 2009 12:45 PM | Report abuse

Ouch!!

How has "liberty" become the inspirational code word of conservatives rather than liberals? (A prominent example is radio host Mark Levin's book "Liberty and Tyranny: A Conservative Manifesto," which was No. 1 on the New York Times bestseller list for nearly three months without receiving major reviews, including in the Times.) I always thought that the Democratic Party is the freedom party -- but I must be living in the nostalgic past. Remember Bob Dylan's 1964 song "Chimes of Freedom," made famous by the Byrds? And here's Richie Havens electrifying the audience at Woodstock with "Freedom! Freedom!" Even Linda Ronstadt, in the 1967 song "A Different Drum," with the Stone Ponys, provided a soaring motto for that decade: "All I'm saying is I'm not ready/ For any person, place or thing/ To try and pull the reins in on me."

But affluent middle-class Democrats now seem to be complacently servile toward authority and automatically believe everything party leaders tell them. Why? Is it because the new professional class is a glossy product of generically institutionalized learning? Independent thought and logical analysis of argument are no longer taught. Elite education in the U.S. has become a frenetic assembly line of competitive college application to schools where ideological brainwashing is so pandemic that it's invisible. The top schools, from the Ivy League on down, promote "critical thinking," which sounds good but is in fact just a style of rote regurgitation of hackneyed approved terms ("racism, sexism, homophobia") when confronted with any social issue. The Democratic brain has been marinating so long in those clichés that it's positively pickled.

Posted by: snowbama | September 9, 2009 12:44 PM | Report abuse

sick
The Arlington Independent School District in Texas decided not to show President Obama’s address to students live yesterday because it reportedly didn’t want to interrupt its regularly scheduled lesson plans. However, the district has now decided to bus its students off-campus on Sept. 21 to hear President Bush speak:

District officials said it’s part of a Cowboys Stadium field trip that the North Texas Super Bowl Host Committee invited 28 fifth-grade classes to attend several months ago.

In addition to hearing from Bush and former first lady Laura Bush, the students will hear from legendary Dallas Cowboys players and North Texas business and community leaders. The event launches the Super Bowl committee’s largest-ever youth education program.

Dwight McKissic, the pastor at the Cornerstone Baptist Church, which offered an alternative venue for Arlington families wishing to listen to the President yesterday, criticized the school district’s “blatant double standard.” “Why is it appropriate for students to hear from former President Bush on Sept. 21 at the Cowboy[s] Stadium, but inappropriate for the current president to address students while they remain on school campuses?” McKissic asked.

Posted by: drindl | September 9, 2009 12:44 PM | Report abuse

This column has been calling for heads to roll at the White House from the get-go. Thankfully, they do seem to be falling faster -- as witness the middle-of-the-night bum's rush given to "green jobs" czar Van Jones last week -- but there's a long way to go. An example of the provincial amateurism of current White House operations was the way the president's innocuous back-to-school pep talk got sandbagged by imbecilic support materials soliciting students to write fantasy letters to "help" the president (a coercive directive quickly withdrawn under pressure). Even worse, the entire project was stupidly scheduled to conflict with the busy opening days of class this week, when harried teachers already have their hands full. Comically, some major school districts, including New York City, were not even open yet. And this is the gang who wants to revamp national healthcare?

et tu camille???

Posted by: snowbama | September 9, 2009 12:39 PM | Report abuse

There is an element of convenient fantasy as well in Obama's health care statements to date. We are going to save money by spending money. We are going to solve our fiscal problems with a program that will increase the national debt by $1,000,000,000,000 over a decade. We are going to guarantee you can keep your current insurance with a bill that encourages your employer to stop offering it.

The list goes on. We are going to improve health care for seniors by cutting $500,000,000,000 from Medicare. We aren't going to insure illegal aliens, except that we won't have any verification provisions to see that they can't apply and get benefits.

Most politicians like to promise voters all good things at once. Democrats got in the habit of doing this over the past 14 years when they could not pass legislation by themselves. Van Jones' moment in the White House is over. Exposure of his record in conservative media made him politically unacceptable, even though mainstream outlets like the New York Times ignored the issue entirely.

The Democrats' health insurance bills remain under consideration, and with large majorities in both houses, passage of some bill cannot be ruled out. But August town hall meetings and national polls have put the Democrats on the defensive. No-enemies-to-the-left and convenient fantasies may work in Chicago. They don't work so well when your constituency is the whole United States.

Posted by: snowbama | September 9, 2009 12:36 PM | Report abuse

mike, i always check the sigs. when i see it's snobama/kingofzouk, I know it will be plagerized sewage so i just scroll on past. don't waste your time.

Posted by: drindl | September 9, 2009 12:34 PM | Report abuse

"Have you read Michele Obama's thesis? Or, did you mind that Obama has been friends with Jeremiah Wright, Bill Ayers, or Van Jones? "

Michelle is not running for office. I don't give a damn about any of these people -- they are completely irrelevant.

Do you mind that Bush kisses Saudi princes on the lips? That has just about as much relevance.

I don't have to try to slime Christie. He's already done it himself.

Posted by: drindl | September 9, 2009 12:32 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: mikeinmidland | September 9, 2009 12:30 PM | Report abuse

snowbama is stealing his diatribes in large chunks.

http://www.gopusa.com/commentary/dlimbaugh/2009/dl_0909p.shtml

If it talks like a zouk and steals like a zouk....

Posted by: mikeinmidland | September 9, 2009 12:28 PM | Report abuse

The truth I won't be speaking tonight:
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Retirees believe that their Medicare bills are paid from a "trust fund" that was created with deductions from their paychecks. But this is a politician's lie.

In truth, our predecessors spent every penny of those contributions immediately. They spent them on wars and pork that helped them get re-elected. The money for current retirees' health care is taken from today's workers.

This Ponzi scheme worked for a while. But then more people had the nerve to live longer. The average life span increased from 71 to 78 years. When Medicare began, there were five workers for every Medicare recipient. Now there are only four. And by 2030, the Board of Medicare Trustees expects there to be just 2.4. Unless millions of new young workers suddenly arrive from some other planet, there is no way that there will be enough workers to pay the Medicare benefits that we politicians have promised. Medicare's unfunded liability is $37 trillion -- yes, trillion. It's a scam. We politicians should be ashamed of what we promised our constituents.

We locked up Bernie Madoff for less.

Therefore, today I apologize for defending the absurd health care bills that have emerged from your committees -- proposals that would add trillions of dollars of additional debt to an already unsustainable system.

Posted by: snowbama | September 9, 2009 12:27 PM | Report abuse

The thesis in question is NOT a college thesis. McDonnell wrote it in his mid-thirties while attending a graduate program and shortly before entering the VA legislature. Most important, he followed through on many of his goals. I wouldn't try to defend a senior project from college, but I stand behind my PhD thesis 15 years later. It's on buckminsterfullerene, so I doubt it'll come up in any political campaigns.

Yeah, I'm perfectly willing to give McDonnell a pass on the barefoot and pregnant portions of the thesis. However, on any portion of the thesis that later showed up in his legislative career, that is more than fair game. The thesis reveals his thinking; his actions in the legislature prove it wasn't just some thought exercise.

BB

Posted by: FairlingtonBlade | September 9, 2009 12:26 PM | Report abuse

To these elites, it's less dangerous to society for omniscient liberals of their caliber to be the custodians of the news than for unlimited news sources to compete and be regulated only by the common sense and collective wisdom of the people -- just as we'd be better off if a government bureaucracy controlled our health care decisions, the automobile industry, education, our mortgages and pretty much anything else it can inhale.

It's not Obama who didn't vet Jones, but the MSM who have never vetted Obama. Had they vetted Obama, they would have realized that he is Van Jones and that he didn't need to vet Van Jones because he already knew him and considered him a soul mate. Besides, I thought the MSM complaint on the Jones affair was not that Jones is a radical, but that he got railroaded out by an out-of-control, "unfiltered" alternative media.

Now, which is it, boys? Is Jones an unacceptable radical who was properly exposed by the alternative media doing the job you wouldn't do? Or is he a hapless mainstream guy victimized by a bunch of radical righties? See what I mean by the MSM's sputtering incoherence?

Posted by: snowbama | September 9, 2009 12:22 PM | Report abuse

The MSM are engaging in a colossal temper tantrum over their lost news monopoly -- a monopoly they forfeited through their bias, arrogance and self-imposed insulation.

This is an especially hard pill for them to swallow considering that during the past year, they've been stewing in the intoxicating delusion that they were again supreme, as they appeared to be getting away with their conspiratorial enthroning of King Barack Obama. And they're not handling rejection well.

On "Meet the Press'" round-table discussion, retired "NBC Nightly News" anchor Tom Brokaw and New York Times columnist Tom Friedman were protesting the grass roots' and alternative media's unmasking of Van Jones as a radical leftist.

Brokaw said: "A lot of people will repeat back to me and take it as face value something that they read on the Internet. And my line to them is you have to vet information. ... It is across-the-board ... and it's something that we all have to address, and it requires society and political and cultural leaders to stand up and say, 'This is crazy.' We just can't function that way."

As opposed to "functioning" what other way? Perhaps he means the old way of having his beloved mainstream media spoon-feed us ignorant masses only the information and slant they want us to hear. Does Brokaw believe his colleagues properly "vetted" Barack Obama and his mysterious past and dubious associations during the presidential campaign? Do they ask him any penetrating questions today? Have they ever pressed him to explain his voluminous inconsistencies and deceptions on health care alone?

To borrow your terminology, Mr. Brokaw, society -- mainstream America, at least -- is indeed standing up and saying: "This is crazy. We just can't function with an extremist president trying to turn America into a socialist and insolvent state and installing a cadre of unconstitutionally appointed, immensely powerful and wholly unaccountable Marxist czars at the highest levels of our government. And we're sick and tired of the mainstream media's aiding and abetting this reckless destruction."


how else could a leftist commy like me ever get elected. same for my brothers in VA and NJ. Please swiftboat and macaca these guys.

Posted by: snowbama | September 9, 2009 12:20 PM | Report abuse

"It wasn't a college thesis -- it was law school and McDonnell was 34 at the time he wrote it. He was elected to the legislature 2 years later and immediately began trying to implement all 15 principles he elaborated in the thesis, and has tried to pass bills on at least 10 of them since."

Yeah, if he wants to distance himself from his nonsense, then just use the time distance. Don't try and call it a college thesis. That's deliberately trying to mislead people to think it was written by some 19 year old.

Posted by: DDAWD | September 9, 2009 12:19 PM | Report abuse

Mike, drindl, mtcooley,

Those are interesting replies; I don't agree with them-but if you want to use them then fine by me. In reality, the thesis papers mean little-have you read Michele Obama's thesis? Or, did you mind that Obama has been friends with Jeremiah Wright, Bill Ayers, or Van Jones? The point is that my side tried to convince people that Obama held the same beliefs of those guys (and I can't say he has disproven it-but that isn't relevant here). The point was that the country was sick of Bush and wanted a change. It's the same thing here. In NJ-people are sick of Corzine-whether it was tax increases, kickbacks to his girlfriend, etc. You can try to slime Christie's reputation, but the thing is Corzine has the same amount of credibility to NJ voters as Bush did leaving office. When a governor's race involves an incumbent, it's a referendum on the incumbent. Obama will not have any problems carrying NJ in'12 barring a major collapse. Corzine did it to himself. In VA, since it's an open seat with two candidates with little national exposure and in a battleground state, there are some national factors that will weigh in here. But as a practical matter, the economy, health care, and transportation will decide this race. Discussing social issues in a climate like this just isn't going to move the barometer. It didn't work in '05 when the Republicans tried to use the death penalty against Kaine. Social issues won't decide this race. Again, like I said, governor races have the ability to transcend party labels. You have Democratic governors in blood red states like OK, KS, WY, KY and you have Republican governors in deep ocean blue states like RI, HI, CA, VT

Posted by: TexasProud1 | September 9, 2009 12:17 PM | Report abuse

"The elites in the media." I suppose Cro-Magnon Man is referring to people with a greater than elementary school education...

Nope, just the ones that cling to their guns and religion.

Posted by: RobT1 | September 9, 2009 12:06 PM | Report abuse

Christie is a Bush/Cheney creation. He can't obscure that fact from the voting public and he will lose on that issue alone.
McDonnell wants our government to serve his church. He can't obscure that fact from the voting public and he will lose on that issue alone.

Posted by: margaretmeyers | September 9, 2009 12:04 PM | Report abuse

"The only people who find these opinions offensive are the elites in the media (although their offense is fake) and the left wing Democrats on this board."

"The elites in the media." I suppose Cro-Magnon Man is referring to people with a greater than elementary school education...

Posted by: drindl | September 9, 2009 11:59 AM | Report abuse

"A PRIMARY CAN DO FUNNY THINGS TO PEOPLE
Tweet from Sen. Arlen Specter (D-PA): "This U.S. Senator is going to tell him (the President) emphatically that we need the public option."


Sestak has done some good even if he loses.

Posted by: drindl | September 9, 2009 11:57 AM | Report abuse

mtcooley -- if you are a young working woman, you are exactly the target of McConnell's policies. He wants government to enforce the idea that the man is 'head' of the family and decide for you if you may work and when you can have children, among other things.

Almost everything he wants to do is aimed at giving government complete control over women's bodies. It is shockngly misogynist. Or would be, if we hadn't heard it all a thousand times before from the right.

Posted by: drindl | September 9, 2009 11:53 AM | Report abuse

I think the fact that the media is going back and trying to dig up any kind of dirt they can on both McDonnell and Christie goes to show you that they at least are worried that these off year elections will be a referendum on their Messiah. If not where is the in depth analysis of past utterances and writing of Corzine and Deeds? For that matter I think the reason why these "revelations" about McDonnell college thesis and what he supposedly said in 1993 is not affecting the race in Virginia at all no matter how much the media tries to build it up is because to the every day voter in Virginia these opinons expressed by McDonnel all those years ago are not outside of the mainstream. The only people who find these opinions offensive are the elites in the media (although their offense is fake) and the left wing Democrats on this board.

Posted by: RobT1 | September 9, 2009 11:53 AM | Report abuse

Re: Christie. The loan and the accident are just two parts of the same character flaw. Christie believes that power and influence are more important than the rule of law. Thus, he can get himself out of a traffic violation with a "Do you know who I am?" speech, and he can buy favors from a colleague with a low-interest loan.

Posted by: mikeinmidland | September 9, 2009 11:48 AM | Report abuse

>>Unfortunately, it seems the Post is trying to make the race about a COLLEGE thesis and give Deeds some talking points, but if you think talking about abortion when the nation is preoccupied with fiscal issues in a purple state is going to win-good luck

As pointed out it was a Master's thesis and he was far from a child when he wrote it. And it's not just about a single issue but multiple ones that aren't that contriversial to normal people. Like day care for working mothers, working mothers outside the home, birth control with married couples. This are not even normal conservative postions even by my very red district. If someone was espousing these ideas in a thesis, which is a statement that a writer puts personal validity in when they're doing it, I think it's right to be concerned about how he would try to impliment them. People don't write these things without personal conviction.

Those sort of social positions affect people, and are decidedly part of a family's fiscal situation in many cases. I'm sorry that you don't see them as that but I do, I have to work as a young woman and I'll have to work when I decide to have a child. Those kinds of thoughts in a major political candidate are particularly concerning.

Actually I find the fact Christie loaned money to be more of a concern than the accident. That's just a straight conflict of interest. You never loan that kind of money between co-workers anywhere and especially not that amount. Regardless of how upfront the people are it changes the work dynamic between the two to something other than a professional working relationship.

Posted by: mtcooley | September 9, 2009 11:41 AM | Report abuse

Perhaps you'd like me to apologize to McDonnell for assuming he was brighter at 34 than he proved himself to be?

Posted by: mikeinmidland | September 9, 2009 11:38 AM | Report abuse

Never claimed it. I said "I don't believe" because I hadn't read it, and it struck me as a very poor supporting argument. Low birthrates in America is not a reason to outlaw birth control, any more than high population in China is a reason to enforce birth control.

Bad policy. Worse ethics.

Posted by: mikeinmidland | September 9, 2009 11:36 AM | Report abuse

mikeinmidland:

At least you know better now than to claim that McDonnell's thesis does not cite to America's reduced birthrates -- I would have no problem voting for someone like him and defending his thesis too -- have fun on the thread today ; )

Posted by: JakeD | September 9, 2009 11:28 AM | Report abuse


Agreed, drindl. I never thought it was correct to see these as referenda on Obama. From my limited reading, I'd hate to have to pick the lesser of two evils in NJ. And although Deeds may be less than inspiring, I wouldn't vote for someone like McDonnell no matter what his political affiliation.

Governors'races have very little to do with national politics in any case, and not being a resident of NJ or VA, I really don't care much. If the race tightens enough so that pundits stop calling them referenda on Obama (for fear the D wins) that's good enough for me.

Posted by: mikeinmidland | September 9, 2009 11:16 AM | Report abuse

It wasn't a college thesis -- it was law school and McDonnell was 34 at the time he wrote it. He was elected to the legislature 2 years later and immediately began trying to implement all 15 principles he elaborated in the thesis, and has tried to pass bills on at least 10 of them since.

Yeah, NJ is crooked, but it wasn't well known just how crooked Christie is, and that's starting to sink in.

Mike, I had to laugh too. As long as Republlicans looked to win, Chris said these two races were referendums on Obama. Now that it looks like Dems may prevail, suddenly, 'all politics is local.'

Posted by: drindl | September 9, 2009 11:09 AM | Report abuse

CHRISTIE OK'ED WARRANTLESS CELL PHONE TRACKING OF NJ CITIZENS: ACLU

• Autocratic policies, ties to Bush administration abuses, ethical blind spot, should disqualify him from governorship.

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2009/04/aclu_says_chris_christie_autho.html

Posted by: scrivener50 | September 9, 2009 10:58 AM | Report abuse

OK, CC, I'm going to call foul here. When you brought these two races to our attention, you were espousing the very same bellwether notions that you are presently cautioning against. Now that these races may tighten, you revert to "all politics is local?" I haven't been one to try to label you as partisan, but this seems suspicious.

Posted by: mikeinmidland | September 9, 2009 10:56 AM | Report abuse

NJ is a referendum of Corzine and VA right now is unclear though there is definitely an indirect referendum on Obama since there is no incumbency. Corzine can try to attach Bush to Christie, but there is a reason he has an approval rating 15-20 points lower than both Senators and Obama in NJ-he's been a lousy leader. You can go through every idiotic move he's made but the thing about governor's races is that they are inheritantly less about one's party affiliation and more about the individual. It's how you have Dem governor's recently in KS, WY, & OK while you have had Rep governors in MA, RI, CA & HI. VA is interesting because Deeds is making the same mistakes Kilgore made 4 years ago, try to make race on social issues when there are more pressing issues on voter's minds. Unfortunately, it seems the Post is trying to make the race about a COLLEGE thesis and give Deeds some talking points, but if you think talking about abortion when the nation is preoccupied with fiscal issues in a purple state is going to win-good luck

Posted by: TexasProud1 | September 9, 2009 10:50 AM | Report abuse

The McDonnell issue has longer legs then Christie in my opinion. There is a story in the Post today about how McDonnell in 2003 had some very suspect opinions about homosexuals serving on the bench. By itself it wouldn't be that big of a deal but taken with his thesis it seems his opinions haven't changed after all.

Everyone knew Christie was crooked. Its New Jersey, every politician is a sleaze.

Posted by: AndyR3 | September 9, 2009 10:37 AM | Report abuse

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